8

Given the following simple task of finding odd numbers in a one dimensional array:

begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
        Inc(odds);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Serial: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

It looks like this would be a good candidate for parallel processing. So one might be tempted to use the following TParallel.For version:

begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallel.For(0,  MaxArr-1, procedure(I:Integer)
  begin
    if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
      inc(odds);
  end);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel - false odds: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

The result of this parallel computation is somewhat surprising in two respects:

  1. The number of counted odds is wrong

  2. The execution time is longer than in the serial version

1) Is explainable, because we did not protect the odds variable for concurrent access. So in order to fix this, we should use TInterlocked.Increment(odds); instead.

2) Is also explainable: It exhibits the effects of false sharing.

Ideally the solution to the false sharing problem would be to use a local variable to store intermediate results and only at the end of all parallel tasks sum up those intermediaries. And here is my real question that I cannot get my head around: Is there any way to get a local variable into my anonymous method? Note, that simply declaring a local variable within the anonymous method body would not work, as the anonymous method body is called for each iteration. And if that is somehow doable, would there be a way to get my intermediate result at the end of each task iteration out of the anonymous method?

Edit: I am actually not really interested in counting odds, or evans. I only use this to demonstrate the effect.

And for completeness reasons here is a console app demonstrating the effects:

program Project4;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Threading, System.Classes, System.SyncObjs;

const
  MaxArr = 100000000;

var
  Ticks: Cardinal;
  i: Integer;
  odds: Integer;
  ArrXY: array of Integer;

procedure FillArray;
var
  i: Integer;
  j: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(ArrXY, MaxArr);
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      ArrXY[i]:=Random(MaxInt);
end;

procedure Parallel;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallel.For(0,  MaxArr-1, procedure(I:Integer)
  begin
    if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
      TInterlocked.Increment(odds);
  end);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

procedure ParallelFalseResult;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallel.For(0,  MaxArr-1, procedure(I:Integer)
  begin
    if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
      inc(odds);
  end);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel - false odds: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

procedure Serial;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
        Inc(odds);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Serial: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

begin
  try
    FillArray;
    Serial;
    ParallelFalseResult;
    Parallel;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
  Readln;
end.
  • 1
    Setting up and calling all those anonymous methods takes far more time than executing the method. So "false sharing" is not the real problem here. As you discovered, interlockedincrement has to be used, and this Will stall the process as well. As for storing intermediates, you could use a global array. In this case though, a normal single threaded solution is to prefer. – LU RD Dec 17 '14 at 22:13
  • Map reduce is what you want. Although this task is so trivial, threading overhead will dominate – David Heffernan Dec 17 '14 at 22:19
  • @LURD, how would I access a global array from within my anonymous method? Can you give me an example. – iamjoosy Dec 17 '14 at 22:42
  • You have the index, just use that to store the result of each iteration. I'm assuming your real task is different than this example. Or follow Davids recommendation, Is there a MapReduce library for Delphi?. – LU RD Dec 17 '14 at 22:58
  • @LURD in fact, I dont habe a real task at all. You can think oft my question as an academic one. And sorry, how could I use the index to store my results? Can you show me some code, because I dont get it. – iamjoosy Dec 17 '14 at 23:15
11

The key for this problem is correct partitioning and sharing as little as possible.

With this code it runs almost 4 times faster than the serial one.

const 
  WorkerCount = 4;

function GetWorker(index: Integer; const oddsArr: TArray<Integer>): TProc;
var
  min, max: Integer;
begin
  min := MaxArr div WorkerCount * index;
  if index + 1 < WorkerCount then
    max := MaxArr div WorkerCount * (index + 1) - 1
  else
    max := MaxArr - 1;
  Result :=
    procedure
    var
      i: Integer;
      odds: Integer;
    begin
      odds := 0;
      for i := min to max do
        if Odd(ArrXY[i]) then
          Inc(odds);
      oddsArr[index] := odds;
    end;
end;

procedure Parallel;
var
  i: Integer;
  oddsArr: TArray<Integer>;
  workers: TArray<ITask>;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  SetLength(oddsArr, WorkerCount);
  SetLength(workers, WorkerCount);

  for i := 0 to WorkerCount-1 do
    workers[i] := TTask.Run(GetWorker(i, oddsArr));
  TTask.WaitForAll(workers);

  for i := 0 to WorkerCount-1 do
    Inc(odds, oddsArr[i]);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

You can write similar code with the TParallel.For but it still runs a bit slower (like 3 times faster than serial) than just using TTask.

Btw I used the function to return the worker TProc to get the index capturing right. If you run it in a loop in the same routine you capture the loop variable.

Update 19.12.2014:

Since we found out the critical thing is correct partitioning this can be put into a parallel for loop really easily without locking it on a particular data structure:

procedure ParallelFor(lowInclusive, highInclusive: Integer;
  const iteratorRangeEvent: TProc<Integer, Integer>);

  procedure CalcPartBounds(low, high, count, index: Integer;
    out min, max: Integer);
  var
    len: Integer;
  begin
    len := high - low + 1;
    min := (len div count) * index;
    if index + 1 < count then
      max := len div count * (index + 1) - 1
    else
      max := len - 1;
  end;

  function GetWorker(const iteratorRangeEvent: TProc<Integer, Integer>;
    min, max: Integer): ITask;
  begin
    Result := TTask.Run(
      procedure
      begin
        iteratorRangeEvent(min, max);
      end)
  end;

var
  workerCount: Integer;
  workers: TArray<ITask>;
  i, min, max: Integer;
begin
  workerCount := TThread.ProcessorCount;
  SetLength(workers, workerCount);
  for i := 0 to workerCount - 1 do
  begin
    CalcPartBounds(lowInclusive, highInclusive, workerCount, i, min, max);
    workers[i] := GetWorker(iteratorRangeEvent, min, max);
  end;
  TTask.WaitForAll(workers);
end;

procedure Parallel4;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  ParallelFor(0, MaxArr-1,
    procedure(min, max: Integer)
    var
      i, n: Integer;
    begin
      n := 0;
      for i := min to max do
        if Odd(ArrXY[i]) then
          Inc(n);
      AtomicIncrement(odds, n);
    end);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('ParallelEx: Stefan Glienke ' + Ticks.ToString + ' ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

The key thing is to use a local variable for the counting and only at the end use the shared variable one time to add the sub total.

| improve this answer | |
  • Very nice. In fact I had a similar although not quite as elegant solution using Tasks. But I can't see how one could shoehorn such a solution into a TParallel.For solution - can you elaborate a bit more on this? – iamjoosy Dec 18 '14 at 10:00
  • Putting a simple for-to loop into parallel.for comes with overhead itself as every iteration is an anonymous method call (and much more) which alone would destroy performance for a simple thing as in your example. But to make that work I guess you need something like partitioner as they call it in the .NET TPL. TParallel.For is not the silver bullet to make every thing parallel. There are other (better) ways to do that as this example shows. – Stefan Glienke Dec 18 '14 at 10:21
  • "There are other (better) ways to do that as this example shows" ... that was pretty much my feeling when I asked the question. I just thought I was overlooking something. And I fully agree, a partitioner + aggregator would be the way to go. Well maybe XE8 or 9 – iamjoosy Dec 18 '14 at 10:38
  • Thanks Stefan! Inspired by your answer I came up with a slightly more reusable solution - see my answer below. Maybe you want to have a look at it, I am sure it can be improved in many ways. – iamjoosy Dec 19 '14 at 17:04
  • @iamjoosy Great! However I could not resist to improve it a bit to not be coupled to the data structure. See my edit. – Stefan Glienke Dec 19 '14 at 19:38
4

With OmniThreadLibrary from the SVN (this is not yet including in any official release), you can write this in a way which doesn't require interlocked access to the shared counter.

function CountParallelOTL: integer;
var
  counters: array of integer;
  numCores: integer;
  i: integer;
begin
  numCores := Environment.Process.Affinity.Count;
  SetLength(counters, numCores);
  FillChar(counters[0], Length(counters) * SizeOf(counters[0]), 0);

  Parallel.For(0, MaxArr - 1)
    .NumTasks(numCores)
    .Execute(
      procedure(taskIndex, value: integer)
      begin
        if Odd(ArrXY[value]) then
          Inc(counters[taskIndex]);
      end);

  Result := counters[0];
  for i := 1 to numCores - 1 do
    Inc(Result, counters[i]);
end;

This, however, is still at best on par with the sequential loop and at worst a few times slower.

I have compared this with Stefan's solution (XE7 tasks) and with a simple XE7 Parallel.For with interlocked increment (XE7 for).

Results from my notebook with 4 hyperthreaded cores:

Serial: 49999640 odd elements found in 543 ms

Parallel (OTL): 49999640 odd elements found in 555 ms

Parallel (XE7 tasks): 49999640 odd elements found in 136 ms

Parallel (XE7 for): 49999640 odd elements found in 1667 ms

Results from my workstation with 12 hyperthreaded cores:

Serial: 50005291 odd elements found in 685 ms

Parallel (OTL): 50005291 odd elements found in 1309 ms

Parallel (XE7 tasks): 50005291 odd elements found in 62 ms

Parallel (XE7 for): 50005291 odd elements found in 3379 ms

There's a big improvement over System.Threading Paralell.For because there's no interlocked increment but the handcrafted solution is much much faster.

Full test program:

program ParallelCount;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SyncObjs,
  System.Classes,
  System.SysUtils,
  System.Threading,
  DSiWin32,
  OtlCommon,
  OtlParallel;

const
  MaxArr = 100000000;

var
  Ticks: Cardinal;
  i: Integer;
  odds: Integer;
  ArrXY: array of Integer;

procedure FillArray;
var
  i: Integer;
  j: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(ArrXY, MaxArr);
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
    ArrXY[i]:=Random(MaxInt);
end;

function CountSerial: integer;
var
  odds: integer;
begin
  odds := 0;
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      if Odd(ArrXY[i]) then
        Inc(odds);
  Result := odds;
end;

function CountParallelOTL: integer;
var
  counters: array of integer;
  numCores: integer;
  i: integer;
begin
  numCores := Environment.Process.Affinity.Count;
  SetLength(counters, numCores);
  FillChar(counters[0], Length(counters) * SizeOf(counters[0]), 0);

  Parallel.For(0, MaxArr - 1)
    .NumTasks(numCores)
    .Execute(
      procedure(taskIndex, value: integer)
      begin
        if Odd(ArrXY[value]) then
          Inc(counters[taskIndex]);
      end);

  Result := counters[0];
  for i := 1 to numCores - 1 do
    Inc(Result, counters[i]);
end;

function GetWorker(index: Integer; const oddsArr: TArray<Integer>; workerCount: integer): TProc;
var
  min, max: Integer;
begin
  min := MaxArr div workerCount * index;
  if index + 1 < workerCount then
    max := MaxArr div workerCount * (index + 1) - 1
  else
    max := MaxArr - 1;
  Result :=
    procedure
    var
      i: Integer;
      odds: Integer;
    begin
      odds := 0;
      for i := min to max do
        if Odd(ArrXY[i]) then
          Inc(odds);
      oddsArr[index] := odds;
    end;
end;

function CountParallelXE7Tasks: integer;
var
  i: Integer;
  oddsArr: TArray<Integer>;
  workers: TArray<ITask>;
  workerCount: integer;
begin
  workerCount := Environment.Process.Affinity.Count;
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  SetLength(oddsArr, workerCount);
  SetLength(workers, workerCount);

  for i := 0 to workerCount-1 do
    workers[i] := TTask.Run(GetWorker(i, oddsArr, workerCount));
  TTask.WaitForAll(workers);

  for i := 0 to workerCount-1 do
    Inc(odds, oddsArr[i]);
  Result := odds;
end;

function CountParallelXE7For: integer;
var
  odds: integer;
begin
  odds := 0;
  TParallel.For(0,  MaxArr-1, procedure(I:Integer)
  begin
    if Odd(ArrXY[i]) then
      TInterlocked.Increment(odds);
  end);
  Result := odds;
end;

procedure Count(const name: string; func: TFunc<integer>);
var
  time: int64;
  cnt: integer;
begin
  time := DSiTimeGetTime64;
  cnt := func();
  time := DSiElapsedTime64(time);
  Writeln(name, ': ', cnt, ' odd elements found in ', time, ' ms');
end;

begin
  try
    FillArray;

    Count('Serial', CountSerial);
    Count('Parallel (OTL)', CountParallelOTL);
    Count('Parallel (XE7 tasks)', CountParallelXE7Tasks);
    Count('Parallel (XE7 for)', CountParallelXE7For);

    Readln;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
end.
| improve this answer | |
  • What really kills performance in this particular example is calling the anonymous method for every item. I think that's the only reason why why my solution beats yours. – Stefan Glienke Dec 19 '14 at 19:42
  • Yes, that's most probably the main reason. Simplicity or performance - can't have both ... – gabr Dec 20 '14 at 10:22
2

I think we discussed this before regarding OmniThreadLibrary. The main cause for the time being longer for the multithreaded solution is the overhead of TParallel.For compared to the time needed for the actual calculation.

A local variable won't be of any help here, while a global threadvar might solve the false sharing issue. Alas, you might not find a way to sum up all these treadvars after finishing the loop.

IIRC, the best approach is to chop the task in reasonable parts and work on a range of array entries for each iteration and increments a variable dedicated to that part. That alone won't solve the false sharing problem as that occurs even with distinct variables if they happen to be just part of the same cache line.

Another solution could be to write a class that handles a given slice of the array in a serial manner, act on multiple instances of this class in parallel and evaluate the results afterwards.

BTW: your code doesn't count the odds - it counts the evens.

And: there is a built-in function named Odd that usually is of better performance than the mod code you are using.

| improve this answer | |
  • indeed, Uwe, we have been investigating this issue together before. While you are right, that the call overhead is the main issue in my trivial example, even if you increase the computational load in the loop, the results are similar. While we could sucessfully solve the issue in the Omnithread library, I dont see a way to do this with the TParallel.for loop as it is implemented currently – iamjoosy Dec 17 '14 at 22:39
  • Fastest way to find out if an integer is Odd or not is by simply reading the state of the rightmost bit. If it is 1 then the number is odd if it is 0 then the number is even. I belive function named Odd uses this approach, but I'm not sure. – SilverWarior Dec 17 '14 at 22:56
  • Btw, a local variable would solve the problem! I actually coded the same task using four ITasks (4 Cores in my machine) with local variables and it scaled almost perfectly. – iamjoosy Dec 17 '14 at 23:08
  • A group of ITasks is a complete different approach than TParallel.For and thus allows other implementations. The problem occurs from trying to use TParallel.For for the multithreading approach just because the single threaded one contains a for loop. It is quite common to change the structure of an algorithm when moving to multithreading. – Uwe Raabe Dec 18 '14 at 10:58
  • You are absolutely right Uwe: TParallel.For is not the tool for my specific task, although just looking at the serial version one might be tempted to think so. – iamjoosy Dec 18 '14 at 19:19
2

Ok, inspired by Stefan Glienke's answer I drafted a more reusable TParalleEx Class that instead of ITasks uses IFutures. The class is also somewhat modeled after the C# TPL with an aggregation delegate.This is just a first draft, but shows how the existing PPL can be extended with relative ease. This version now scales perfectly on my system - I would be happy if others could test it on different configurations. Thanks to all for your fruitful answers and comments.

program Project4;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  System.SysUtils, System.Threading, System.Classes, System.SyncObjs;

const
  MaxArr = 100000000;

var
  Ticks: Cardinal;
  i: Integer;
  odds: Integer;
  ArrXY: TArray<Integer>;

type

TParallelEx<TSource, TResult> = class
  private
    class function GetWorker(body: TFunc<TArray<TSource>, Integer, Integer, TResult>; source: TArray<TSource>; min, max: Integer): TFunc<TResult>;
  public
    class procedure &For(source: TArray<TSource>;
                         body: TFunc<TArray<TSource>, Integer, Integer, TResult>;
                         aggregator: TProc<TResult>);
  end;

procedure FillArray;
var
  i: Integer;
  j: Integer;
begin
  SetLength(ArrXY, MaxArr);
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      ArrXY[i]:=Random(MaxInt);
end;

procedure Parallel;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallel.For(0,  MaxArr-1, procedure(I:Integer)
  begin
    if ArrXY[i] mod 2 <> 0 then
      TInterlocked.Increment(odds);
  end);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

procedure Serial;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  for i := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
      if ArrXY[i] mod 2 <> 0 then
        Inc(odds);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Serial: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

const
  WorkerCount = 4;

function GetWorker(index: Integer; const oddsArr: TArray<Integer>): TProc;
var
  min, max: Integer;
begin
  min := MaxArr div WorkerCount * index;
  if index + 1 < WorkerCount then
    max := MaxArr div WorkerCount * (index + 1) - 1
  else
    max := MaxArr - 1;
  Result :=
    procedure
    var
      i: Integer;
      odds: Integer;
    begin
      odds := 0;
      for i := min to max do
        if ArrXY[i] mod 2 <> 0 then
          Inc(odds);
      oddsArr[index] := odds;
    end;
end;

procedure Parallel2;
var
  i: Integer;
  oddsArr: TArray<Integer>;
  workers: TArray<ITask>;
begin
  odds := 0;
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  SetLength(oddsArr, WorkerCount);
  SetLength(workers, WorkerCount);

  for i := 0 to WorkerCount-1 do
    workers[i] := TTask.Run(GetWorker(i, oddsArr));
  TTask.WaitForAll(workers);

  for i := 0 to WorkerCount-1 do
    Inc(odds, oddsArr[i]);
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('Parallel: Stefan Glienke ' + Ticks.ToString + ' ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

procedure parallel3;
var
  sum: Integer;
begin
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallelEx<Integer, Integer>.For( ArrXY,
     function(Arr: TArray<Integer>; min, max: Integer): Integer
      var
        i: Integer;
        res: Integer;
      begin
        res := 0;
        for i := min to max do
          if Arr[i] mod 2 <> 0 then
            Inc(res);
        Result := res;
      end,
      procedure(res: Integer) begin sum := sum + res; end );
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;
  writeln('ParallelEx: Markus Joos ' + Ticks.ToString + ' ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;

{ TParallelEx<TSource, TResult> }

class function TParallelEx<TSource, TResult>.GetWorker(body: TFunc<TArray<TSource>, Integer, Integer, TResult>; source: TArray<TSource>; min, max: Integer): TFunc<TResult>;
begin
  Result := function: TResult
  begin
    Result := body(source, min, max);
  end;
end;

class procedure TParallelEx<TSource, TResult>.&For(source: TArray<TSource>;
  body: TFunc<TArray<TSource>, Integer, Integer, TResult>;
  aggregator: TProc<TResult>);
var
  I: Integer;
  workers: TArray<IFuture<TResult>>;
  workerCount: Integer;
  min, max: integer;
  MaxIndex: Integer;
begin
  workerCount := TThread.ProcessorCount;
  SetLength(workers, workerCount);
  MaxIndex := length(source);
  for I := 0 to workerCount -1 do
  begin
    min := (MaxIndex div WorkerCount) * I;
    if I + 1 < WorkerCount then
      max := MaxIndex div WorkerCount * (I + 1) - 1
    else
      max := MaxIndex - 1;
    workers[i]:= TTask.Future<TResult>(GetWorker(body, source, min, max));
  end;
  for i:= 0 to workerCount-1 do
  begin
    aggregator(workers[i].Value);
  end;
end;

begin
  try
    FillArray;
    Serial;
    Parallel;
    Parallel2;
    Parallel3;
  except
    on E: Exception do
      Writeln(E.ClassName, ': ', E.Message);
  end;
  Readln;
end.
| improve this answer | |
0

Regarding the task of using local variables to collect the sums and then collect them at the end, you can use a separate array for that purpose:

var
  sums: array of Integer;
begin
  SetLength(sums, MaxArr);
  for I := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
    sums[I] := 0;

  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount;
  TParallel.For(0, MaxArr-1,
    procedure(I:Integer)
    begin
      if ArrXY[i] mod 2 = 0 then
        Inc(sums[I]);
    end
  );
  Ticks := TThread.GetTickCount - Ticks;

  odds := 0;
  for I := 0 to MaxArr-1 do
    Inc(odds, sums[i]);

  writeln('Parallel - false odds: ' + Ticks.ToString + 'ms, odds: ' + odds.ToString);
end;
| improve this answer | |
  • The final serial summation traverses an array the same size as the input array! – David Heffernan Dec 17 '14 at 23:19
  • @DavidHeffernan, the example here is not real. The OP wants to store the individual results of each iteration. – LU RD Dec 17 '14 at 23:23
  • I was merely demonstrating how it can be done. I didn't say it should be done. – Remy Lebeau Dec 17 '14 at 23:23
  • First, I think your solution is good because due to the very clever auto adapting stride mechanism that is built into Tparalell.for, the sum array is saved from false sharing effects. In the other Hand, itterating over the whole sum array to sum the results is neither a very nice, nor a very performant solution. – iamjoosy Dec 17 '14 at 23:26
  • @LURD No, he wants to count, that is a reduce step. – David Heffernan Dec 17 '14 at 23:27

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