1267

How can I check if a string (NSString) contains another smaller string?

I was hoping for something like:

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
NSLog(@"%d",[string containsSubstring:@"hello"]);

But the closest I could find was:

if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"] == 0) {
    NSLog(@"sub string doesnt exist");
} 
else {
    NSLog(@"exists");
}

Anyway, is that the best way to find if a string contains another string?

4
  • 1
    I'd like to see it added as well, but in the meantime it's relatively easy to add it as a category on NSString.
    – isaac
    Jan 11, 2013 at 1:48
  • 2
    Using if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"] == 0) {...} there's a type mismatch error for NSRange and int. to fix that, you should change the line to the following: if ([string rangeOfString:@"hello"].length == 0) {...}
    – Neeku
    Nov 11, 2013 at 16:14
  • 1
    iOS 8 adds containsString: and here is a minimally invasive way to add iOS 7 support petersteinberger.com/blog/2014/… Aug 6, 2014 at 3:18
  • 2
    I've been an iOS developer since the beginning and I constantly revisit this post for a quick copy paste. I can't seem to memorize this one. Most visited stackoverflow post in my history. May 4, 2016 at 19:13

23 Answers 23

2484
NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location == NSNotFound) {
  NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
} else {
  NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
}

The key is noticing that rangeOfString: returns an NSRange struct, and the documentation says that it returns the struct {NSNotFound, 0} if the "haystack" does not contain the "needle".


And if you're on iOS 8 or OS X Yosemite, you can now do: (*NOTE: This WILL crash your app if this code is called on an iOS7 device).

NSString *string = @"hello bla blah";
if ([string containsString:@"bla"]) {
  NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
} else {
  NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
}

(This is also how it would work in Swift)

👍

7
  • 288
    To make a case insensitive search use "if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location != NSNotFound)"
    – Vanja
    Mar 28, 2012 at 7:28
  • 1
    @Dave DeLong I was just going to mention a Category that I created for this purpose before I read your edit to the answer! Since I am primarily a c# developer I am glad that they added a contains method to NSSTring.
    – dherrin79
    Sep 5, 2014 at 14:11
  • Why does the compiler don't say anything if my deployment target is iOS7 and I use containsString?
    – Ricardo
    Oct 23, 2015 at 11:05
  • 3
    And to further the point made by @Vanja : if you are going to use the [string containsString] shortcut code that was introduced in iOS 8/Yosemite, you can use the following code for a case insensitive string: "[stringToSearch localizedCaseInsensitiveContainsString:string]", and this one if you want to do a case and diacritic insensitive search: "[stringToSearch localizedStandardContainsString:string]". Mar 28, 2016 at 19:53
  • 1
    Note that the expression [string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location != NSNotFound will be true when string is nil!
    – funroll
    Oct 7, 2016 at 20:12
166

For iOS 8.0+ and macOS 10.10+, you can use NSString's native containsString:.

For older versions of iOS and macOS, you can create your own (obsolete) category for NSString:

@interface NSString ( SubstringSearch )
    - (BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring;
@end

// - - - - 

@implementation NSString ( SubstringSearch )

- (BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring
{    
    NSRange range = [self rangeOfString : substring];
    BOOL found = ( range.location != NSNotFound );
    return found;
}

@end

Note: Observe Daniel Galasko's comment below regarding naming

3
  • 13
    +1 for clearer resulting code and reusability. I turned it into the one liner return [self rangeOfString:substring].location != NSNotFound; and included it in my refactoring library, es_ios_utils. github.com/peterdeweese/es_ios_utils Jul 21, 2011 at 15:21
  • 4
    Looks like Apple likes your idea and added this feature in iOS 8 and OSx 10.10 (Yosemite) as @DaveDeLong mentioned in his answer. +1
    – Islam
    Jan 3, 2015 at 19:32
  • 8
    The cardinal rule for obj-c categories is to prefix the method name with your 3 letter module prefix. This is the perfect example since it now conflicts with the iOS 7 and 10.10 release Feb 17, 2015 at 10:38
57

Since this seems to be a high-ranking result in Google, I want to add this:

iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 add the containsString: method to NSString. An updated version of Dave DeLong's example for those systems:

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string containsString:@"bla"]) {
    NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
} else {
    NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
}
0
41
NSString *myString = @"hello bla bla";
NSRange rangeValue = [myString rangeOfString:@"hello" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch];

if (rangeValue.length > 0)
{
    NSLog(@"string contains hello");
} 
else 
{
    NSLog(@"string does not contain hello!");
}

//You can alternatively use following too :

if (rangeValue.location == NSNotFound) 
{
    NSLog(@"string does not contain hello");
} 
else 
{
    NSLog(@"string contains hello!");
}
25

With iOS 8 and Swift, we can use localizedCaseInsensitiveContainsString method

 let string: NSString = "Café"
 let substring: NSString = "É"

 string.localizedCaseInsensitiveContainsString(substring) // true
2
  • 1
    This is good. No idea why they didn't have this method for ios 7
    – Lucas
    Jul 2, 2014 at 15:02
  • @Lucas, because Swift launched with iOS 8.0. but with swift you can still support the devices with iOS 7.
    – Hemang
    Sep 21, 2015 at 12:47
13

So personally I really hate NSNotFound but understand its necessity.

But some people may not understand the complexities of comparing against NSNotFound

For example, this code:

- (BOOL)doesString:(NSString*)string containString:(NSString*)otherString {
    if([string rangeOfString:otherString].location != NSNotFound)
        return YES;
    else
        return NO;
}

has its problems:

1) Obviously if otherString = nil this code will crash. a simple test would be:

NSLog(@"does string contain string - %@", [self doesString:@"hey" containString:nil] ? @"YES": @"NO");

results in !! CRASH !!

2) What is not so obvious to someone new to objective-c is that the same code will NOT crash when string = nil. For example, this code:

NSLog(@"does string contain string - %@", [self doesString:nil containString:@"hey"] ? @"YES": @"NO");

and this code:

NSLog(@"does string contain string - %@", [self doesString:nil containString:nil] ? @"YES": @"NO");

will both result in

does string contains string - YES

Which is clearly NOT what you want.

So the better solution that I believe works is to use the fact that rangeOfString returns the length of 0 so then a better more reliable code is this:

- (BOOL)doesString:(NSString*)string containString:(NSString*)otherString {
    if(otherString && [string rangeOfString:otherString].length)
        return YES;
    else
        return NO;
}

OR SIMPLY:

- (BOOL)doesString:(NSString*)string containString:(NSString*)otherString {
    return (otherString && [string rangeOfString:otherString].length);
}

which will for cases 1 and 2 will return

does string contains string - NO

That's my 2 cents ;-)

Please check out my Gist for more helpful code.

0
12

An improved version of P i's solution, a category on NSString, that not only will tell, if a string is found within another string, but also takes a range by reference, is:

@interface NSString (Contains)
-(BOOL)containsString: (NSString*)substring
              atRange:(NSRange*)range;

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring;
@end

@implementation NSString (Contains)

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring
              atRange:(NSRange *)range{

    NSRange r = [self rangeOfString : substring];
    BOOL found = ( r.location != NSNotFound );
    if (range != NULL) *range = r;
    return found;
}

-(BOOL)containsString:(NSString *)substring
{
    return [self containsString:substring
                        atRange:NULL];
}

@end

Use it like:

NSString *string = @"Hello, World!";

//If you only want to ensure a string contains a certain substring
if ([string containsString:@"ello" atRange:NULL]) {
    NSLog(@"YES");
}

// Or simply
if ([string containsString:@"ello"]) {
    NSLog(@"YES");
}

//If you also want to know substring's range
NSRange range;
if ([string containsString:@"ello" atRange:&range]) {
    NSLog(@"%@", NSStringFromRange(range));
}
0
8

Here is a copy-and-paste function snippet:

-(BOOL)Contains:(NSString *)StrSearchTerm on:(NSString *)StrText
{
    return [StrText rangeOfString:StrSearchTerm 
        options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location != NSNotFound;
}
1
  • May I know why I am downvoted ? It's a working code snippet Jul 8, 2015 at 6:05
7

Oneliner (Smaller amount of code. DRY, as you have only one NSLog):

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
NSLog(@"String %@", ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location == NSNotFound) ? @"not found" : @"cotains bla"); 
0
6
NSString *categoryString = @"Holiday Event";
if([categoryString rangeOfString:@"Holiday"].location == NSNotFound)
{
    //categoryString does not contains Holiday
}
else
{
    //categoryString contains Holiday
}
5

try this,

NSString *string = @"test Data";
if ([[string lowercaseString] rangeOfString:@"data"].location == NSNotFound) 
{
    NSLog(@"string does not contain Data");
}   
else 
{
    NSLog(@"string contains data!");
}
5

Best solution. As simple as this! If you want to find a word or part of the string. You can use this code. In this example we are going to check if the value of word contains "acter".

NSString *word =@"find a word or character here";
if ([word containsString:@"acter"]){
    NSLog(@"It contains acter");
} else {
     NSLog (@"It does not contain acter");
}
5

In Swift 4:

let a = "Hello, how are you?"
a.contains("Hello")   //will return true
4

If you need this once write:

NSString *stringToSearchThrough = @"-rangeOfString method finds and returns the range of the first occurrence of a given string within the receiver.";
BOOL contains = [stringToSearchThrough rangeOfString:@"occurence of a given string"].location != NSNotFound;
4

In case of swift, this can be used

let string = "Package #23"
if string.containsString("Package #") {
    //String contains substring
}
else {
    //String does not contain substring
}
2

If do not bother about case-sensitive string. Try this once.

NSString *string  = @"Hello World!";

if([string rangeOfString:@"hello" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location !=NSNotFound)
{
    NSLog(@"found");
}
else
{
    NSLog(@"not found");
}
1

Please use this code

NSString *string = @"hello bla bla";
if ([string rangeOfString:@"bla"].location == NSNotFound) 
{
    NSLog(@"string does not contain bla");
} 
else 
{  
    NSLog(@"string contains bla!");
}
1

Use the option NSCaseInsensitiveSearch with rangeOfString:options:

NSString *me = @"toBe" ;
NSString *target = @"abcdetobe" ;
NSRange range = [target  rangeOfString: me options: NSCaseInsensitiveSearch];
NSLog(@"found: %@", (range.location != NSNotFound) ? @"Yes" : @"No");
if (range.location != NSNotFound) {
// your code
}

Output result is found:Yes

The options can be "or'ed" together and include:

NSCaseInsensitiveSearch NSLiteralSearch NSBackwardsSearch and more

1

Try this:

Swift 4.1 , 4.2:

let stringData = "Black board"

//swift quick way and case sensitive
if stringData.contains("bla") {
    print("data contains string");
}

//case sensitive
if stringData.range(of: "bla",options: .caseInsensitive) != nil {
    print("data contains string");
}else {
    print("data does not contains string");
}

For Objective-C:

NSString *stringData = @"Black board";

//Quick way and case sensitive
if ([stringData containsString:@"bla"]) {
    NSLog(@"data contains string");
}

//Case Insensitive
if ([stringData rangeOfString:@"bla" options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch].location != NSNotFound) {
   NSLog(@"data contains string");
}else {
   NSLog(@"data does not contain string");
}
1

Swift 4 And Above

let str = "Hello iam midhun"

if str.contains("iam") {
  //contains substring
}
else {
  //doesn't contain substring
}

Objective-C

NSString *stringData = @"Hello iam midhun";

if ([stringData containsString:@"iam"]) {
    //contains substring
}
else {
    //doesn't contain substring
}
0

First string contain or not second string,

NSString *first = @"Banana";
NSString *second = @"BananaMilk";
NSRange range = [first rangeOfString:second options:NSCaseInsensitiveSearch];

if (range.length > 0) {
    NSLog(@"Detected");
}
else {
    NSLog(@"Not detected");
}
-2

If certain position of the string is needed, this code comes to place in Swift 3.0:

let string = "This is my string"
let substring = "my"

let position = string.range(of: substring)?.lowerBound
-3
-(Bool)checkIf:(NString)parentString containsSubstring:(NString)checkString {
    NSRange textRange =[parentString rangeOfString:checkString];
    return textRange.location != NSNotFound // returns true if parent string contains substring else returns false
  }
3
  • 2
    In Objective-C we have 'NSString` type. We don't have String type. Secondly, we have all the objects. So as an argument you should pass NSString. I vote for deletion due to the poor quality of an answer under highly active question. Dec 6, 2019 at 21:59
  • @AlekseyPotapov the idea is to give the logic rather than make the copy paste ready code.
    – iOS Nepal
    Mar 12 at 1:57
  • Please read "How to Answer" and "Explaining entirely code-based answers". It helps more if you supply an explanation why this is the preferred solution and explain how it works. We want to educate, not just provide code. Mar 20 at 23:08

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