69

Stream doesn't have a last() method:

Stream<T> stream;
T last = stream.last(); // No such method

What's the most elegant and/or efficient way to get the last element (or null for an empty Stream)?

  • 3
    If you need to find the last element of a Stream, you may want to reconsider your design and if you really want to be using a Stream. Streams are not necessarily ordered or finite. If your Stream is unordered, infinite, or both, the last element has no meaning. In my mind, the point of a Stream is to provide a layer of abstraction between data and how you process it. As such, a Stream itself does not need to know anything about the relative ordering of its elements. Finding the last element in a Stream is O(n). If you had a different data structure, it could be O(1). – Jeffrey Dec 21 '14 at 0:39
  • @jeff the need was real: the situation was roughly adding items to a shopping cart, each addition returned error info (certain combinations of items were not valid), but only the last addition's error info (when all items had been added and a fair assessment of the cart could be done) was the info needed. (Yes, the API we are using is broken and can not be fixed). – Bohemian Dec 21 '14 at 1:35
  • 14
    @BrianGoetz: Infinite streams don't have a well-defined count() either, but Stream still has a count() method. Really, that argument applies to any non-short-circuiting terminal operation on infinite streams. – Jeffrey Bosboom Dec 24 '14 at 0:11
  • @BrianGoetz I think streams should have last() method. There could be a survey on April 1st how it should be defined for infinite streams. I would propose: "It never returns and it utilizes at least one processor core at 100%. On parallel streams it is required to utilize all cores at 100%." – Vojta Apr 13 '17 at 19:47
109

Do a reduction that simply returns the current value:

Stream<T> stream;
T last = stream.reduce((a, b) -> b).orElse(null);
  • 1
    Would you say this was elegant, efficient or both? – Duncan Jones Dec 18 '14 at 13:24
  • 1
    @Duncan I think it's both, but I'm not yet a gun in java 8 and this need came up at work the other day - a junior pushed the stream onto a stack then popped it, and I thought this looked better, but there could be something even simpler out there. – Bohemian Dec 18 '14 at 13:35
  • 18
    For simplicity and elegance, this answer wins. And its reasonably efficient in the general case; it will parallelize reasonably well. For some stream sources that know their size, there's a faster way, but in most cases its not worth the extra code to save those few iterations. – Brian Goetz Dec 23 '14 at 15:14
  • 1
    @BrianGoetz how this will parallelize well? the last value will be unpredictable using a parallel stream – benez Feb 22 '17 at 1:45
  • 1
    @kewlbfy No, if the stream has a defined encounter order, parallel reduce will respect it. If the stream source splits cleanly, you'll get to the answer in O(lg n) time. – Brian Goetz Apr 13 '17 at 19:51
36
+100

This heavily depends on the nature of the Stream. Keep in mind that “simple” doesn’t necessarily mean “efficient”. If you suspect the stream to be very large, carrying heavy operations or having a source which knows the size in advance, the following might be substantially more efficient than the simple solution:

static <T> T getLast(Stream<T> stream) {
    Spliterator<T> sp=stream.spliterator();
    if(sp.hasCharacteristics(Spliterator.SIZED|Spliterator.SUBSIZED)) {
        for(;;) {
            Spliterator<T> part=sp.trySplit();
            if(part==null) break;
            if(sp.getExactSizeIfKnown()==0) {
                sp=part;
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    T value=null;
    for(Iterator<T> it=recursive(sp); it.hasNext(); )
        value=it.next();
    return value;
}

private static <T> Iterator<T> recursive(Spliterator<T> sp) {
    Spliterator<T> prev=sp.trySplit();
    if(prev==null) return Spliterators.iterator(sp);
    Iterator<T> it=recursive(sp);
    if(it!=null && it.hasNext()) return it;
    return recursive(prev);
}

You may illustrate the difference with the following example:

String s=getLast(
    IntStream.range(0, 10_000_000).mapToObj(i-> {
        System.out.println("potential heavy operation on "+i);
        return String.valueOf(i);
    }).parallel()
);
System.out.println(s);

It will print:

potential heavy operation on 9999999
9999999

In other words, it did not perform the operation on the first 9999999 elements but only on the last one.

  • 1
    What is the point of the hasCharacteristics() block? What value does it add that is not already covered by the recursive() method? The latter already navigates to the last split point. Furthermore, recursive() can never return null so you can remove the it != null check. – Gili Apr 10 '15 at 4:17
  • 1
    The recursive op may handle every case but is only a fall-back as it has a worse case of a recursion depth matching the number of (unfiltered!) elements. The ideal case is a SUBSIZED stream that can guaranty non-empty split halfs so we never need to go back to the left side. Note that in that case recursive won’t actually recurse as the trySplit has already proven to return null. – Holger Apr 10 '15 at 8:41
  • 2
    Of course, the code could have been written differently, and it was; I guess the null-check stems from an earlier version but then I discovered that for non-SUBSIZED streams you have to deal with possible empty split parts, i.e. you have to iterate to find out whether it has values, therefore I moved the Spliterators.iterator(…) call into a recursive method to be able to back up to the left side if the right side is empty. The loop is still the preferred operation. – Holger Apr 10 '15 at 8:44
  • 2
    Interesting solution. Note that according to current Stream API implementation your stream must be either parallel or directly connected to the source spliterator. Otherwise it will for some reason refuse to split even if underlying source spliterator splits. On the other hand you cannot blindly use parallel() as this may actually perform some operations (like sorting) in parallel unexpectedly consuming more CPU cores. – Tagir Valeev Sep 21 '15 at 8:48
  • 2
    @Tagir Valeev: right, the example code uses .parallel(), but indeed, it can have an effect on sorted() or distinct(). I don’t think, that there should be an effect for any of the other intermediate operations… – Holger Sep 21 '15 at 9:36
6

This is just a refactoring of Holger's answer because the code, while fantastic, is a bit hard to read/understand, especially for people who were not C programmers before Java. Hopefully my refactored example class is a little easier to follow for those who are not familiar with spliterators, what they do, or how they work.

public class LastElementFinderExample {
    public static void main(String[] args){
        String s = getLast(
            LongStream.range(0, 10_000_000_000L).mapToObj(i-> {
                System.out.println("potential heavy operation on "+i);
                return String.valueOf(i);
            }).parallel()
        );
        System.out.println(s);
    }

    public static <T> T getLast(Stream<T> stream){
        Spliterator<T> sp = stream.spliterator();
        if(isSized(sp)) {
            sp = getLastSplit(sp);
        }
        return getIteratorLastValue(getLastIterator(sp));
    }

    private static boolean isSized(Spliterator<?> sp){
        return sp.hasCharacteristics(Spliterator.SIZED|Spliterator.SUBSIZED);
    }

    private static <T> Spliterator<T> getLastSplit(Spliterator<T> sp){
        return splitUntil(sp, s->s.getExactSizeIfKnown() == 0);
    }

    private static <T> Iterator<T> getLastIterator(Spliterator<T> sp) {
        return Spliterators.iterator(splitUntil(sp, null));
    }

    private static <T> T getIteratorLastValue(Iterator<T> it){
        T result = null;
        while (it.hasNext()){
            result = it.next();
        }
        return result;
    }

    private static <T> Spliterator<T> splitUntil(Spliterator<T> sp, Predicate<Spliterator<T>> condition){
        Spliterator<T> result = sp;
        for (Spliterator<T> part = sp.trySplit(); part != null; part = result.trySplit()){
            if (condition == null || condition.test(result)){
                result = part;
            }
        }
        return result;      
    }   
}
2

Guava has Streams.findLast:

Stream<T> stream;
T last = Streams.findLast(stream);
  • And it performs much better than reduce((a, b) -> b) because it uses Spliterator.trySplit internally – ZhekaKozlov Jun 15 at 8:30
1

Here is another solution (not that efficient):

List<String> list = Arrays.asList("abc","ab","cc");
long count = list.stream().count();
list.stream().skip(count-1).findFirst().ifPresent(System.out::println);
  • Interesting... Did you test run this? Because there is no substream method, and even if there were this wouldn't work because count is a terminal operation. So what is the story behind this? – Lii Dec 18 '14 at 16:00
  • Strange, I don't know what jdk I have but it does have a substream. I have look at the oficial javadoc(docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/stream/Stream.html) and you are right, it doesn't appear here. – panagdu Dec 18 '14 at 16:10
  • I have updated the example with skip. – panagdu Dec 18 '14 at 16:28
  • 5
    Of course, you will have to check whether count==0 first as Stream.skip doesn’t like -1 as input. Besides that, the question didn’t say that you can acquire the Stream twice. Nor did it say that acquiring the Stream twice is guaranteed to get the same number of elements. – Holger Dec 18 '14 at 17:01
1

Parallel unsized streams with 'skip' methods are tricky and the @Holger's implementation gives a wrong answer. Also @Holger's implementation is a bit slower because it uses iterators.

An optimisation of @Holger answer:

public static <T> Optional<T> last(Stream<? extends T> stream) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(stream, "stream");

    Spliterator<? extends T> spliterator = stream.spliterator();
    Spliterator<? extends T> lastSpliterator = spliterator;

    // Note that this method does not work very well with:
    // unsized parallel streams when used with skip methods.
    // on that cases it will answer Optional.empty.

    // Find the last spliterator with estimate size
    // Meaningfull only on unsized parallel streams
    if(spliterator.estimateSize() == Long.MAX_VALUE) {
        for (Spliterator<? extends T> prev = spliterator.trySplit(); prev != null; prev = spliterator.trySplit()) {
            lastSpliterator = prev;
        }
    }

    // Find the last spliterator on sized streams
    // Meaningfull only on parallel streams (note that unsized was transformed in sized)
    for (Spliterator<? extends T> prev = lastSpliterator.trySplit(); prev != null; prev = lastSpliterator.trySplit()) {
        if (lastSpliterator.estimateSize() == 0) {
            lastSpliterator = prev;
            break;
        }
    }

    // Find the last element of the last spliterator
    // Parallel streams only performs operation on one element
    AtomicReference<T> last = new AtomicReference<>();
    lastSpliterator.forEachRemaining(last::set);

    return Optional.ofNullable(last.get());
}

Unit testing using junit 5:

@Test
@DisplayName("last sequential sized")
void last_sequential_sized() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed();
    stream = stream.skip(50_000).peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(9_950_000L);
}

@Test
@DisplayName("last sequential unsized")
void last_sequential_unsized() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed();
    stream = StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel());
    stream = stream.skip(50_000).peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(9_950_000L);
}

@Test
@DisplayName("last parallel sized")
void last_parallel_sized() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed().parallel();
    stream = stream.skip(50_000).peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(1);
}

@Test
@DisplayName("getLast parallel unsized")
void last_parallel_unsized() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed().parallel();
    stream = StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel());
    stream = stream.peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(1);
}

@Test
@DisplayName("last parallel unsized with skip")
void last_parallel_unsized_with_skip() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed().parallel();
    stream = StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel());
    stream = stream.skip(50_000).peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    // Unfortunately unsized parallel streams does not work very well with skip
    //assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    //assertThat(count).hasValue(1);

    // @Holger implementation gives wrong answer!!
    //assertThat(Streams.getLast(stream)).hasValue(9_950_000L); //!!!
    //assertThat(count).hasValue(1);

    // This is also not a very good answer better
    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).isEmpty();
    assertThat(count).hasValue(0);
}

The only solution to support both's scenarios is to avoid detecting the last spliterator on unsized parallel streams. The consequence is that the solution will perform operations on all elements but it will give always the right answer.

Note that in sequential streams, it will anyway perform operations on all elements.

public static <T> Optional<T> last(Stream<? extends T> stream) {
    Objects.requireNonNull(stream, "stream");

    Spliterator<? extends T> spliterator = stream.spliterator();

    // Find the last spliterator with estimate size (sized parallel streams)
    if(spliterator.hasCharacteristics(Spliterator.SIZED|Spliterator.SUBSIZED)) {
        // Find the last spliterator on sized streams (parallel streams)
        for (Spliterator<? extends T> prev = spliterator.trySplit(); prev != null; prev = spliterator.trySplit()) {
            if (spliterator.getExactSizeIfKnown() == 0) {
                spliterator = prev;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // Find the last element of the spliterator
    //AtomicReference<T> last = new AtomicReference<>();
    //spliterator.forEachRemaining(last::set);

    //return Optional.ofNullable(last.get());

    // A better one that supports native parallel streams
    return (Optional<T>) StreamSupport.stream(spliterator, stream.isParallel())
            .reduce((a, b) -> b);
}

With regard to the unit testing for that implementation, the first three tests are exactly the same (sequential & sized parallel). The tests for unsized parallel are here:

@Test
@DisplayName("last parallel unsized")
void last_parallel_unsized() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed().parallel();
    stream = StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel());
    stream = stream.peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(10_000_000L);
}

@Test
@DisplayName("last parallel unsized with skip")
void last_parallel_unsized_with_skip() throws Exception {
    long expected = 10_000_000L;
    AtomicLong count = new AtomicLong();
    Stream<Long> stream = LongStream.rangeClosed(1, expected).boxed().parallel();
    stream = StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel());
    stream = stream.skip(50_000).peek(num -> count.getAndIncrement());

    assertThat(Streams.last(stream)).hasValue(expected);
    assertThat(count).hasValue(9_950_000L);
}
  • Note that unit tests are using assertj library for better fluency. – Tet Oct 4 '17 at 10:34
  • 1
    The problem is that you are doing StreamSupport.stream(((Iterable<Long>) stream::iterator).spliterator(), stream.isParallel()), going through an Iterable detour that has no characteristics at all, in other words creates an unordered stream. Thus, the result has nothing to do with parallel or using skip, but just with the fact that “last” has no meaning for an unordered stream, so any element is a valid result. – Holger Oct 9 '17 at 20:37

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