50

I'm seeing some inconsistencies when using sys.getsizeof on what should be identical lists. (Python 2.7.5)

>>> lst = [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
>>> sys.getsizeof(lst)
76
>>> lst2 = list(lst)
>>> sys.getsizeof(lst2)
104
>>> lst3 = list(lst2)
>>> sys.getsizeof(lst3)
104
>>> sys.getsizeof(lst[:])
76
>>> sys.getsizeof(lst2[:])
76

Does anybody have a simple explanation?

  • 7
    I have a guess, backed by no evidence whatsoever: lists allocate extra memory ahead of time, so that future append operations have amortized O(1) complexity. Maybe the difference in sizes is because of different amounts of extra allocated memory. – Kevin Dec 18 '14 at 19:53
  • @Kevin, you are probably correct as using lst2 = lst[:] returns the same size – Padraic Cunningham Dec 18 '14 at 19:55
54

With a list literal, the VM creates the list with a set length. When passing a sequence to the list() constructor the elements are added one by one (via list.extend()) and as such the list is resized when appropriate. Since the resize operation overallocates in order to amortize the cost, the final list will usually be larger than the source list.

  • I feel embarrassed now for not figuring this out on my own. Thanks! – Mark Ransom Dec 18 '14 at 20:11
  • can you please explain the following a bit more ? Since the resize operation overallocates in order to amortize the cost, the final list will usually be larger than the source list thanks ! – Kasramvd Dec 18 '14 at 20:30
  • @Kasra: If you add 3 spaces but only fill 1 of them then the destination will have 2 more spaces than the source. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 18 '14 at 20:38
  • @IgnacioVazquez-Abrams so what about if we want to fill 4 space ? i mean how python do this risky task ? – Kasramvd Dec 18 '14 at 20:44
  • @Kasra: Once the fourth space needs to be filled, 4 additional spaces would allocated (hypothetically speaking) resulting in 4/7 usage. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Dec 18 '14 at 20:46
11

When you create a list literal, the size reported is the minimum size needed to hold the data. You can see this because the size jumps up if you append a single element. However, when you use list to copy it, it allocates some extra space - it takes a few appends before it reallocates (in your case, I suspect the 8th append will do it - it needs 4 more bytes per element). There is probably a reason why these allocation behaviors are different, but I'm not sure what that might be.

  • 1
    Thanks for suggesting append to gain an insight into the internal structure, it was very helpful. – Mark Ransom Dec 18 '14 at 20:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.