9

I am trying to convert an ObjC stackoverflow answer to Swift and failing. It looks like I am passing a UnsafeMutablePointer<mach_msg_type_number_t> when I should be passing an inout mach_msg_type_number_t and I can't seem to work out my problem. From what I understand of the Swift pointer documentation (not much) these should be interchangeable..?

Further info below.

Here's the Objective C:

struct task_basic_info info;
mach_msg_type_number_t size = sizeof(info);
kern_return_t kerr = task_info(mach_task_self(), TASK_BASIC_INFO, (task_info_t)&info, &size);

and here's as far as I got in Swift (many lines for easier type checking)

let name: task_name_t = mach_task_self_
let flavor: task_flavor_t = task_flavor_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO)
var info: mach_task_basic_info
var size: mach_msg_type_number_t = UnsignedFixed(sizeof(mach_task_basic_info_t))
let kerr = task_info(name, flavor, info as task_info_t, &size)

The task_info signature is:

func task_info(target_task: task_name_t, flavor: task_flavor_t, task_info_out: task_info_t, task_info_outCnt: UnsafeMutablePointer<mach_msg_type_number_t>) -> kern_return_t

and the error on the last line is:

Cannot convert the expression's type '(@!lvalue task_name_t, task_flavor_t, task_info_t, inout mach_msg_type_number_t)' to type 'kern_return_t'
12

When interacting with C functions, you can't rely on the compiler's error messages - break it down parameter by parameter, command-clicking until you know what you're working with. To start with, the types you're running into are:

  • task_name_t: UInt32
  • task_flavor_t: UInt32
  • task_info_t: UnsafeMutablePointer<Int32>
  • UnsafeMutablePointer<mach_msg_type_number_t>: UnsafeMutablePointer<UInt32>
  • kern_return_t - Int32

There's one tricky Swift bit along with a bug in your code standing in your way here. First, the task_info_out parameter needs to be a UnsafeMutablePointer<UInt32>, but needs to actually point to an instance of mach_task_basic_info. We can get around this by creating a UnsafeMutablePointer<mach_task_basic_info> and wrapping it in another UnsafeMutablePointer at call time - the compiler will use type inference to know we want that wrapping pointer to be sub-typed as UInt32.

Second, you're calling sizeof(mach_task_basic_info_t) (the pointer to mach_task_basic_info) when you should be calling sizeinfo(mach_task_basic_info), so your byte count ends up too low to hold the data structure.

On further research, this got a little more complicated. The original code for this was incorrect, in that size should be initialized to the constant MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT. Unfortunately, that's a macro, not a simple constant:

#define MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT (sizeof(mach_task_basic_info_data_t) / sizeof(natural_t)) 

Swift doesn't import those, so we'll need to redefine it ourselves. Here's working code for all this:

// constant
let MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT = (sizeof(mach_task_basic_info_data_t) / sizeof(natural_t))

// prepare parameters
let name   = mach_task_self_
let flavor = task_flavor_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO)
var size   = mach_msg_type_number_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT)

// allocate pointer to mach_task_basic_info
var infoPointer = UnsafeMutablePointer<mach_task_basic_info>.alloc(1)

// call task_info - note extra UnsafeMutablePointer(...) call
let kerr = task_info(name, flavor, UnsafeMutablePointer(infoPointer), &size)

// get mach_task_basic_info struct out of pointer
let info = infoPointer.move()

// deallocate pointer
infoPointer.dealloc(1)

// check return value for success / failure
if kerr == KERN_SUCCESS {
    println("Memory in use (in bytes): \(info.resident_size)")
} else {
    let errorString = String(CString: mach_error_string(kerr), encoding: NSASCIIStringEncoding)
    println(errorString ?? "Error: couldn't parse error string")
}
  • Just brilliant. Thank you very much. – tobygriffin Dec 21 '14 at 20:44
31

Took me a bit to update Airspeed Velocity's answer to the latest swift syntax (Swift 3, beta 6), but here is what I got:

func report_memory() {
    var info = mach_task_basic_info()
    let MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT = MemoryLayout<mach_task_basic_info>.stride/MemoryLayout<natural_t>.stride
    var count = mach_msg_type_number_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT)

    let kerr: kern_return_t = withUnsafeMutablePointer(to: &info) {
        $0.withMemoryRebound(to: integer_t.self, capacity: MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO_COUNT) {
            task_info(mach_task_self_,
                      task_flavor_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO),
                      $0,
                      &count)
        }
    }

    if kerr == KERN_SUCCESS {
        print("Memory in use (in bytes): \(info.resident_size)")
    }
    else {
        print("Error with task_info(): " +
            (String(cString: mach_error_string(kerr), encoding: String.Encoding.ascii) ?? "unknown error"))
    }
}

Hope that's helpful.

  • that really was – Thorax Sep 14 '16 at 10:52
  • Is info.resident_size memory used by this App, or total memory usage in the system? It is quite small only 26M so I guess it is the memory used by current App. – DàChún Oct 6 '17 at 14:51
  • Yes, it's the memory used by this process – Jerry Oct 10 '17 at 15:19
  • 5
    Would you help me understand how this value compares with the memory values shown by the debugger? I'm currently getting a resident_size of 106mb, but xcode is telling me I'm using 34mb with other processes using 1gb and 1gb free. – Adam Feb 1 '18 at 19:00
  • There's a WWDC video from a few years ago (probably on instruments) that talks about memory allocated to the app vs. to system processing on behalf of the app. Sorry, my memory is fuzzy on the topic. But I believe Xcode doesn't show that memory as used by the app, but this does, or something like that. – Jerry Feb 5 '18 at 16:40
9

Nate’s answer is excellent but there’s a tweak you can make to simplify it.

First, rather than allocating/deallocating the task_basic_info pointer, you can create the struct on the stack, then use withUnsafeMutablePointer to get a pointer directly to it which you can pass in.

func report_memory() {
    var info = mach_task_basic_info()
    var count = mach_msg_type_number_t(sizeofValue(info))/4

    let kerr: kern_return_t = withUnsafeMutablePointer(&info) {

        task_info(mach_task_self_,
            task_flavor_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO),
            task_info_t($0),
            &count)

    }

    if kerr == KERN_SUCCESS {
        println("Memory in use (in bytes): \(info.resident_size)")
    }
    else {
        println("Error with task_info(): " +
            (String.fromCString(mach_error_string(kerr)) ?? "unknown error"))
    }
}
  • what's with the /4 ? – Hogdotmac Apr 4 '18 at 8:26
3

Airspeed Velocity's answer in Swift 3...

func GetMemory()
{
    var info = mach_task_basic_info()
    var count = mach_msg_type_number_t(MemoryLayout.size(ofValue: info))/4

    let kerr: kern_return_t = withUnsafeMutablePointer(to: &info)
    {

        task_info(mach_task_self_,
                  task_flavor_t(MACH_TASK_BASIC_INFO),
                  $0.withMemoryRebound(to: Int32.self, capacity: 1) { zeroPtr in
                    task_info_t(zeroPtr)
                  },
                  &count)

    }

    if kerr == KERN_SUCCESS {
        print("Memory in use (in bytes): \(info.resident_size)")
    }
    else {
        print("Error with task_info(): " +
            (String.init(validatingUTF8: mach_error_string(kerr)) ?? "unknown error"))
    }
}

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