3

I have a doubt. When i declare a value and assign to some variable, I don't know how to reassign the same value to another variable. See the code snippet below.

#/bin/sh    
#declare ARG1 to a
a=ARG1
#declaring $a to ARG2    
ARG2=$`$a`

echo "ARG 2 = $ARG2"

It should display my output as

ARG 2 = ARG1

Help me out on this.


Here is my actual script.

#!/bin/sh

a=AA
b=BB
c=CC
d=DD
e=EE
f=FF

alpha_array=(a b c d e f)
process_array=(proc1 proc2 proc3 proc4)
array_1=("")
array_2=("")

display_array() {
echo "array1 = ${array_1[@]}"
echo "array2 = ${array_2[@]}"
}

checkarg() {
if [[ " ${alpha_array[*]} " == *" $token "* ]]; then
    echo "alphabet contains $token "
    array_1=("${array_1[@]}" "$token")
    $token=${$token}
    echo "TOKEN = $token"
elif [[ " ${process_array[*]} " == *" $token "* ]]; then
    echo "process contains $token "
    array_2=("${array_2[@]}" "$token")
else
echo "no matches found"
display_array
exit 1
fi
}

for token in $@
do
   echo $token
   checkarg
done

display_array

Here the below two lines

$token=${$token}
echo "TOKEN = $token"

should display my output as

TOKEN = AA
TOKEN = BB 

when i run my script with the following arguments.

./build.sh a b proc1

Kindly help me out on those 2 lines.

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  • I edited the title, as the question doesn't appear to have anything to do with declaring variables. (Variables can be declared in shell, but this is necessary to explicitly set types or scope metadata, rather than to assign values). – Charles Duffy Dec 18 '14 at 23:02
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Copy values between variables in bash script – jww Mar 12 '19 at 5:47
6

To assign the value associated with the variable arg2 to the variable a, you need simply run dest=$source:

a=ARG1
arg2=$a
echo "ARG 2 = $arg2"

The use of lower-case variable names for local shell variables is by convention, not necessity -- but this has the advantage of avoiding conflicts with environment variables and builtins, both of which use all-uppercase names by convention.

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  • Thanks for the answer. You got it right. Even i thought is that this much simple. But my i am posting my script here. Help me out here.. – Murthy Dec 18 '14 at 23:21
  • @NarayanamurthyBalasubramanian, I would hope that comparing what I'm doing against your script would be enough to make it clear: Change the line assigning ARG2 to ARG2=$a -- no extra unnecessary syntax. If this still doesn't answer your question, please clarify what you need to know. – Charles Duffy Dec 18 '14 at 23:29
  • I have changed my question and added few script lines. Help me out on this. – Murthy Dec 18 '14 at 23:31
  • Changing your question after a correct answer is given is not kosher. You should ask a new question in this case. – Charles Duffy Dec 18 '14 at 23:41
  • No worries. Please try to follow the guidelines at stackoverflow.com/help/mcve when constructing that question. – Charles Duffy Dec 18 '14 at 23:54
0

I know this is old, but I had a different kind of problem with assignment in bash:

whitespace.

I didn't know it's forbidden, so I tried doing ARG2 = $ARG1 and it just didn't work.

And all bash would say was:

./my-script: line 2: ARG2: command not found

I was sad for a while, but later I noticed that the same assignment elsewhere in my script works just fine. The only difference was the:

whitespace.

Changing it to ARG2=$ARG1 fixed it, and I stopped being sad.

Just thought I should share this in case anybody else got sad.

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