-8

I have the following JavaScript code, used to replace the code contained in a <div> of the page with a portion from another:

    function ReplaceContentInContainer(etiqueta) {
        var container = document.getElementById('contenedor');
        if (etiqueta="esTransportista") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('transportista').innerHTML;
        } else if (etiqueta="esCargador") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('cargador').innerHTML;
        }

    }

Then I call it from the page with the following code:

<input type='radio' name='esTransportista' id='esTransportista' value='1' onclick="javascript:ReplaceContentInContainer(esTransportista);">Es transportista <br />
<input type='radio' name='esTransportista' id='esCargador' value='0' onclick="javascript:ReplaceContentInContainer(esCargador);" checked>Es cargador <br />

And, finally, I have three <div>'s in my page, one to display the information < div id='contenedor'>< /div> and the other two containing the code to be displayed in this id='contenedor' I mentioned (being them <div id='transportista'>bla bla bla< /div> and < div id='cargador'>bla2 bla2 bla2< /div>).

The problem I face is that the JavaScript code seems to work just once. It changes the content of 'contenedor' the first time I check one of the radio buttons, but if I check the other one the JavaScript doesn't work anymore.

Is there any way I could make the JavaScript code work every time I click on any of the radio buttons?

I've been googling and most of the results I surfed refer to jQuery and bounding to elements that are vanished, but this is not my case, as far as I know...

closed as off-topic by Travis J, Henry Keiter, John Saunders, Ry- Dec 20 '14 at 5:08

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question was caused by a problem that can no longer be reproduced or a simple typographical error. While similar questions may be on-topic here, this one was resolved in a manner unlikely to help future readers. This can often be avoided by identifying and closely inspecting the shortest program necessary to reproduce the problem before posting." – Travis J, Henry Keiter, John Saunders, Ry-
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2

Just doing a quick scan of you code and saw that your if (etiqueta="esTransportista") statement is incorrect. When comparing two objects you need the ==

Try

  function ReplaceContentInContainer(etiqueta) {
        var container = document.getElementById('contenedor');
        if (etiqueta=="esTransportista") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('transportista').innerHTML;
        } else if (etiqueta=="esCargador") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('cargador').innerHTML;
        }

    }
  • === is preferable to ==. – JLRishe Dec 19 '14 at 20:03
  • 1
    @JLRishe – That really depends on the context. For those wondering, a === call is a type-dependent exact match, while == is a non-type-dependent soft match. 'true' == true returns true, 'true' === true returns false. – Josh Burgess Dec 19 '14 at 20:12
  • 1
    @JoshBurgess No, it doesn't really depend on the context. =='s behavior is bizarre and hard to predict, and the prevailing wisdom is to never use it (stackoverflow.com/a/359509/1945651). And FYI, 'true' == true evaluates to false. See what I mean about it being hard to predict? – JLRishe Dec 19 '14 at 20:19
  • A bit of a side note, but this answer is incomplete. – JLRishe Dec 19 '14 at 20:39
2

Your javascript has a small error:

function ReplaceContentInContainer(etiqueta) {
        var container = document.getElementById('contenedor');
        if (etiqueta == "esTransportista") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('transportista').innerHTML;
        } else if (etiqueta == "esCargador") {
            container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('cargador').innerHTML;
        }
    }

Notice in the if statement you had etiqueta = "esTransportista". That would make it save "esTransportista" to etiqueta and it would go into that part of the if statement.

By changing the = to == you compare to see if it is true.

EDIT

You should also change in your onclick="..." sections to put the names in single quotes:

onclick="javascript:ReplaceContentInContainer('esTransportista');"
onclick="javascript:ReplaceContentInContainer('esCargador');" 

That ensures that the javascript does not look for variables with those names and knows that you are passing strings.

  • This answer is incomplete. – JLRishe Dec 19 '14 at 20:40
2

There are two things preventing your code from working correctly:

  • You are passing undefined variables to your function instead of strings
  • You are using = where you should be using ===

The JavaScript expression you are using in your click handler is this:

ReplaceContentInContainer(esTransportista);

here, esTransportista is a variable reference, but since you don't have a variable with that name, the value undefined is passed to your function.

Inside your function, etiqueta has the value undefined, but when this if statement executes

if (etiqueta = "esTransportista") {
    container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('transportista').innerHTML;
}

the asssignment operator = assigns the value "esTransportista" to etiqueta, and then this value is passed onto the if statement. "esTransportista" is "truthy", so the body of that if block will always run.


To get your code to work as expected,

  1. Pass string values to your function, not undefined variables:
ReplaceContentInContainer("esTransportista")  // note the quotes here    
ReplaceContentInContainer("esCargador")  // note the quotes here    
  1. Use the === operator to compare a variable against a value:
if (etiqueta === "esTransportista") {
    container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('transportista').innerHTML;
} else if (etiqueta === "esCargador") {
    container.innerHTML = document.getElementById('cargador').innerHTML;
}

jsfiddle


As one additional (albeit optional) improvement. I suggest setting up your click handlers in your code, not putting them in your HTML. One way to do so (without getting too fancy) would look like this:

window.onload = function () {
    document.getElementById("esTransportista").onclick = function () {
        ReplaceContentInContainer("esTransportista");
    };

    document.getElementById("esCargador").onclick = function () {
        ReplaceContentInContainer("esCargador"); 
    };
};

If you put that in your code, you can remove the onclick attributes on your radio buttons and leave them as:

<input type='radio' name='esTransportista' id='esTransportista' value='1'>Es transportista
<br />
<input type='radio' name='esTransportista' id='esCargador' value='0' checked>Es cargador
<br />

jsfiddle

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