0

This question already has an answer here:

Here is my code:

public class StackStudy{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Stack<String> st = new Stack<String>();
        st.push("hi");
        st.push("bye");
        st.push("awful");
        System.out.println(st.toString());
    }
}

and console prints out this:

[hi, bye, awful]

I thought using toString will get rid of the [], why is it still there?

EDIT: If toString is not the proper way to get rid of[], what is the right way to do it?

marked as duplicate by Falmarri, Luiggi Mendoza java Dec 19 '14 at 21:15

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 14
    Why did you think toString would get rid of the brackets? – Alexis King Dec 19 '14 at 21:09
  • 2
    It's the default implementation. – Alexis C. Dec 19 '14 at 21:09
  • 1
    It is hard coded in the source code. A proper way? Create an own method that prints the content. – Tom Dec 19 '14 at 21:12
  • 2
    Don't use toString() to rely on a specific output format – Falmarri Dec 19 '14 at 21:14
  • 1
    I would opt for this answer in the dup Q/A. – Luiggi Mendoza Dec 19 '14 at 21:16
2

Because the toString() method of Vector (or possibly AbstractCollection) includes the brackets (and Stack inherits that toString()). You could remove them by taking the substring like

String str = st.toString();
System.out.println(str.substring(1, str.length() - 1));
  • 1
    The brackets are from AbstractCollection, not Vector :P. – Tom Dec 19 '14 at 21:17
0

overriding toString() gives you full control over what get's returned. Therefor, you can skip the brackets. However, you've only called the toString() method (which is actually what the System.out.println() is actually doing as well. Therefor, the outcome is as expected.

0

The following code would do the trick.

public class StackStudy{
    public static void main(String[] args){
        Stack<String> st = new Stack<String>();
        st.push("hi");
        st.push("bye");
        st.push("awful");
        String stackAsString = st.toString();
        System.out.println(stackAsString.substring(1, stackAsString.length() - 1));
    }
 }
  • tried but not working, not sure I understood this part: String stackAsString = st.toString(); System.out.println(stackAsString.substring(1, stackAsString.length() - 1)); – OPK Dec 19 '14 at 21:25

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