4

I'm learning to apply MVP to a simple WinForms app (only one form) in C# and encountered an issue while creating the main presenter in static void Main(). Is it a good idea to expose a View from the Presenter in order to supply it as a parameter to Application.Run()?

Currently, I've implemented an approach which allows me to not expose the View as a property of Presenter:

    static void Main()
    {
        IView view = new View();
        Model model = new Model();
        Presenter presenter = new Presenter(view, model);
        presenter.Start();
        Application.Run();
    }

The Start and Stop methods in Presenter:

    public void Start()
    {
        view.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        view.Stop();
    }

The Start and Stop methods in View (a Windows Form):

    public void Start()
    {
        this.Show();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        // only way to close a message loop called 
        // via Application.Run(); without a Form parameter
        Application.Exit();
    }

The Application.Exit() call seems like an inelegant way to close the Form (and the application). The other alternative would be to expose the View as a public property of the Presenter in order to call Application.Run() with a Form parameter.

    static void Main()
    {
        IView view = new View();
        Model model = new Model();
        Presenter presenter = new Presenter(view, model);
        Application.Run(presenter.View);
    }

The Start and Stop methods in Presenter remain the same. An additional property is added to return the View as a Form:

    public void Start()
    {
        view.Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        view.Stop();
    }

    // New property to return view as a Form for Application.Run(Form form);
    public System.Windows.Form View
    {
        get { return view as Form(); }
    }

The Start and Stop methods in View (a Windows Form) would then be written as below:

    public void Start()
    {
        this.Show();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        this.Close();
    }

Could anyone suggest which is the better approach and why? Or there even better ways to resolve this issue?

  • I thank Roger, Heinzi and Nicole for their valuable inputs but I chose Heinzi's answer finally because I've adapted his answer for my actual application using two additional interfaces IMainPresenter and IMainView. – anonymous May 12 '10 at 3:29
9
+100

What about the following:

// view
public void StartApplication() // implements IView.StartApplication
{ 
    Application.Run((Form)this);
}

// presenter
public void StartApplication()
{
    view.StartApplication();
}

// main
static void Main()     
{     
    IView view = new View();     
    Model model = new Model();     
    Presenter presenter = new Presenter(view, model);     
    presenter.StartApplication();     
}     

That way, you don't need to expose the view to the outside. In addition, the view and the presenter know that this view has been started as a "main form", which might be a useful piece of information.

  • 1
    IMO, Neither of the presenter or the view interfaces should know how to kickstart the windows message pump. You would only bloat the IView interface with a method that doesn't have to exist, that you would have to implement if you are writing tests against fake views. – Roger Johansson May 5 '10 at 15:26
  • 1
    Would creating another interface for the view and presenter e.g IMainView, IMainPresenter to specifically handle only StartApplication() and StopApplication(). So View will implement Iview and IMainView, Presenter will implement IMainPresenter. – anonymous May 7 '10 at 1:34
  • 1
    @Mr Roys: That's a nice idea. You could even make IMainView and IMainPresenter subinterfaces of IView and IPresenter, since an IMainView will always be an IView (same for Presenter). – Heinzi May 7 '10 at 5:37
5

I would go for the second approach. You could also get rid of the extra property by simply casting view to form in the void Main, since you know it is a form anyway at that point (I see no reason to make it more generic than that since it just starts the winform app)

Application.Run(view as Form);
1

Things get a bit more complex if you allow more than one way to exit the application (e.g.: a menu item for exiting), or if you prevent closing of the application under certain conditions. In either case, the actual invocation of application closing should usually be invoked from presenter code rather than by simply closing the concrete view. This can be accomplished by using either the Application.Run() or Application.Run(ApplicationContext) overloads and exposing the application exit action via inversion of control.

The exact approach to registering and using the application exit action would depend on the IoC mechanism (e.g.: service locator and/or dependency injection) that you are using. Since you haven't mentioned what your current IoC approach might be, here's a sample that's independent of any particular IoC frameworks:

internal static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    private static void Main()
    {
        ApplicationActions.ExitApplication = Application.Exit;

        MainPresenter mainPresenter = new MainPresenter(new MainView(), new Model());
        mainPresenter.Start();

        Application.Run(); 
    }
}

public static class ApplicationActions
{
    public static Action ExitApplication { get; internal set; }
}

public class MainPresenter : Presenter
{
    //...

    public override void Stop()
    {
        base.Stop();

        ApplicationActions.ExitApplication();
    }
}

This basic approach could be adapted quite easily to your preferred IoC approach. For example, if you're using a service locator, you would probably want to consider removing at least the setter on the ApplicationActions.ExitApplication property, and storing the delegate in the service locator instead. If the ExitApplication getter were to remain, it would provide a simple façade to the service locator instance retriever. e.g.:

public static Action ExitApplication
{
    get
    {
        return ServiceLocator.GetInstance<Action>("ExitApplication");
    }
}
  • Originally, I intended to place the Application.Exit() in presenter.Stop() but then decided against it because that would create a dependency on the technology used to implement the view e.g WinForms within the presenter. I'll look into IoC in the meantime - any way to illustrate it with some pseudocode? – anonymous May 7 '10 at 1:28
  • For which portions of the implementation would you like an example? – Nicole Calinoiu May 11 '10 at 13:53
  • The IoC part for the Application.Exit() section would be nice. Thanks! – anonymous May 12 '10 at 2:04
  • I've added a code sample to the answer above. Given that you mentioned above that you chose to go with a MainPresenter, IMainView approach, I've incorporated that choice to allow the presenter to know that it ought to exit the application as part of its stopping. – Nicole Calinoiu May 12 '10 at 12:44
  • Hi Nicole, sorry that I did not wait for your sample code before deciding on the accepted answer as I had to go onsite that day. Thank you for the sample code, much appreciated :) – anonymous May 15 '10 at 8:43
0

You could do it in a hundred ways to achieve the ultimate goal of separability of concerns. There is no hard and fast rule here, the basic idea is that presenter deals with presentation logic of the view, while the view has only the dumb knowledge of its own GUI specific classes and stuffs. Some ways I can think of (to broadly put):

1) View kick-starts things and let it decide its presenter. You start like, new View().Start();

// your reusable MVP framework project 
public interface IPresenter<V>
{
    V View { get; set; }
}
public interface IView<P>
{
    P Presenter { get; }
}
public static class PresenterFactory
{
    public static P Presenter<P>(this IView<P> view) where P : new()
    {
        var p = new P();
        (p as dynamic).View = view;
        return p;
    }
}

// your presentation project
public interface IEmployeeView : IView<EmployeePresenter>
{
    void OnSave(); // some view method
}
public class EmployeePresenter : IPresenter<IEmployeeView>
{
    public IEmployeeView View { get; set; } // enforced

    public void Save()
    {
        var employee = new EmployeeModel
        {
            Name = View.Bla // some UI element property on IEmployeeView interface
        };
        employee.Save();
    }
}

// your view project
class EmployeeView : IEmployeeView
{
    public EmployeePresenter Presenter { get; } // enforced

    public EmployeeView()
    {
        Presenter = this.Presenter(); // type inference magic
    }

    public void OnSave()
    {
        Presenter.Save();
    }
}

A variant of the above approach would be to enforce stronger generic constraint on view and presenter, but I dont think the complexity outweighs the benefits. Something like this:

// your reusable MVP framework project 
public interface IPresenter<P, V> where P : IPresenter<P, V> where V : IView<P, V>
{
    V View { get; set; }
}
public interface IView<P, V> where P : IPresenter<P, V> where V : IView<P, V>
{
    P Presenter { get; }
}
public static class PresenterFactory
{
    public static P Presenter<P, V>(this IView<P, V> view)
        where P : IPresenter<P, V>, new() where V : IView<P, V>
    {
        return new P { View = (V)view };
    }
}

// your presentation project
public interface IEmployeeView : IView<EmployeePresenter, IEmployeeView>
{
    //...
}
public class EmployeePresenter : IPresenter<EmployeePresenter, IEmployeeView>
{
    //...
}

Disadvantages

  • interacting between forms are less intuitive to me.

Steps involved:

  • implement IEmployeeView
  • instantiate presenter by calling PresenterFactory and passing this from the view constructor
  • ensure view events are wired to their corresponding presenter methods
  • start off, like new EmployeeView()....

2) Presenter kick-starts things and let it decide its view. You start like, new Presenter().Start();

In this approach presenter instantiates its own view (like approach 1) by means of some dependenchy injection or so, or view can be passed to presenter's constructor. E.g.

// your reusable MVP framework project 
public abstract class IPresenter<V> // OK may be a better name here
{
    protected V View { get; }

    protected IPresenter()
    {
        View = ...; // dependenchy injection or some basic reflection, or pass in view to ctor
        (View as dynamic).Presenter = this;
    }
}
public interface IView<P>
{
    P Presenter { get; set; }
}

// your presentation project
public interface IEmployeeView : IView<EmployeePresenter>
{
    void OnSave(); // some view method
}
public class EmployeePresenter : IPresenter<IEmployeeView>
{
    public void Save()
    {
        var employee = new EmployeeModel
        {
            Name = View.Bla // some UI element property on IEmployeedView interface
        };
        employee.Save();
    }
}

// your view project
class EmployeeView : IEmployeeView
{
    public EmployeePresenter Presenter { get; set; } // enforced

    public void OnSave()
    {
        Presenter.Save();
    }
}

Steps involved:

  • implement IEmployeeView
  • ensure view events are wired to their corresponding presenter methods
  • start off, like new EmployeePresenter(....

3) Event based, observer style

Here you could either encapsulate presenter in view (instantiate presenter in view) like approach 1 or encapsulate view in presenter (instantiate view in presenter) like approach 2 but in my experience latter will always be the cleaner design to work with. An e.g. of latter:

// your reusable MVP framework project
public abstract class IPresenter<V> where V : IView
{
    protected V View { get; }

    protected IPresenter()
    {
        View = ...; // dependenchy injection or some basic reflection, or pass in view to ctor
        WireEvents();
    }

    protected abstract void WireEvents();
}

// your presentation project
public interface IEmployeeView : IView
{
    // events helps in observing
    event Action OnSave; // for e.g.
}
public class EmployeePresenter : IPresenter<IEmployeeView>
{
    protected override void WireEvents()
    {
        View.OnSave += OnSave;
    }

    void OnSave()
    {
        var employee = new EmployeeModel
        {
            Name = View.Bla // some UI element property on IEmployeedView interface
        };
        employee.Save();
    }
}

// your view project
class EmployeeView : IEmployeeView
{
    public event Action OnSave;
    void OnClicked(object sender, EventArgs e) // some event handler
    {
        OnSave();
    }
}
// you kick off like new EmployeePresenter()....

Disadvantage:

  • You have to wire events on both view and presenter sides - double the work

Steps involved:

  • implement IEmployeeView
  • ensure iview events are called from view event handler methods
  • ensure iview event members are initialized from presenter
  • start off, like new EmployeePresenter()....

Limitations of language sometimes make design patterns more difficult. For e.g, had multiple inheritance been possible in C#, it was only a matter of having an abstract base view class with all the implementation details except UI specific components which could be then implemented by view class. No presenters, classic polymorphism and dead simple! Unfortunately this is not possible since most view classes in .NET (like Form of WinForms) already inherits from a super view class. So we have to implement an interface and go for composition. Also, C# doesnt let you have non-public members in an interface implementation, so we are forced to make all members specified in IEmployeeView public which breaks the natural encapsulation rules of the view class (i.e. other views in the view project can see details of EmployeeView irrelevant to them). Anyway, using power of C#'s extension methods a much simpler but very limited approach can be taken.

4) Extension method approach

This is just silly.

// your presentation project
public interface IEmployeeView
{
    void OnSave(); // some view method
}
public static class EmployeePresenter // OK may need a better name
{
    public void Save(this IEmployeeView view)
    {
        var employee = new EmployeeModel
        {
            Name = view.Bla // some UI element property on IEmployeedView interface
        };
        employee.Save();
    }
}

// your view project
class EmployeeView : IEmployeeView
{       
    public void OnSave()
    {
        this.Save(); // that's it. power of extensions.
    }
}

Disadvantages:

  • fairly unusable for anything remotely complex

Steps involved:

  • implement IEmployeeView
  • ensure this.... extension method is called from view events
  • kick off things by calling new View...

Of all 2 and 3 look better to me.

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