87

I'm looking for an ExecutorService implementation that can be provided with a timeout. Tasks that are submitted to the ExecutorService are interrupted if they take longer than the timeout to run. Implementing such a beast isn't such a difficult task, but I'm wondering if anybody knows of an existing implementation.

Here's what I came up with based on some of the discussion below. Any comments?

import java.util.List;
import java.util.concurrent.*;

public class TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor extends ThreadPoolExecutor {
    private final long timeout;
    private final TimeUnit timeoutUnit;

    private final ScheduledExecutorService timeoutExecutor = Executors.newSingleThreadScheduledExecutor();
    private final ConcurrentMap<Runnable, ScheduledFuture> runningTasks = new ConcurrentHashMap<Runnable, ScheduledFuture>();

    public TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue, long timeout, TimeUnit timeoutUnit) {
        super(corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue);
        this.timeout = timeout;
        this.timeoutUnit = timeoutUnit;
    }

    public TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue, ThreadFactory threadFactory, long timeout, TimeUnit timeoutUnit) {
        super(corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue, threadFactory);
        this.timeout = timeout;
        this.timeoutUnit = timeoutUnit;
    }

    public TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue, RejectedExecutionHandler handler, long timeout, TimeUnit timeoutUnit) {
        super(corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue, handler);
        this.timeout = timeout;
        this.timeoutUnit = timeoutUnit;
    }

    public TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor(int corePoolSize, int maximumPoolSize, long keepAliveTime, TimeUnit unit, BlockingQueue<Runnable> workQueue, ThreadFactory threadFactory, RejectedExecutionHandler handler, long timeout, TimeUnit timeoutUnit) {
        super(corePoolSize, maximumPoolSize, keepAliveTime, unit, workQueue, threadFactory, handler);
        this.timeout = timeout;
        this.timeoutUnit = timeoutUnit;
    }

    @Override
    public void shutdown() {
        timeoutExecutor.shutdown();
        super.shutdown();
    }

    @Override
    public List<Runnable> shutdownNow() {
        timeoutExecutor.shutdownNow();
        return super.shutdownNow();
    }

    @Override
    protected void beforeExecute(Thread t, Runnable r) {
        if(timeout > 0) {
            final ScheduledFuture<?> scheduled = timeoutExecutor.schedule(new TimeoutTask(t), timeout, timeoutUnit);
            runningTasks.put(r, scheduled);
        }
    }

    @Override
    protected void afterExecute(Runnable r, Throwable t) {
        ScheduledFuture timeoutTask = runningTasks.remove(r);
        if(timeoutTask != null) {
            timeoutTask.cancel(false);
        }
    }

    class TimeoutTask implements Runnable {
        private final Thread thread;

        public TimeoutTask(Thread thread) {
            this.thread = thread;
        }

        @Override
        public void run() {
            thread.interrupt();
        }
    }
}
  • Is that 'start time' of the timeout the time of submission? Or the time the task begins executing? – Tim Bender May 3 '10 at 14:18
  • Good question. When it begins executing. Presumably using the protected void beforeExecute(Thread t, Runnable r) hook. – Edward Dale May 3 '10 at 14:20
  • @scompt.com are you still using this solution or has it been superceded – Paul Taylor Nov 29 '14 at 20:43
  • @PaulTaylor The job where I implemented this solution has been superceded. :-) – Edward Dale Dec 1 '14 at 8:53
  • I need exactly this, except a) I need my main scheduler service to be a thread pool with a single service thread since need my tasks to execute strictly concurrently and b) I need to be able to specify the timeout duration for each task at the time the task is submitted. I have tried using this as a starting point but extending ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, but I cannot see a way to get the timeout duration specified that is to be specified at task submission time through to the beforeExecute method. Any suggestions gratefully appreciated! – Michael Ellis Feb 16 '17 at 14:23
84

You can use a ScheduledExecutorService for this. First you would submit it only once to begin immediately and retain the future that is created. After that you can submit a new task that would cancel the retained future after some period of time.

 ScheduledExecutorService executor = Executors.newScheduledThreadPool(2); 
 final Future handler = executor.submit(new Callable(){ ... });
 executor.schedule(new Runnable(){
     public void run(){
         handler.cancel();
     }      
 }, 10000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);

This will execute your handler (main functionality to be interrupted) for 10 seconds, then will cancel (i.e. interrupt) that specific task.

  • 11
    Interesting idea, but what if the task finishes before the timeout (which it normally will)? I'd rather not have tons of cleanup tasks waiting to run only to find out their assigned task has already completed. There'd need to be another thread monitoring the Futures as they finish to remove their cleanup tasks. – Edward Dale May 3 '10 at 15:18
  • 3
    The executor will only schedule this cancel once. If the task is completed then the cancel is a no op and work continues unchanged. There only needs to be one extra thread scheudling to cancel the tasks and one thread to run them. You could have two executors, one to submit your main tasks and one to cancel them. – John Vint May 3 '10 at 15:23
  • 3
    That's true, but what if the timeout is 5 hours and in that time 10k tasks are executed. I'd like to avoid having all those no-ops lying around taking up memory and causing context switches. – Edward Dale May 3 '10 at 15:27
  • 1
    @Scompt Not necessarily. There would be 10k future.cancel() invocations, however if the future is completed then the cancel will fast path out and not do any uneccesary work. If you do not want 10k extra cancel invocations then this may not work, but the amount of work done when a task is completed is very small. – John Vint May 3 '10 at 15:33
  • 5
    @John W.: I just realized another issue with your implementation. I need the timeout to begin when the task starts execution, as I commented earlier. I think the only way to do that is to use the beforeExecute hook. – Edward Dale May 3 '10 at 16:28
6

Unfortunately the solution is flawed. There is a sort of bug with ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor, also reported in this question: cancelling a submitted task does not fully release the memory resources associated with the task; the resources are released only when the task expires.

If you therefore create a TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor with a fairly long expiration time (a typical usage), and submit tasks fast enough, you end up filling the memory - even though the tasks actually completed successfully.

You can see the problem with the following (very crude) test program:

public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
    ExecutorService service = new TimeoutThreadPoolExecutor(1, 1, 10, TimeUnit.SECONDS, 
            new LinkedBlockingQueue<Runnable>(), 10, TimeUnit.MINUTES);
    //ExecutorService service = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(1);
    try {
        final AtomicInteger counter = new AtomicInteger();
        for (long i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
            service.submit(new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    counter.incrementAndGet();
                }
            });
            if (i % 10000 == 0) {
                System.out.println(i + "/" + counter.get());
                while (i > counter.get()) {
                    Thread.sleep(10);
                }
            }
        }
    } finally {
        service.shutdown();
    }
}

The program exhausts the available memory, although it waits for the spawned Runnables to complete.

I though about this for a while, but unfortunately I could not come up with a good solution.

EDIT: I found out this issue was reported as JDK bug 6602600, and appears to have been fixed very recently.

4

Wrap the task in FutureTask and you can specify timeout for the FutureTask. Look at the example in my answer to this question,

java native Process timeout

  • 1
    I realize there are a couple ways to do this using the java.util.concurrent classes, but I'm looking for an ExecutorService implementation. – Edward Dale May 3 '10 at 14:56
  • 1
    If you are saying that you want your ExecutorService to hide the fact that timeouts are being added from client code, you could implement your own ExecutorService that wraps every runnable handed to it with a FutureTask before executing them. – erikprice Sep 24 '10 at 15:23
1

How about using the ExecutorService.shutDownNow() method as described in http://docs.oracle.com/javase/7/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ExecutorService.html? It seems to be the simplest solution.

  • 8
    Because it will stop all the scheduled tasks and not a specific task as was requested by the question – MikeL Aug 27 '13 at 6:27
1

It seems problem is not in JDK bug 6602600 ( it was solved at 2010-05-22), but in incorrect call of sleep(10) in circle. Addition note, that the main Thread must give directly CHANCE to other threads to realize thier tasks by invoke SLEEP(0) in EVERY branch of outer circle. It is better, I think, to use Thread.yield() instead of Thread.sleep(0)

The result corrected part of previous problem code is such like this:

.......................
........................
Thread.yield();         

if (i % 1000== 0) {
System.out.println(i + "/" + counter.get()+ "/"+service.toString());
}

//                
//                while (i > counter.get()) {
//                    Thread.sleep(10);
//                } 

It works correctly with amount of outer counter up to 150 000 000 tested circles.

1

After ton of time to survey,
Finally, I use invokeAll method of ExecutorService to solve this problem.
That will strictly interrupt the task while task running.
Here is example

ExecutorService executorService = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

try {
    List<Callable<Object>> callables = new ArrayList<>();
    // Add your long time task (callable)
    callables.add(new VaryLongTimeTask());
    // Assign tasks for specific execution timeout (e.g. 2 sec)
    List<Future<Object>> futures = executorService.invokeAll(callables, 2000, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    for (Future<Object> future : futures) {
        // Getting result
    }
} catch (InterruptedException e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

executorService.shutdown();

The pro is you can also submit ListenableFuture at the same ExecutorService.
Just slightly change the first line of code.

ListeningExecutorService executorService = MoreExecutors.listeningDecorator(Executors.newCachedThreadPool());

ListeningExecutorService is the Listening feature of ExecutorService at google guava project (com.google.guava) )

  • 2
    Thanks for pointing out invokeAll. That works very well. Just a word of caution for anyone thinking about using this: although invokeAll returns a list of Future objects, it actually seems to be a blocking operation. – mxro Nov 16 '16 at 8:40
1

Using John W answer I created an implementation that correctly begin the timeout when the task starts its execution. I even write a unit test for it :)

However, it does not suit my needs since some IO operations do not interrupt when Future.cancel() is called (ie when Thread.interrupted() is called). Some examples of IO operation that may not be interrupted when Thread.interrupted() is called are Socket.connect and Socket.read (and I suspect most of IO operation implemented in java.io). All IO operations in java.nio should be interruptible when Thread.interrupted() is called. For example, that is the case for SocketChannel.open and SocketChannel.read.

Anyway if anyone is interested, I created a gist for a thread pool executor that allows tasks to timeout (if they are using interruptible operations...): https://gist.github.com/amanteaux/64c54a913c1ae34ad7b86db109cbc0bf

  • Interesting code, I pulled it into my system and curious if you have some examples of what kind of IO operations will not interrupt so I can see if it will impact my system. Thanks! – Duncan Krebs May 10 at 8:36
  • @DuncanKrebs I detailed my answer with an example of non interruptible IO: Socket.connect and Socket.read – amanteaux May 11 at 17:41
0

What about this alternative idea :

  • two have two executors :
    • one for :
      • submitting the task, without caring about the timeout of the task
      • adding the Future resulted and the time when it should end to an internal structure
    • one for executing an internal job which is checking the internal structure if some tasks are timeout and if they have to be cancelled.

Small sample is here :

public class AlternativeExecutorService 
{

private final CopyOnWriteArrayList<ListenableFutureTask> futureQueue       = new CopyOnWriteArrayList();
private final ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor                scheduledExecutor = new ScheduledThreadPoolExecutor(1); // used for internal cleaning job
private final ListeningExecutorService                   threadExecutor    = MoreExecutors.listeningDecorator(Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5)); // used for
private ScheduledFuture scheduledFuture;
private static final long INTERNAL_JOB_CLEANUP_FREQUENCY = 1000L;

public AlternativeExecutorService()
{
    scheduledFuture = scheduledExecutor.scheduleAtFixedRate(new TimeoutManagerJob(), 0, INTERNAL_JOB_CLEANUP_FREQUENCY, TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
}

public void pushTask(OwnTask task)
{
    ListenableFuture<Void> future = threadExecutor.submit(task);  // -> create your Callable
    futureQueue.add(new ListenableFutureTask(future, task, getCurrentMillisecondsTime())); // -> store the time when the task should end
}

public void shutdownInternalScheduledExecutor()
{
    scheduledFuture.cancel(true);
    scheduledExecutor.shutdownNow();
}

long getCurrentMillisecondsTime()
{
    return Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.MILLISECOND);
}

class ListenableFutureTask
{
    private final ListenableFuture<Void> future;
    private final OwnTask                task;
    private final long                   milliSecEndTime;

    private ListenableFutureTask(ListenableFuture<Void> future, OwnTask task, long milliSecStartTime)
    {
        this.future = future;
        this.task = task;
        this.milliSecEndTime = milliSecStartTime + task.getTimeUnit().convert(task.getTimeoutDuration(), TimeUnit.MILLISECONDS);
    }

    ListenableFuture<Void> getFuture()
    {
        return future;
    }

    OwnTask getTask()
    {
        return task;
    }

    long getMilliSecEndTime()
    {
        return milliSecEndTime;
    }
}

class TimeoutManagerJob implements Runnable
{
    CopyOnWriteArrayList<ListenableFutureTask> getCopyOnWriteArrayList()
    {
        return futureQueue;
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
        long currentMileSecValue = getCurrentMillisecondsTime();
        for (ListenableFutureTask futureTask : futureQueue)
        {
            consumeFuture(futureTask, currentMileSecValue);
        }
    }

    private void consumeFuture(ListenableFutureTask futureTask, long currentMileSecValue)
    {
        ListenableFuture<Void> future = futureTask.getFuture();
        boolean isTimeout = futureTask.getMilliSecEndTime() >= currentMileSecValue;
        if (isTimeout)
        {
            if (!future.isDone())
            {
                future.cancel(true);
            }
            futureQueue.remove(futureTask);
        }
    }
}

class OwnTask implements Callable<Void>
{
    private long     timeoutDuration;
    private TimeUnit timeUnit;

    OwnTask(long timeoutDuration, TimeUnit timeUnit)
    {
        this.timeoutDuration = timeoutDuration;
        this.timeUnit = timeUnit;
    }

    @Override
    public Void call() throws Exception
    {
        // do logic
        return null;
    }

    public long getTimeoutDuration()
    {
        return timeoutDuration;
    }

    public TimeUnit getTimeUnit()
    {
        return timeUnit;
    }
}
}
0

check if this works for you,

    public <T,S,K,V> ResponseObject<Collection<ResponseObject<T>>> runOnScheduler(ThreadPoolExecutor threadPoolExecutor,
      int parallelismLevel, TimeUnit timeUnit, int timeToCompleteEachTask, Collection<S> collection,
      Map<K,V> context, Task<T,S,K,V> someTask){
    if(threadPoolExecutor==null){
      return ResponseObject.<Collection<ResponseObject<T>>>builder().errorCode("500").errorMessage("threadPoolExecutor can not be null").build();
    }
    if(someTask==null){
      return ResponseObject.<Collection<ResponseObject<T>>>builder().errorCode("500").errorMessage("Task can not be null").build();
    }
    if(CollectionUtils.isEmpty(collection)){
      return ResponseObject.<Collection<ResponseObject<T>>>builder().errorCode("500").errorMessage("input collection can not be empty").build();
    }

    LinkedBlockingQueue<Callable<T>> callableLinkedBlockingQueue = new LinkedBlockingQueue<>(collection.size());
    collection.forEach(value -> {
      callableLinkedBlockingQueue.offer(()->someTask.perform(value,context)); //pass some values in callable. which can be anything.
    });
    LinkedBlockingQueue<Future<T>> futures = new LinkedBlockingQueue<>();

    int count = 0;

    while(count<parallelismLevel && count < callableLinkedBlockingQueue.size()){
      Future<T> f = threadPoolExecutor.submit(callableLinkedBlockingQueue.poll());
      futures.offer(f);
      count++;
    }

    Collection<ResponseObject<T>> responseCollection = new ArrayList<>();

    while(futures.size()>0){
      Future<T> future = futures.poll();
      ResponseObject<T> responseObject = null;
        try {
          T response = future.get(timeToCompleteEachTask, timeUnit);
          responseObject = ResponseObject.<T>builder().data(response).build();
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
          future.cancel(true);
        } catch (ExecutionException e) {
          future.cancel(true);
        } catch (TimeoutException e) {
          future.cancel(true);
        } finally {
          if (Objects.nonNull(responseObject)) {
            responseCollection.add(responseObject);
          }
          futures.remove(future);//remove this
          Callable<T> callable = getRemainingCallables(callableLinkedBlockingQueue);
          if(null!=callable){
            Future<T> f = threadPoolExecutor.submit(callable);
            futures.add(f);
          }
        }

    }
    return ResponseObject.<Collection<ResponseObject<T>>>builder().data(responseCollection).build();
  }

  private <T> Callable<T> getRemainingCallables(LinkedBlockingQueue<Callable<T>> callableLinkedBlockingQueue){
    if(callableLinkedBlockingQueue.size()>0){
      return callableLinkedBlockingQueue.poll();
    }
    return null;
  }

you can restrict the no of thread uses from scheduler as well as put timeout on the task.

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