18

I want to write this structure:

struct A {
    b: B,
    c: C,
}

struct B {
    c: &C,
}

struct C;

The B.c should be borrowed from A.c.

A ->
  b: B ->
    c: &C -- borrow from --+
                           |
  c: C  <------------------+

This is what I tried: struct C;

struct B<'b> {
    c: &'b C,
}

struct A<'a> {
    b: B<'a>,
    c: C,
}

impl<'a> A<'a> {
    fn new<'b>() -> A<'b> {
        let c = C;
        A {
            c: c,
            b: B { c: &c },
        }
    }
}

fn main() {}

But it fails:

error[E0597]: `c` does not live long enough
  --> src/main.rs:17:24
   |
17 |             b: B { c: &c },
   |                        ^ borrowed value does not live long enough
18 |         }
19 |     }
   |     - borrowed value only lives until here
   |
note: borrowed value must be valid for the lifetime 'b as defined on the method body at 13:5...
  --> src/main.rs:13:5
   |
13 |     fn new<'b>() -> A<'b> {
   |     ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

error[E0382]: use of moved value: `c`
  --> src/main.rs:17:24
   |
16 |             c: c,
   |                - value moved here
17 |             b: B { c: &c },
   |                        ^ value used here after move
   |
   = note: move occurs because `c` has type `C`, which does not implement the `Copy` trait

I've read the Rust documentation on ownership, but I still don't know how to fix it.

  • 3
    Sibling references (ie, referencing part of the same struct) is not possible in Rust. – Matthieu M. Dec 21 '14 at 13:02
35

There is actually more than one reason why the code above fails. Let's break it down a little and explore a few options on how to fix it.

First let's remove the new and try building an instance of A directly in main, so that you see that the first part of the problem has nothing to do with lifetimes:

struct C;

struct B<'b> {
    c: &'b C,
}

struct A<'a> {
    b: B<'a>,
    c: C,
}

fn main() {
    // I copied your new directly here
    // and renamed c1 so we know what "c"
    // the errors refer to
    let c1 = C;

    let _ = A {
        c: c1,
        b: B { c: &c1 },
    };
}

this fails with:

error[E0382]: use of moved value: `c1`
  --> src/main.rs:20:20
   |
19 |         c: c1,
   |            -- value moved here
20 |         b: B { c: &c1 },
   |                    ^^ value used here after move
   |
   = note: move occurs because `c1` has type `C`, which does not implement the `Copy` trait

what it says is that if you assign c1 to c, you move its ownership to c (i.e. you can't access it any longer through c1, only through c). This means that all the references to c1 would be no longer valid. But you have a &c1 still in scope (in B), so the compiler can't let you compile this code.

The compiler hints at a possible solution in the error message when it says that type C is non-copyable. If you could make a copy of a C, your code would then be valid, because assigning c1 to c would create a new copy of the value instead of moving ownership of the original copy.

We can make C copyable by changing its definition like this:

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
struct C;

Now the code above works. Note that what @matthieu-m comments is still true: we can't store both the reference to a value and the value itself in B (we're storing a reference to a value and a COPY of the value here). That's not just for structs, though, it's how ownership works.

Now, if you don't want to (or can't) make C copyable, you can store references in both A and B instead.

struct C;

struct B<'b> {
    c: &'b C,
}

struct A<'a> {
    b: B<'a>,
    c: &'a C, // now this is a reference too
}

fn main() {
    let c1 = C;
    let _ = A {
        c: &c1,
        b: B { c: &c1 },
    };
}

All good then? Not really... we still want to move the creation of A back into a new method. And THAT's where we will run in trouble with lifetimes. Let's move the creation of A back into a method:

impl<'a> A<'a> {
    fn new() -> A<'a> {
        let c1 = C;
        A {
            c: &c1,
            b: B { c: &c1 },
        }
    }
}

as anticipated, here's our lifetime error:

error[E0597]: `c1` does not live long enough
  --> src/main.rs:17:17
   |
17 |             c: &c1,
   |                 ^^ borrowed value does not live long enough
...
20 |     }
   |     - borrowed value only lives until here
   |
note: borrowed value must be valid for the lifetime 'a as defined on the impl at 13:1...
  --> src/main.rs:13:1
   |
13 | impl<'a> A<'a> {
   | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

error[E0597]: `c1` does not live long enough
  --> src/main.rs:18:24
   |
18 |             b: B { c: &c1 },
   |                        ^^ borrowed value does not live long enough
19 |         }
20 |     }
   |     - borrowed value only lives until here
   |
note: borrowed value must be valid for the lifetime 'a as defined on the impl at 13:1...
  --> src/main.rs:13:1
   |
13 | impl<'a> A<'a> {
   | ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

this is because c1 is destroyed at the end of the new method, so we can't return a reference to it.

fn new() -> A<'a> {
    let c1 = C; // we create c1 here
    A {
        c: &c1,          // ...take a reference to it
        b: B { c: &c1 }, // ...and another
    }
} // and destroy c1 here (so we can't return A with a reference to c1)

One possible solution is to create C outside of new and pass it in as a parameter:

struct C;

struct B<'b> {
    c: &'b C,
}

struct A<'a> {
    b: B<'a>,
    c: &'a C
}

fn main() {
    let c1 = C;
    let _ = A::new(&c1);
}

impl<'a> A<'a> {
    fn new(c: &'a C) -> A<'a> {
        A {c: c, b: B{c: c}}
    }
}

playground

  • Do you (or anyone else) know if there's a way to make the compiler happy while still creating "C" inside of the new fn? – Sushisource Mar 13 '18 at 2:12
  • @Sushisource technically you could return references with a static lifetime (&'static C), but that's rarely useful in practice – Paolo Falabella Apr 13 '18 at 16:04
3

After checking with Manishearth and eddyb on the #rust IRC, I believe it's not possible for a struct to store a reference to itself or a portion of itself. So what you are trying to do isn't possible within Rust's type system.

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