4

My server runned for a time and about 200 connection created and did some calculations and closed, I found that it took up about 2,7G memory and never decreased after serveral days. The program itself didn't occupy that much , And I checked it by memstats. by cat /proc/11686/status | grep -i threads I got Threads: 177,so I think the reason that it took up so much memory is that it created to many threads .Why go create so much threads? Is it because I use too many go func()? And I'm sure goroutines didn't increase and they exited normally.

PS

There is so many code in my program, so I exclude the details, just keep the main

And my problem is when go create a thread to do something. and is it normal to have so many thread? I think it is not concerned much to the code.

main.go

package main

import (
    "sanguo/base/log"
    "fmt"
    "runtime"
    "math/rand"
    "time"
    "net"
    "os"
)

type GameServer struct {
    Host   string
}


func (server *GameServer) Start() {
    // load system data
    log.Debug("/*************************SREVER START********************************/")

    tcpAddr, err := net.ResolveTCPAddr("tcp4", server.Host)
    if err != nil {
        log.Error(err.Error())
        os.Exit(-1)
    }
    go func(){
        for{
            select {
            case <-time.After(30*time.Second):
                LookUp("read memstats")
            }
        }
    }()
    listener, err := net.ListenTCP("tcp", tcpAddr)
    if err != nil {
        log.Error(err.Error())
        os.Exit(-1)
    }
    log.Debug("/*************************SERVER SUCC********************************/")
    for {
        conn, err := listener.AcceptTCP()
        if err != nil {
            continue
        }
        log.Debug("Accept a new connection ", conn.RemoteAddr())
        go handleClient(conn)
    }
}

func handleClient(conn *net.TCPConn) {
    sess := NewSession(conn)
    sess.Start()
}

func main() {
    rand.Seed(time.Now().Unix())

    runtime.GOMAXPROCS(runtime.NumCPU())

    log.SetLevel(0)

    filew := log.NewFileWriter("log", true)
    err := filew.StartLogger()
    if err != nil {
        fmt.Println("Failed start log",err)
        return
    }

    var server GameServer
    server.Host = "127.0.0.1:9999"
    server.Start()
}

session.go

package main

import (
    "io"
    "encoding/binary"
    "encoding/json"
    "github.com/felixge/tcpkeepalive"
    "net"
    "sanguo/base/log"
    "strings"
    "sync"
    "time"
)


type Session struct {

    conn *net.TCPConn //the tcp connection from client

    recvChan      chan *bufferedManager.Token //data from client
    closeNotiChan chan bool   //

    ok   bool
    lock sync.Mutex

}


func NewSession(connection *net.TCPConn) (sess *Session) {
    var client Session

    client.conn = connection

    client.recvChan = make(chan []byte, 1024)
    client.closeNotiChan = make(chan bool)
    client.ok = true

    log.Debug("New Connection", &client)

    kaConn, err := tcpkeepalive.EnableKeepAlive(connection)
    if err != nil {
        log.Debug("EnableKeepAlive err ", err)
    } else {
        kaConn.SetKeepAliveIdle(120 * time.Second)
        kaConn.SetKeepAliveCount(4)
        kaConn.SetKeepAliveInterval(5 * time.Second)
    }
    return &client
}


func (sess *Session) Close() {
    sess.lock.Lock()
    if sess.ok {
        sess.ok = false
        close(sess.closeNotiChan)
        sess.conn.Close()
        log.Trace("Sess Close Succ", sess, sess.uid)
    }
    sess.lock.Unlock()
}

func (sess *Session) handleRecv() {
    defer func(){
        if err := recover(); err != nil {
            log.Critical("Panic", err)
        }
        log.Trace("Session Recv Exit", sess, sess.uid)
        sess.Close()
    }()
    ch := sess.recvChan
    header := make([]byte, 2)
    for {
        /**block until recieve len(header)**/
        n, err := io.ReadFull(sess.conn, header)
        if n == 0 && err == io.EOF {
            //Opposite socket is closed
            log.Warn("Socket Read EOF And Close", sess)
            break
        } else if err != nil {
            //Sth wrong with this socket
            log.Warn("Socket Wrong:", err)
            break
        }
        size := binary.LittleEndian.Uint16(header) + 4
        data := make([]byte, size)
        n, err = io.ReadFull(sess.conn, t.Data)
        if n == 0 && err == io.EOF {
            log.Warn("Socket Read EOF And Close", sess)
            break
        } else if err != nil {
            log.Warn("Socket Wrong:", err)
            break
        }
        ch <- data //send data to Client to process
    }
}

func (sess *Session) handleDispatch() {
    defer func(){
        log.Trace("Session Dispatch Exit",  sess, sess.uid)
        sess.Close()
    }()
    for {
        select {
        case msg, _ := <-sess.recvChan:
            log.Debug("msg", msg)
            sess.SendDirectly("helloworldhellowor", 1)

        case <-sess.closeNotiChan:
                return
        }
    }
}

func (sess *Session) Start() {
    defer func() {
        if err := recover(); err != nil {
            log.Critical("Panic", err)
        }
    }()
    go sess.handleRecv()

    sess.handleDispatch()

    close(sess.recvChan)
    log.Warn("Session Start Exit", sess, sess.uid)
}


func (sess *Session) SendDirectly(back interface{}, op int) bool {
    back_json, err := json.Marshal(back)
    if err != nil {
        log.Error("Can't encode json message ", err, back)
        return false
    }
    log.Debug(sess.uid, "OUT cmd:", op, string(back_json))
    _, err = sess.conn.Write(back_json)
    if err != nil {
        log.Error("send fail", err)
        return false
    }
    return true
}
3
  • You will need to show us some code. At best we can only guess what the cause may be - and that wouldn't make for very good material on a Q&A website. Dec 22, 2014 at 10:38
  • @buzz: you have yet to accept any answers. If no one is able to satisfactorily answer your questions, perhaps you should work on improving them.
    – JimB
    Dec 22, 2014 at 14:19
  • If you print a stack trace, you can see where all goroutines are waiting, which will help extrapolate which ones might be consuming entire threads.
    – JimB
    Dec 22, 2014 at 14:29

1 Answer 1

7

With Go, you can create many goroutines, it should not increase the number of threads. In your code, the number of threads running Go code is capped by runtime.NumCPU().

A thread may be created when the goroutine has to perform a blocking call, such as a system call, or a call to a C library via cgo. In that case, the runtime scheduler removes the thread running the goroutine from its scheduling pool. If the scheduling pool has less threads than GOMAXPROCS, then a new one will be created.

You can find a bit more information about how it works here: https://softwareengineering.stackexchange.com/questions/222642/are-go-langs-goroutine-pools-just-green-threads/222694#222694

To understand why your code generates threads, you have to investigate all the code paths resulting in blocking system calls or C calls. Note that network related calls are non-blocking, since they are automatically multiplexed by the standard library. However, if you perform some disks I/Os, or call foreign libraries, this will generate threads.

For instance, the logging library used in your code may perform some blocking I/Os resulting in threads being created (especially if the generated files are hosted on a slow device).

4
  • Thank you very much , that's just what I want to know. I'll check my code. I use github.com/garyburd/redigo/redis this library.
    – frank.lin
    Dec 23, 2014 at 2:10
  • I doubt redigo can generate blocking calls, except if you constantly connect and disconnect to Redis. AFAIK, the address resolution mechanism used in the Go standard library is still based on cgo. Dec 23, 2014 at 8:19
  • @DidierSpezia Note that network related calls are non-blocking, since they are automatically multiplexed by the standard library. However, if you perform some disks I/Os, or call foreign libraries, this will generate threads. Does this mean some sys calls blocking while some sys calls not blocking? Any detail I could reference? I mean something like time.sleep not blocking, io operation blocking, etc? I ask questions here: stackoverflow.com/questions/27600587/…, but still not quite understand the whole story, would you help? Thanks.
    – atline
    Jun 23, 2020 at 8:00
  • It might be platform dependent, and I have not seen a comprehensive list of the operations transformed in non blocking calls by the runtime. As a rule of thumb anything linked to communication is processed as non blocking (socket, pipes, etc ...) plus Go managed synchronization primitives and timers. Anything else is blocking and will lead to threads creation. Jun 27, 2020 at 19:16

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