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I'm building a command line utility in Elixir and packaging it as an escript. I need to run some clean-up tasks when the executable exits.

My understanding of an escript is that it starts the Application each time it receives input from stdIn. Am I correct that the Application should exit once it has completed processing the input?

My app does link a supervisor that monitors a GenServer, but from what I can tell it restarts every time the app receives new input from stdIn.

According to the Application Module Docs you can implement the stop/1 callback in your Application module. I am doing this but the callback never fires.

How can I execute clean-up tasks in an escript app?

  • This may have some bearing on your question: erlang.org/pipermail/erlang-bugs/2014-June/004450.html – Onorio Catenacci Dec 22 '14 at 19:47
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    The OTP application is started when you start the escript, and is running for as long as the script (OS process) is running, and that is until the main function returns. Once the main function is done, the OS process simply stops. Can't you simply clean up at the end of the main function? – sasajuric Dec 22 '14 at 22:45
  • Thank you for the responses. As you suggested sasajuric, doing the clean up at the end of the main function works. However I found it was necessary to add a :timer.sleep call to ensure my (async) clean-up tasks completed before the main function returned. – b73 Dec 23 '14 at 12:17
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    Why not make clean-up tasks sync? Then you wouldn't need to sleep. – sasajuric Dec 23 '14 at 21:11
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    Try calling Application.stop/1 manually to cleanup the app. This call is synchronous and returns after the entire supervision tree is terminated. Keep in mind that the default shutdown strategy is to wait for max 5 seconds for a process to gracefully terminate, so if you expect a longer cleanup in some processes, you need to revisit child specs used in your supervisor(s). – sasajuric Dec 24 '14 at 12:54
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The OTP application is started when you start the escript, and is running for as long as the script (OS process) is running, and that is until the main function returns. Once the main function is done, the OS process simply stops.

To explicitly cleanup the application, you can call Application.stop/1 at the end of the main function. This call is synchronous and returns after the entire supervision tree is terminated. Keep in mind that the default shutdown strategy is to wait for max 5 seconds for a process to gracefully terminate, so if you expect a longer cleanup in some processes, you need to revisit child specs used in your supervisor(s).

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