80

I have ten or so servers that I connect to with SSH on a regular basis. Each has an entry in my local computer's ~/.ssh/config file.

To avoid losing control of my running process when my Internet connection inevitably drops, I always work inside a tmux session. I would like a way to have tmux automatically connect every time an SSH connection is started, so I don't have to always type tmux attach || tmux new after I SSH in.

Unfortunately this isn't turning out to be as simple as I originally hoped.

  • I don't want to add any commands to the ~/.bashrc on the servers because I only want it for SSH sessions, not local sessions.
  • Adding tmux attach || tmux new to the ~/.ssh/rc on the servers simply results in the error not a terminal being thrown after connection, even when the RequestTTY force option is added to the line for that server in my local SSH config file.
  • 1
    As this continues to be a popular question and specifically mentions ~/.ssh/config: most of you coming here are probably not looking for any of the first five answers, but for the sixth (stackoverflow.com/a/52838493/5354137). With any reasonably recent tmux version that's also the most sensible way of doing things. – Sixtyfive Apr 25 at 17:19
84

Server-side configuration:

To automatically start tmux on your remote server when ordinarily logging in via SSH (and only SSH), edit the ~/.bashrc of your user or root (or both) on the remote server accordingly:

if [[ -n "$PS1" ]] && [[ -z "$TMUX" ]] && [[ -n "$SSH_CONNECTION" ]]; then
  tmux attach-session -t ssh_tmux || tmux new-session -s ssh_tmux
fi

This command creates a tmux session called ssh_tmux if none exists, or reattaches to a already existing session with that name. In case your connection dropped or when you forgot a session weeks ago, every SSH login automatically brings you back to the tmux-ssh session you left behind.

Connect from your client:

Nothing special, just ssh user@hostname.

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  • 4
    I was looking for this, also I used a piece of code very similiar to yours some time ago, but the session was the username (changing ssh_tmux to $USER) – Iacchus Dec 29 '16 at 18:31
  • 3
    See moneytoo’s answer for useful comment on $SSH_TTY vs $SSH_CONNECTION too. – Mr. Tao Apr 2 '18 at 9:41
  • 2
    you can use tmux new-session -A -s ssh_tmux to replace tmux attach-session -t ssh_tmux || tmux new-session -s ssh_tmux much shorter, if a bit more confusing, -A tells tmux to attach the session if it already exists – Gradient Dec 11 '18 at 9:28
  • 3
    To avoid breaking "scp", you'd also need to check if this is an interactive shell: if [[ -n "$PS1" ]] && [[ -z "$TMUX" ]] && [[ -n "$SSH_CONNECTION" ]]; – janfrode Dec 28 '18 at 12:46
  • 2
    @janfrode don't rely on $PS1, use [[ $- == *i* ]] instead, as PS1 may be defined even when it's not an interactive shell. – Enrico Aug 12 '19 at 1:57
49

Alright, I found a mostly satisfactory solution. In my local ~/.bashrc, I wrote a function:

function ssh () {/usr/bin/ssh -t $@ "tmux attach || tmux new";}

which basically overwrites the ssh terminal function to call the built-in ssh program with the given arguments, followed by "tmux attach || tmux new".

(The $@ denotes all arguments provided on the command line, so ssh -p 123 user@hostname will be expanded to ssh -t -p 123 user@hostname "tmux attach || tmux new")

(The -t argument is equivalent to RequestTTY Force and is necessary for the tmux command.)

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  • 22
    If your version of tmux supports it, consider using tmux new -A foo which will attach to an existing session named foo if possible, creating it if necessary. This lets you simplify your function to /usr/bin/ssh -t "$@" tmux new -A (and be sure to quote $@!). – chepner Dec 27 '14 at 0:40
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    Note: if some of the machines you connect to regularly don't have tmux installed, you might want to say function ssht or the like so that you can continue to use ssh normally. Otherwise, just type /usr/bin/ssh at the command prompt whenever connecting to a machine without tmux :) – Alex Ryan Jun 25 '15 at 4:51
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    If you are lazy, you can just use ssht to connect to you remote tmux sessions. OS X users can tap it via brew and Linux users can create a package via fpm with this Makefile or simply copy ssht to ~/bin. – brejoc Feb 8 '16 at 20:01
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    Haha nice! Seems like a bit of overkill to me to wrap this bash one-liner in a whole Github repo with Makefiles and brew and such but hey, the easier the better! – Alex Ryan Feb 9 '16 at 0:12
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    Solved: ssh -t user@hostname "LANG=$LANG tmux attach || tmux new" – alecdwm Aug 16 '16 at 23:24
18

Connect:

ssh user@host -t "tmux new-session -s user || tmux attach-session -t user"

During session:

Use Ctrl+d to finish session (tmux window closes) or Ctrl+b d to temporary detach from session and connect to it again later.

Remember! If your server restarted session lost!

When you are inside tmux anytime you can use Ctrl+b s to see sessions list and switch current to another.

Fix your .bashrc:

I recommend you to define universal function in your .bashrc:

function tmux-connect {
    TERM=xterm-256color ssh -p ${3:-22} $1@$2 -t "tmux new-session -s $1 || tmux attach-session -t $1"
}

It uses 22 port by default. Define your fast-connect aliases too:

alias office-server='tmux-connect $USER 192.168.1.123'
alias cloud-server='tmux-connect root my.remote.vps.server.com 49281'

Login without password:

And if you don't want to type password everytime than generate .ssh keys to login automatically:

ssh-keygen -t rsa
eval "$(ssh-agent -s)" && ssh-add ~/.ssh/id_rsa

Put your public key to the remote host:

ssh-copy-id -p <port> user@hostname

Additional tips:

If you want to use temporary session-id which corresponds with a local bash session use as tmux id:

SID=$USER-$BASHPID
ssh user@host -t "tmux new-session -s $SID || tmux attach-session -t $SID"
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  • 1
    A neat trick to avoid that || in some use-cases is to include new-session in .tmux.conf and just always use tmux a -t 0. – Florian Wendelborn Dec 19 '15 at 12:04
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    In newer versions of tmux you can also use tmux new-session -A which will attach if it exists otherwise it will create a new one. – dragon788 Oct 2 '17 at 15:45
15

I used lines from @kingmeffisto (I'm not allowed to comment that answer) and I added an exit so terminating tmux also terminates the ssh connection. This however broke SFTP sessions so I had to check for $SSH_TTY instead of $SSH_CONNECTION.

EDIT 4/2018: Added test for interactive terminal via [[ $- =~ i ]] to allow tools like Ansible to work.

if [ -z "$TMUX" ] && [ -n "$SSH_TTY" ] && [[ $- =~ i ]]; then
    tmux attach-session -t ssh || tmux new-session -s ssh
    exit
fi
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13

As described in this blog post you can ssh and then attach to an existing tmux session with a single command:

ssh hostname -t tmux attach -t 0
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  • That's what my answer does (although I use tmux attach || tmux new so that a new tmux session isn't created for every connection). The tricky part is that the correct command is ssh -t user@host tmux attach || tmux new and the only way to alias something that needs an argument inside the command string is to create a new function, like I did above. – Alex Ryan Apr 12 '15 at 19:47
  • I know, but some people (like me) might prefer a one-liner that doesn't involve defining a function – Fabian Pedregosa Apr 13 '15 at 9:36
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    This connects to a session called '0'. That is, the general form is ssh [hostname] -t tmux attach -t [sessionName] – David Doria Aug 26 '16 at 12:17
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    This worked really well for me.. Combined this will unix.stackexchange.com/a/116674.. so now my putty GUI looks like this.. imgur.com/uFhxN30. I can disconnect the sessions with Cntrl + b + d. Very simple and convenient.. – alpha_989 Aug 3 '17 at 12:19
9

tmux 3.1 or newer¹ on the remote machine

Into your local ~/.ssh/config, put²:

Host myhost
  Hostname host
  User user
  RequestTTY yes
  RemoteCommand tmux new -A -s foobar

Unrelated, but if you're dealing with non-ASCII characters, I'd recommend to change that into tmux -u … for explicitly enabling Unicode support even on machines that don't have the proper environment variables set.

tmux 3.0a or older on the remote machine

Almost the same as above, but change the last line to³:

  RemoteCommand tmux at -t foobar || tmux new -s foobar

¹ At the moment (2020-04-25), this includes: Alpine Linux (via the Edge repository), Arch, CRUX 3.5, Gentoo, Homebrew, Linuxbrew, MacPorts, Manjaro (Unstable only), Parabola, Slackware (current). Distros that seem to have backported the -A option are all that are based on Debian Buster or Devuan ASCII and I know it to be working with Alpine Linux 3.11 as well.

² new is short for new-session.

³ at is short for attach-session.


Alternative method using the remote's authorized_keys file:

If you would rather not have an ~/.ssh/config file for whatever reason, or want the remote machine to force the connecting machine to connect to / open the session, add this to your remote ~/.ssh/authorized_keys:

command="tmux at -t foobar || tmux new -s foobar" pubkey user@client

This will, of course, work from all clients having the corresponding private key installed, which could either be an up- or downside, depending on what you want. There is the risk that, should something go wrong, it might not be possible to connect anymore.

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  • why tmux at instead of tmux a? Also it would be wise to use a named session for this or tmux would attach to "random" existing sessions upon loging into the host. – Eric Feb 26 '19 at 8:48
  • How do you suspend the tmux session? ssh goes into kindda limbo state after hitting Ctrl+A Ctrl+Z. – Eric Feb 26 '19 at 9:03
  • It just disconnects. As far as I'm concerned, that's the behaviour I would expect and am happy with. – Sixtyfive Feb 27 '19 at 11:13
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    Ctrl-B D works treat compared to Ctrl-B Ctrl-Z. Thanks! – Eric Mar 2 '19 at 11:12
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    This should be, imho, the most voted answer. I was looking exactly for (2). – cduguet Mar 21 '19 at 12:12
1

byobu is a nice useful wrapper for tmux/screen. Connects to an existing session if present or creates a new one.

I use it with autossh which gracefully reconnects the ssh session. Highly recommended in case of intermittent connectivity issues.

function ssh-tmux(){
  if ! command -v autossh &> /dev/null; then echo "Install autossh"; fi
  autossh -M 0 $* -t 'byobu || {echo "Install byobu-tmux on server..."} && bash'
}
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1

You might find this useful - uses ssh in a loop and reconnects to or connects to an existing tmux session so you have a nice easy reliable way to reconnect after a network outage

#!/bin/bash
#
# reconnect to or spawn a new tmux session on the remote host via ssh.
# If the network connection is lost, ssh will reconnect after a small
# delay.
#

SSH_HOSTNAME=$1
TMUX_NAME=$2
PORT=$3

if [[ "$PORT" != "" ]]
then
    PORT="-p $PORT"
fi

if [ "$TMUX_NAME" = "" ]
then
    SSH_UNIQUE_ID_FILE="/tmp/.ssh-UNIQUE_ID.$LOGNAME"

    if [ -f $SSH_UNIQUE_ID_FILE ]
    then
        TMUX_NAME=`cat $SSH_UNIQUE_ID_FILE`
        TMUX_NAME=`expr $TMUX_NAME + $RANDOM % 100`
    else
        TMUX_NAME=`expr $RANDOM % 1024`
    fi

    echo $TMUX_NAME > $SSH_UNIQUE_ID_FILE

    TMUX_NAME="id$TMUX_NAME"
fi

echo Connecting to tmux $TMUX_NAME on hostname $SSH_HOSTNAME

SLEEP=0
while true; do

    ssh $PORT -o TCPKeepAlive=no -o ServerAliveInterval=15 -Y -X -C -t -o BatchMode=yes $SSH_HOSTNAME "tmux attach-session -t $TMUX_NAME || tmux -2 -u new-session -s $TMUX_NAME"
    SLEEP=10
    if [ $SLEEP -gt 0 ]
    then
        echo Reconnecting to session $TMUX_NAME on hostname $SSH_HOSTNAME in $SLEEP seconds
        sleep $SLEEP
    fi
done
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0

I know I'm reviving an old thread but I've done some work on the bashrc solution and I think it has some use:

#attach to the next available tmux session that's not currently occupied
if [[ -z "$TMUX" ]] && [ "SSH_CONNECTION" != "" ];
then
    for i in `seq 0 10`; do #max of 10 sessions - don't want an infinite loop until we know this works
            SESH=`tmux list-clients -t "$USER-$i-tmux" 2>/dev/null` #send errors to /dev/null - if the session doesn't exist it will throw an error, but we don't care
            if [ -z "$SESH" ] #if there's no clients currently connected to this session
            then
                tmux attach-session -t "$USER-$i-tmux" || tmux new-session -s "$USER-$i-tmux" #attach to it
                break #found one and using it, don't keep looping (this will actually run after tmux exits AFAICT)
            fi #otherwise, increment session counter and keep going
    done

fi

There's a cap at 10 (11) sessions for now - I didn't want to kill my server with an infinite loop in bashrc. It seems to work pretty reliably, other than the error of tmux failing on list-clients if the session doesn't exist.

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