45

I have following data and code to round selected columns of this data.table:

> dput(mydf)
structure(list(vnum1 = c(0.590165705411504, -1.39939534199836, 
0.720226053660755, -0.253198380120377, -0.783366825121657), vnum2 = c(0.706508400384337, 
0.526770398486406, 0.863136084517464, 0.838245498016477, 0.556775856064633
), vch1 = structure(c(2L, 4L, 1L, 3L, 3L), .Label = c("A", "B", 
"C", "E"), class = "factor")), .Names = c("vnum1", "vnum2", "vch1"
), row.names = c(NA, -5L), class = c("data.table", "data.frame"
))

> mydf[,round(.SD,1),]
Error in Math.data.frame(list(vnum1 = c(0.590165705411504, -1.39939534199836,  : 
  non-numeric variable in data frame: vch1

> cbind(mydf[,3,with=F], mydf[,1:2,with=F][,round(.SD,1),])
   vch1 vnum1 vnum2
1:    B   0.6   0.7
2:    E  -1.4   0.5
3:    A   0.7   0.9
4:    C  -0.3   0.8
5:    C  -0.8   0.6

Is there a better method (shorter code)? Thanks for your help.

4
  • 2
    mydf[,round(.SD,1),.SDcols=c("vnum1","vnum2")] or mydf[,round(.SD,1),.SDcols=1:2] ? – thelatemail Dec 23 '14 at 2:43
  • @thelatemail : My real data table has many columns and I will have to enter all their names. – rnso Dec 23 '14 at 2:44
  • 1
    @rnso - the indexes work too, see edit to the comment. – thelatemail Dec 23 '14 at 2:45
  • If you only need this rounding so that it's printed nicely, you can invest a different strategy, where you define a new print class and the assign it to the specified columns. This would have the advantage of keeping all the details (decimal places) of the numbers in the data. See here for a similar approach. – talat Dec 23 '14 at 6:51
29

If you don't mind overwriting your original mydf:

cols <- names(mydf)[1:2]
mydf[,(cols) := round(.SD,1), .SDcols=cols]
mydf

#   vnum1 vnum2 vch1
#1:   0.6   0.7    B
#2:  -1.4   0.5    E
#3:   0.7   0.9    A
#4:  -0.3   0.8    C
#5:  -0.8   0.6    C
4
  • 1
    This does not work when I apply it to numerical columns of other data sets using the same variable names, I get Error... unused argument (.SDcols = cols). Can you give an explanation of how these functions are working? – user5359531 Jul 13 '16 at 0:22
  • 1
    @user5359531 - are you using a data.table and not a standard data.frame? This code uses data.table specific functions, which you may not have loaded. – thelatemail Jul 13 '16 at 0:30
  • I think that explains it, thanks. Didn't see that when reading the original code. – user5359531 Jul 13 '16 at 0:36
  • 2
    Can be shortened to: mydf[,(cols) := round(.SD,1), .SDcols=1:2] – sindri_baldur Jun 25 '19 at 12:50
75

Using dplyr

If you want to round multiple columns at once:

mydf %>% mutate_at(vars(vnum1, vnum2), funs(round(., 1)))

Or, if you want to change all columns except "vch1":

mydf %>% mutate_at(vars(-vch1), funs(round(., 1)))

Or, if you want to change all columns starting with "vnum":

mydf %>% mutate_at(vars(starts_with("vnum")), funs(round(., 1)))

Or, if you want to change only numeric columns:

mydf %>% mutate_if(is.numeric, ~round(., 1))

You get:

  vnum1 vnum2 vch1
1   0.6   0.7    B
2  -1.4   0.5    E
3   0.7   0.9    A
4  -0.3   0.8    C
5  -0.8   0.6    C
2
  • 1
    Warning: funs() is soft deprecated as of dplyr 0.8.0 – PM0087 Jun 8 '20 at 17:22
  • @PeyM87 as_tibble(mydf) %>% mutate_at(vars(vnum1, vnum2), funs(round(., 1))) should work. – ENIAC-6 Aug 3 '20 at 17:43
30

dplyr works on data.table objects! dplyr::mutate (as of dplyr 1.0.0 major update) incorporates flexible specification of columns and functions for modifying the data, using across.

To specify all columns that have numeric data:

  • mydf %>% mutate(across(where(is.numeric), round, 1))
    • which is the same as mydf %>% mutate(across(where(is.numeric), ~round(., 1)))

To specify all columns with names that start with "vnum":

  • mydf %>% mutate(across(starts_with("vnum"), round, 1))

It is slightly more wordy than the previous mutate_if (which still works but is retired) but it is consistent with other possible specifications and allows for more variations.


Old answer

You can use mutate_if with the added benefit of rounding a column only if it is numeric

mydf %>% mutate_if(is.numeric, round, 1)

0
12

As of dplyr 0.8.0, funs() is soft deprecated. That means that list(name = ~f(.)) should be used instead of funs(name = f(.)):

mydf %>% 
 mutate_at(vars(vnum1, vnum2), list(~ round(., 1)))

  vnum1 vnum2 vch1
1   0.6   0.7    B
2  -1.4   0.5    E
3   0.7   0.9    A
4  -0.3   0.8    C
5  -0.8   0.6    C

Or written as a simple lambda function:

mydf %>% 
 mutate_at(vars(vnum1, vnum2), ~ round(., 1))

Then, from dplyr 1.0.0, across() inside mutate() should be used:

mydf %>% 
 mutate(across(c(vnum1, vnum2), ~ round(., 1)))

The use with select helpers, here selecting variables starting with "vnum":

mydf %>% 
 mutate(across(starts_with("vnum"), ~ round(., 1)))

Or selecting only numeric variables:

mydf %>% 
 mutate(across(where(~ is.numeric(.)), ~ round(., 1)))
9

require(data.table)

Short and clear solution:

mydf[, lapply(.SD, round, 1), vch1]

#   vch1 vnum1 vnum2
#1:    B   0.6   0.7
#2:    E  -1.4   0.5
#3:    A   0.7   0.9
#4:    C  -0.3   0.8
#5:    C  -0.8   0.6

Same, but with descriptive details:

mydf[, lapply(.SD, round, digits = 1), by = vch1]

If I have many columns, say: (vnum1, vnum2, vch1, vch2, vbin1, vbin2, vbin3) and I want to round only vnum1 and vnum2 ?

In this case you may use := operator and .SDcols = argument to specify columns to round:

mydf[, 1:2 := lapply(.SD, round, digits = 1), by = vch1]

In case you need to round certain columns and exclude other from the output you can use just .SDcols = argument to do both at once:

mydf[, lapply(.SD, round, digits = 1), by = vch1, .SDcols = "vnum1"]

.SDcols = can be supplied with column name or it's number,
as a single column by name .SDcols = "vnum1" or by number .SDcols = 1
as a multi columns by names .SDcols = c("vnum2", "vnum1") or by numbers .SDcols = c(2, 1)
as a columns range by names .SDcols = vnum1:vnum2 or by numbers.SDcols = 1:2

8
  • If I have many columns, say: (vnum1, vnum2, vch1, vch2, vbin1, vbin2, vbin3) and I want to round only vnum1 and vnum2 ? – rnso Feb 28 '17 at 1:51
  • Your solution (using .SDcols = c("vnum2", "vnum1") produces a data.table of only 3 columns: vch1, vnum2, vnum1. It does not produce entire data.table with only vnum1 and vnum2 rounded. – rnso Feb 28 '17 at 11:31
  • @rsno Just a second. I will update post with desired result in full compliance to your question. – Georgie Shimanovsky Feb 28 '17 at 11:41
  • @rsno Done. Hope this solution will be helpful. – Georgie Shimanovsky Feb 28 '17 at 12:03
  • 1
    I think you don't need "by", following also works: mydf[, 1:2 := lapply(.SD, round, digits = 1), .SDcols = 1:2] – rnso Feb 28 '17 at 12:50
1

Shortest by far:

mydf[, vch1, round(mydf[, 1:2], 1)]

#   vnum1 vnum2 vch1
#1:   0.6   0.7    B
#2:  -1.4   0.5    E
#3:   0.7   0.9    A
#4:  -0.3   0.8    C
#5:  -0.8   0.6    C

Interesting method. But what if I have many columns, say: (vnum1, vnum2, vch1, vch2, vbin1, vbin2, vbin3) and I want to round only vnum1 and vnum2 ? Also, some explanation regarding how it is working will be very useful

It's grouping by rounded columns using "by =" of data.table.

Here's is the example based on this method to solve your second level task.

Build-in dataset:

>dt <- data.table(names = rownames(datasets::ability.cov$cov), datasets::ability.cov$cov)
>dt
#     names general picture  blocks   maze reading   vocab
#1: general  24.641   5.991  33.520  6.023  20.755  29.701
#2: picture   5.991   6.700  18.137  1.782   4.936   7.204
#3:  blocks  33.520  18.137 149.831 19.424  31.430  50.753
#4:    maze   6.023   1.782  19.424 12.711   4.757   9.075
#5: reading  20.755   4.936  31.430  4.757  52.604  66.762
#6:   vocab  29.701   7.204  50.753  9.075  66.762 135.292

Short solution:

> dt_round <- dt[, .SD, by = round(dt[, blocks:maze], 1)]
> dt_round
#   blocks maze   names general picture reading   vocab
#1:   33.5  6.0 general  24.641   5.991  20.755  29.701
#2:   18.1  1.8 picture   5.991   6.700   4.936   7.204
#3:  149.8 19.4  blocks  33.520  18.137  31.430  50.753
#4:   19.4 12.7    maze   6.023   1.782   4.757   9.075
#5:   31.4  4.8 reading  20.755   4.936  52.604  66.762
#6:   50.8  9.1   vocab  29.701   7.204  66.762 135.292

Initial columns order:

> whatever <- setcolorder(dt_round, names(dt))
> whatever
#     names general picture blocks maze reading   vocab
#1: general  24.641   5.991   33.5  6.0  20.755  29.701
#2: picture   5.991   6.700   18.1  1.8   4.936   7.204
#3:  blocks  33.520  18.137  149.8 19.4  31.430  50.753
#4:    maze   6.023   1.782   19.4 12.7   4.757   9.075
#5: reading  20.755   4.936   31.4  4.8  52.604  66.762
#6:   vocab  29.701   7.204   50.8  9.1  66.762 135.292
2
  • Interesting method. But what if I have many columns, say: (vnum1, vnum2, vch1, vch2, vbin1, vbin2, vbin3) and I want to round only vnum1 and vnum2 ? Also, some explanation regarding how it is working will be very useful. – rnso Jan 26 '17 at 8:09
  • @rnso Well, you're right it's not typical approach to shorten the code for this particular task. It's grouping by rounded columns using "by =" of data.table. Thank you for your welcome. – Georgie Shimanovsky Jan 26 '17 at 23:34
1

If you want to be able to return a copy, you could use a function

The Function:

auto_round_dt<- function(dt, ndigits=3, return_copy=TRUE){
  dt<- data.table::setDT(dt)
  roundme<- names(sapply(dt, class))[which(sapply(dt, class) == "numeric")]
  if(return_copy == TRUE){
    tmp<- data.table::copy(dt)
    out<- tmp[, (roundme):=round(.SD, ndigits), .SDcols=roundme]
    return(out)
  } else{
    return(dt[, (roundme):=round(.SD, ndigits), .SDcols=roundme])
  }
}

Usage

To return a copy of the table without modifying the original:

newdt<- auto_round_dt(dt=mydt, ndigits = 3, return_copy = TRUE)

And to modify the object in place:

auto_round_dt(dt=mydt, ndigits = 3, return_copy = FALSE)

Note: You don't have to assign the result from auto_round_dt to a new data.table if you set return_copy= to FALSE.

0

I think from the solutions, the one by Steven Baupre using dplyr is the most elegant and applicable selectively across different columns in a dataframe, specially in computational physics.

library(dplyr)
gasCriticals %>%
  mutate_each(funs(round(., 0)), depth, pres, temp) %>%
  mutate_each(funs(round(., 2)), pres.pr, temp.pr, temp.r) %>%
  mutate_each(funs(round(., 1)), pres.pc, temp.pc)

As you can see, pressure and temperature will be rounded to 0 decimals; pseudo-reduced pressure and temperature to 2 decs; and finally, pseudo-critical pressure and temperature to 1 decimals.

1
  • 3
    It's nice to know that you are in favour of one of the suggested methods. But, this is not a proper answer to the question but a judgemental comment to an already existing dplyr answer. Please,consider to post this as a comment if you have gained enough reputation and delete this post. Thank you. – Uwe Mar 21 '17 at 23:10

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