11

This LINQ query expression fails with Win32Exception "Access is denied":

Process.GetProcesses().Select(p => p.MainModule.FileName)

And this fails with IOException "The device is not ready":

DriveInfo.GetDrives().Select(d => d.VolumeLabel)

What is the best way to filter out inaccessible objects and avoid exceptions?

13
+100

Write an extension method!

void Main()
{
    var volumeLabels = 
        DriveInfo
        .GetDrives()
        .SelectSafe(dr => dr.VolumeLabel);
}

// Define other methods and classes here

public static class LinqExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T2> SelectSafe<T,T2>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T,T2> selector)
    {
        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            T2 value = default(T2);
            try
            {           
                value = selector(item);
            }
            catch
            {
                continue;
            }
            yield return value;
        }
    }
}

This way you can customise any behaviour you want, and you don't have to create bulky and hacky where clauses, this way you could even get it to return an alternative value if there's an exception.

  • 1
    +1 I like it! It also look pretty generic, well done. (I'll wait a while to check other answers as well) – Cristi S. Jun 8 '17 at 16:48
  • I would suggest something like try { yield return selector(item); } catch { }, removing the need for value and continue. – NetMage Jun 14 '17 at 19:49
  • 1
    @NetMage you can't yield a value within a try block. – budi Jun 14 '17 at 20:04
  • Well, that's disappointing! – NetMage Jun 14 '17 at 21:22
  • 1
    @CristiS. the bounty is ending and this is an excellent answer! just sayin' haha – Robert Petz Jun 15 '17 at 14:50
10

Update based upon comments: This solution does not work with common enumerators. It does work based upon the enumerators used in the question's examples. Therefore it is not a generic solution. Because it has been written as a generic solution , I advise against using this (to keep things simple). I will keep this answer to enrich the knowledge base.

Another Extension method solution. Why do I prefer it over the existing solutions?

  • We want to skip elements causing exceptions only. This is the single concern of our LINQ extension.
  • This implementation does not mix the concern(s) of Select and try/catch.
  • We can still use existing LINQ methods like Select when needed.
  • It is reusable: it allows for multiple usages inside a LINQ query.
  • It follows linq naming conventions: We actually skip similar to Skip and SkipWhile methods.

Usage:

var result = DriveInfo
    .GetDrives()
    .Select(d => d.VolumeLabel)
    .SkipExceptions() // Our extension method
    .ToList();

Code:

public static class EnumerableExt
{
    // We use the `Skip` name because its implied behaviour equals the `Skip` and `SkipWhile` implementations
    public static IEnumerable<TSource> SkipExceptions<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
    {
        // We use the enumerator to be able to catch exceptions when enumerating the source
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            // We use a true loop with a break because enumerator.MoveNext can throw the Exception we need to handle
            while (true)
            {
                var exceptionCaught = false;
                var currentElement = default(TSource);
                try
                {
                    if (!enumerator.MoveNext())
                    {
                        // We've finished enumerating. Break to exit the while loop                            
                        break;
                    }

                    currentElement = enumerator.Current;
                }
                catch
                {
                    // Ignore this exception and skip this item.
                    exceptionCaught = true;
                }

                // Skip this item if we caught an exception. Otherwise return the current element.
                if (exceptionCaught) continue;

                yield return currentElement;
            }
        }
    }
}
  • 3
    I like this solution best, because it's implementation-agnostic and it makes smart use of LINQ's streaming paradigm. – Gert Arnold Jun 9 '17 at 12:32
  • 2
    +1 Brilliant indeed. This should be part of the .NET Framework! Your extension method filters out gracefully any inaccessible object within an enumerator. It's very generic and can be applied to any other enumerator. LINQ is just one possible application. – Cristi S. Jun 9 '17 at 16:59
  • 1
    I had the exact same idea, but discarded it. Mainly because in contrast with the concrete catch like in TrySelect from another answer, if unknown implementation of MoveNext throws exception, it's undefined what will happen when you call MoveNext the next time - it could continue throwing the same exception and cause infinite cycle. Or just return incorrect result. For instance, Enumerable.Range(1, 10).Select((x, i) => x / i).SkipExceptions().ToList(); will return 0 elements although only the first select will throw exception, so by idea it's supposed to return the rest 9 elements. – Ivan Stoev Jun 9 '17 at 20:42
  • 1
    @IvanStoev That is indeed a problem I have missed. Different behaviors from MoveNext implementations. Any ideas how we could handle this problem? Or maybe, just another generic solution to fix a specific problem is not the best way to go :) – Aphelion Jun 10 '17 at 7:06
  • 1
    @IvanStoev Thank you. I updated the answer with information about why not to use this, even though it is luckily a working solution for the example cases. – Aphelion Jun 10 '17 at 21:07
7

Your answer is the correct one. You can of course try to hide the checking logic inside an extension method.

public static IEnumerable<TElement> WhereSafe<TElement, TInner>(this IEnumerable<TElement> sequence, Func<TElement, TInner> selector)
{
    foreach (var element in sequence)
    {
        try { selector(element); }
        catch { continue; }
        yield return element;
    }
}


Process
    .GetProcesses()
    .WhereSafe(p => p.MainModule)
    .Select(p => p.MainModule.FileName)

Or better so:

public static IEnumerable<TInner> TrySelect<TElement, TInner>(this IEnumerable<TElement> sequence, Func<TElement, TInner> selector)
{
    TInner current = default(TInner);
    foreach (var element in sequence)
    {
        try { current = selector(element); }
        catch { continue; }
        yield return current;
    }
}


Process
   .GetProcesses()
   .TrySelect(p => p.MainModule.FileName)
  • I'm puzzled: I've seen Clint's answer before yours. Was this true? – Cristi S. Jun 8 '17 at 16:50
  • We must have written at the same time. I also was surprised to see his answer so similar to mine when I refreshed the page. Also, we both sticked to .NET's naming conventions and LINQ good practices, hence similarities. "Great minds think alike", kudos Clint ;) – ensisNoctis Jun 8 '17 at 16:57
  • Also, you can see I used booleans to flag correct elements, so that's some proof I worked alone. I edited to use continue keywords instead as Clint did, because it's simply better. The precedence is his. – ensisNoctis Jun 8 '17 at 16:59
  • I have no doubt you worked alone :), but we cannot split a bounty :) – Cristi S. Jun 8 '17 at 17:00
  • 1
    That's simple. Because TrySelect already does everything WhereSafe does PLUS it returns expected field already. After WhereSafe you end up having to Select the same thing a second time (imagine if selector was time-consuming). – ensisNoctis Jun 8 '17 at 17:05
5

Insert a WHERE filter (that tries to access any object and absorbs the possible access error) with:

   { try { var x = obj.MyProp; return true; } catch { return false; } }:

First expression:

Process
   .GetProcesses()
   .Where(p => { try { var x = p.MainModule; return true; } catch { return false; } })
   .Select(p => p.MainModule.FileName)

Second expression:

DriveInfo
   .GetDrives()
   .Where(d => { try { var x = d.VolumeLabel; return true; } catch { return false; } })
   .Select(d => d.VolumeLabel)
  • This seems more like you were giving a test... You Answered your own question in under 4 minutes. Should be a wiki – nckbrz Dec 23 '14 at 3:34
  • 1
    If this is indeed the right answer. I looked everywhere and came up with my own alternative but not sure it's the best. – Cristi S. Dec 23 '14 at 3:39
  • 1
    @nixxbb it is completely legit to answer your own questions. it is even recommended by SO to expand the knowledge base. – Aphelion Jun 9 '17 at 11:12
  • To keep it simple, as apparently there is no good generic solution, this seems to be the correct answer :) – Aphelion Jun 10 '17 at 21:10
2

I would try for the first scenario:

//Declare logger type
private readonly ILog _log = LogManager.GetLogger(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType);

Process.GetProcesses()
.Where(p => { 
    try {
        var x = p.MainModule;
        return true;
    }
    catch(Win32Exception e2)
    { IgnoreError(); } 
    })
.Select(p => p.MainModule.FileName)

public static void IgnoreError(Exception e) 
{
    #if DEBUG
    throw e2;
    //Save the error track, I prefer log4net
    _log.Info("Something bad happened!");
    #end if
}

And for the second scenario, I'd rather prefer to use an IF and save the log:

//Somewhere in the begging of your class, in a place whose name I do not care to remember ...
//Declare logger type
private readonly ILog _log = LogManager.GetLogger(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().DeclaringType);


public List<string> VolumenLabels()
{
    //Return the List<T>
    List<string> myVolumeLabels = new List<string>();
    //Getting the info
    DriveInfo[] allDrives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();

    foreach(DriveInfo drive in allDrives)
    {
        if (drive.IsReady == true)
        {
            myVolumeLabels.Add(drive.VolumeLabel.ToString());
        }
        else
        {
            _log.Info("Check the Drive: " + drive.Name + " the device is not ready.");
        }
    }    
    return myVolumeLabels;
}

I hope, I helped a little bit... Have a nice day!

  • 1
    Sorry, it didn't help at all. Why is this better than the answer? – Cristi S. Jun 8 '17 at 16:30
  • 1
    I don't think It's better, It's just another alternative, with a plus, It's saving the errors using Log4Net which It's pretty awesome to have a track record of the errors. – Pastor Cortes Jun 8 '17 at 16:42
  • 4
    adding code clutter is not a plus. – Cristi S. Jun 8 '17 at 16:52

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