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Let's say I have an array of doubles, is it safe to reinterpret_cast it to an array of structs each containing 4 doubles, with regards to alignment?

Consider this example code:

double *edges = ...; // Each edge is defined by 4 doubles in the array.

struct Edge { double vals[4]; };
Edge *asStruct = reinterpret_cast<Edge*>(edges);

std::sort(asStruct, asStruct + edgesCount, EdgeLengthComparator());

Is it guaranteed by the standard that sizeof(Edge) == sizeof(double)*4 always be true and if not, is it true in practice for Intel and ARM?

Edit: I found there is an __attribute__((__packed__)) for GCC, would that guarantee it for GCC at least and does MSVC have a similar option?

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    Instead of this low level non-portable hack, I prefer to copy all the data to a well-written C++ construct before doing any computation.
    – user2486888
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:56
  • 1
    @NickyC Performance, performance, performance :)
    – sashoalm
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:59
  • 2
    If I want performance, I prefer replacing the C style code with a well-written C++ construct in the first place.
    – user2486888
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 8:03
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    @doc: How would that help? Even ignoring the cost of creating your extra array of pointers, you won't end up sorting the array of doubles as required. Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 8:17
  • 1
    @sashoalm let iterator point to your own type. Define copy assignment for that type, so that it swaps 4 doubles.
    – mip
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 8:31

3 Answers 3

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Is it guaranteed by the standard?

Formally, no; in practice, yes. The closest to a guarantee is C++11 9.2/20:

A pointer to a standard-layout struct object, suitably converted using a reinterpret_cast, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides) and vice versa. [ Note: There might therefore be unnamed padding within a standard-layout struct object, but not at its beginning, as necessary to achieve appropriate alignment. — end note ]

So the cast will correctly reinterpret the first array elements as a single structure; but I don't think there's a formal guarantee that it won't expect extra padding between structures.

If not, is it true in practice for Intel, AMD, and ARM?

At least on mainstream architectures like the ones you list, there's no need to add padding for alignment in this case, and no other reason to do so; so in practice, this should work, but without guaranteed portability.

I found there is an __attribute__((__packed__)) for GCC, would that guarantee it for GCC at least?

Yes. According to the documentation, this "specifie[s] that the minimum required memory be used to represent the type", so it will prevent any padding being added after the array member.

Does MSVC have a similar option?

It has a compiler flag /Zp1 and a pragma #pragma pack(push, 1) (with #pragma pack(pop) to restore default alignment), but they don't seem to offer the guarantee you need; they control the alignment of "each structure member after the first is stored", with no mention of the overall structure size.

4

The C Standard does not guarantee this. In fact, it explicitly says (in 6.7.2.1):

There may be unnamed padding at the end of a structure or union

However, in practice, you can use implementation-specific features to force zero padding for the struct. If you do so, I recommend utilizing a static assertion technique to ensure sizeof(Edge) == sizeof(double)*4 when the code is being compiled.

Update (re C++):

A series of comments asked if I can verify this for C++. In the draft copy of C++11, page 220, it says the following (emphasis mine):

  1. A pointer to a standard-layout struct object, suitably converted using a reinterpret_cast, points to its initial member (or if that member is a bit-field, then to the unit in which it resides) and vice versa. [ Note: There might therefore be unnamed padding within a standard-layout struct object, but not at its beginning, as necessary to achieve appropriate alignment. — end note ]
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    (The question is tagged with C++.)
    – 2501
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:53
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    But does it refer to the C standard for this thing? Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:55
  • @juanchopanza I don't have a C++ standard handy. I do not suspect it would differ, but I will leave actually verifying it as an exercise for the reader. Please let me know if it says something different. Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:56
  • @MehrdadAfshari Thanks, I've been searching about the topic, there seems to be __attribute__(packed) for GCC at least.
    – sashoalm
    Commented Dec 23, 2014 at 7:57
1

It may work, or may not, or any kind of weird things may happen, as this invokes undefined behavior. You may want to have a look at https://stackoverflow.com/a/5398498/2144471 also, for info related to struct padding.

However, what you might do in that way is to refactor your code in order to leverage the following language feature (http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/reinterpret_cast)

the resulting pointer or reference may only be accessed if one of the following is true:
...
T2 is an aggregate type or a union type which holds one of the aforementioned types as an element or non-static member (including, recursively, elements of subaggregates and non-static data members of the contained unions): this makes it safe to cast from the first member of a struct and from an element of a union to the struct/union that contains it.

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