8

I have the following simple DynamoDBDao which contains one method that queries an index and returns a map of results.

import com.amazonaws.services.dynamodbv2.document.*;

public class DynamoDBDao implements Dao{
    private Table table;
    private Index regionIndex;

    public DynamoDBDao(Table table) {
        this.table = table;
    }

    @PostConstruct
    void initialize(){
        this.regionIndex = table.getIndex(GSI_REGION_INDEX);
    }

    @Override
    public Map<String, Long> read(String region) {
        ItemCollection<QueryOutcome> items = regionIndex.query(ATTR_REGION, region);
        Map<String, Long> results = new HashMap<>();
        for (Item item : items) {
            String key = item.getString(PRIMARY_KEY);
            long value = item.getLong(ATTR_VALUE);
            results.put(key, value);
        }
        return results;
    }
}

I am trying to write a unit test which verifies that when the DynamoDB index returns an ItemCollection then the Dao returns the corresponding results map.

public class DynamoDBDaoTest {

    private String key1 = "key1";
    private String key2 = "key2";
    private String key3 = "key3";
    private Long value1 = 1l;
    private Long value2 = 2l;
    private Long value3 = 3l;

    @InjectMocks
    private DynamoDBDao dynamoDBDao;

    @Mock
    private Table table;

    @Mock
    private Index regionIndex;

    @Mock
    ItemCollection<QueryOutcome> items;

    @Mock
    Iterator iterator;

    @Mock 
    private Item item1;

    @Mock
    private Item item2;

    @Mock
    private Item item3;

    @Before
    public void setUp() {
        MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
        when(table.getIndex(DaoDynamo.GSI_REGION_INDEX)).thenReturn(regionIndex);
        dynamoDBDao.initialize();

        when(item1.getString(anyString())).thenReturn(key1);
        when(item1.getLong(anyString())).thenReturn(value1);
        when(item2.getString(anyString())).thenReturn(key2);
        when(item2.getLong(anyString())).thenReturn(value2);
        when(item3.getString(anyString())).thenReturn(key3);
        when(item3.getLong(anyString())).thenReturn(value3);
    }

    @Test
    public void shouldReturnResultsMapWhenQueryReturnsItemCollection(){

        when(regionIndex.query(anyString(), anyString())).thenReturn(items);
        when(items.iterator()).thenReturn(iterator);
        when(iterator.hasNext())
                .thenReturn(true)
                .thenReturn(true)
                .thenReturn(true)
                .thenReturn(false);
        when(iterator.next())
                .thenReturn(item1)
                .thenReturn(item2)
                .thenReturn(item3);

        Map<String, Long> results = soaDynamoDbDao.readAll("region");

        assertThat(results.size(), is(3));
        assertThat(results.get(key1), is(value1));
        assertThat(results.get(key2), is(value2));
        assertThat(results.get(key3), is(value3));
    }
}

My problem is that items.iterator() does not actually return Iterator it returns an IteratorSupport which is a package private class in the DynamoDB document API. This means that I cannot actually mock it as I did above and so I cannot complete the rest of my test.

What can I do in this case? How do I unit test my DAO correctly given this awful package private class in the DynamoDB document API?

2
  • 2
    Implementation details like visibility are one of the reasons for the guideline "don't mock types you don't own". Can you write an abstraction across any of these objects with a contract/implementation you control, or code against an interface instead? Dec 23, 2014 at 17:05
  • Hi Jeff, thank you for your comment. I don't see how I can write an abstraction across these objects with a contract/implementation I control. I have exhausted my current toolset which is limited by my knowledge and experience. Can you see something that I currently cannot? If so then I would be grateful if you could point me in the right direction. Dec 23, 2014 at 17:41

7 Answers 7

6
+25

First, unit tests should never try to verify private state internal to an object. It can change. If the class does not expose its state via non-private getter methods, then it is none of your test's business how it is implemented.

Second, why do you care what implementation the iterator has? The class has fulfilled its contract by returning an iterator (an interface) which when iterated over will return the objects it is supposed to.

Third, why are you mocking objects that you don't need to? Construct the inputs and outputs for your mocked objects, don't mock them; it is unnecessary. You pass a Table into your constructor? Fine.
Then extend the Table class to make whatever protected methods for whatever you need. Add protected getters and/or setters to your Table subclass. Have them return hard coded values if necessary. They don't matter.

Remember, only test one class in your test class. You are testing the dao not the table nor the index.

5
  • 1
    Unfortunately, the service call to DynamoDB needs to be the mocked and the service call can only be accessed by polymorphic access to package protected classes, the types of which Java enforces at runtime. Instead of asking why, you should provide a solution.
    – Max
    Jul 16, 2015 at 21:07
  • Have you tried to mock the iterator returned by the implied call in your for loop? Override the ItemCollection to return an Iterable<Item> that behaves as you wish it to.
    – Rick Ryker
    Oct 1, 2015 at 19:53
  • That is not valid Java. Java will check the type at runtime. An arbitrary instance of Iterator is not a valid instance of IteratorSupprt so Java will throw a runtime exception. I filed an issue about this with AWS and the iterator is no longer package protected: github.com/aws/aws-sdk-java/issues/465
    – Max
    Oct 1, 2015 at 20:26
  • The for loop has a Item : ItemCollection<QueryOutcome>. Your mocked Table needs to provide a getIndex(?) method that satisfies the contract and returns a subclass of Index. That subclass needs to satisfy the contract of the query() method to return a subclass that extends ItemCollection<QueryOutcome>. The subclass needs to satisfy the iterator contract and provide a safe iterator that returns Item objects.
    – Rick Ryker
    Oct 13, 2015 at 18:26
  • You've misstated the ItemCollection contract. ItemCollection explicitly lists IteratorSupport as its iterator type. This means that any subclass of ItemCollection must return an iterator that is a subclass of IteratorSupport. So the iterator method in ItemCollection looks like this: public IteratorSupport<V> iterator().
    – Max
    Oct 14, 2015 at 7:44
1

Dynamodb api has a lot of such classes which can not easily be mocked. This results in lot of time spent on writing complex tests and changing features are big pain.

I think, for this case a better approach will be not try to go the traditional way and use DynamodbLocal library by the AWS team - http://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/Tools.DynamoDBLocal.html

This is basically an in memory implementation of DyanamoDB. We had written our tests such that during unit test initialization, DyanmodbLocal instance would be spawned and tables would be created. This makes the testing a breeze. We have not yet found any bugs in the library and it is actively supported and developed by AWS. Highly recommend it.

0

One possible workaround is to define a test class which extends IteratorSupport in the same package that it is present in, and define the desired behavior

You can then return an instance of this class through your mock setup in the test case.

Of course, this is not a good solution, but simply a workaround for the same reasons that @Jeff Bowman mentioned in the comment.

0

May be it'd be better to extract ItemCollection retrieval to the separate method? In your case it may look as follows:

public class DynamoDBDao {

  protected Iterable<Item> readItems(String region) { // can be overridden/mocked in unit tests
    // ItemCollection implements Iterable, since ItemCollection-specific methods are not used in the DAO we can return it as Iterable instance
    return regionIndex.query(ATTR_REGION, region);
  }
}

then in unit tests:

private List<Item> mockItems = new ArrayList<>(); // so you can set these items in your test method

private DynamoDBDao dao = new DynamoDBDao(table) {
  @Override
  protected Iterable<Item> readItems(String region) {
    return mockItems;
  }
}
0

When you use when(items.iterator()).thenReturn(iterator); Mockito sees the items as ItemCollection which causes the compilation error. In your test case, you want to see ItemCollection as just an Iterable. So, the simple solution is to cast the items as Iterable like below:

when(((Iterable<QueryOutcome>)items).iterator()).thenReturn(iterator);

Also make your iterator as

@Mock
Iterator<QueryOutcome> iterator;

This should fix the code without warning :)

If this fixes the problem, please accept the answer.

0

You can test your read method by using fake objects like this :

public class DynamoDBDaoTest {

@Mock
private Table table;

@Mock
private Index regionIndex;


@InjectMocks
private DynamoDBDao dynamoDBDao;

public DynamoDBDaoTest() {
}

@Before
public void setUp() {
    MockitoAnnotations.initMocks(this);
    when(table.getIndex(GSI_REGION_INDEX)).thenReturn(regionIndex);
    dynamoDBDao.initialize();
}

@Test
public void shouldReturnResultsMapWhenQueryReturnsItemCollection() {
    when(regionIndex.query(anyString(), anyString())).thenReturn(new FakeItemCollection());
    final Map<String, Long> results = dynamoDBDao.read("region");
    assertThat(results, allOf(hasEntry("key1", 1l), hasEntry("key2", 2l), hasEntry("key3", 3l)));
}

private static class FakeItemCollection extends ItemCollection<QueryOutcome> {
    @Override
    public Page<Item, QueryOutcome> firstPage() {
        return new FakePage();
    }
    @Override
    public Integer getMaxResultSize() {
        return null;
    }
}

private static class FakePage extends Page<Item, QueryOutcome> {
    private final static List<Item> items = new ArrayList<Item>();

    public FakePage() {
        super(items, new QueryOutcome(new QueryResult()));

        final Item item1= new Item();
        item1.with(PRIMARY_KEY, "key1");
        item1.withLong(ATTR_VALUE, 1l);
        items.add(item1);

        final Item item2 = new Item();
        item2.with(PRIMARY_KEY, "key2");
        item2.withLong(ATTR_VALUE, 2l);
        items.add(item2);

        final Item item3 = new Item();
        item3.with(PRIMARY_KEY, "key3");
        item3.withLong(ATTR_VALUE, 3l);
        items.add(item3);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean hasNextPage() {
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public Page<Item, QueryOutcome> nextPage() {
        return null;
    }
}
0
ItemCollection<QueryOutcome> items = new ItemCollection<QueryOutcome>() {
        @Override
        public Integer getMaxResultSize() {
            return 0;
        }

        @Override
        public Page<Item, QueryOutcome> firstPage() {
            return null;
        }
    };
    Mockito.when(index.query(Mockito.any(QuerySpec.class))).thenReturn(items);
    QueryResult queryResult = new QueryResult();
    Mockito.when(dynamoDBClient.query(Mockito.any(QueryRequest.class))).thenReturn(queryResult);
1
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