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I have recently joined a project and one of the main interface classes on the project has the initialization below.

class CCom_Itf
{
   CCom_Itf(IGlobalInterfaceTable *git_ptr): m_git_ptr(NULL), m_ComInitialized(false) 
   {
      m_git_ptr = git_ptr;
   }
...

Is there any advantage/disadvantage of initializing m_git_ptr as above, or I miss something?. Thanks.

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  • 2
    Advantage: none, unless there is some hidden dependency which requires this strange initialization. Disadvantages: you are wasting time thinking about something while you could be doing something else (unless there is some hidden dependency etc...) Dec 23, 2014 at 9:14

2 Answers 2

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The disadvantage is that it's being initialized twice, in two different ways. This is not a performance problem, as an optimizing compiler will eliminate the first assignment, but it is a problem for code readability. Pick one style and stick with it.

Note that in C++11 this sort of "double initialization" comes back into fashion, with in-class member initialization:

class CCom_Itf
{
    m_git_ptr = nullptr; // in-class init
...

In such a case, the in-class initializer will be ignored if the constructor has an initialization list with the same member. This sort of double-initialization seems less avoidable, however.

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There's no advantage to this strange initialisation-assignment dance, unless you're being paid per character of source code.

For a simple, non-constant member, the disadvantages are trivial: that you're writing more code than you need to, and relying on the compiler to notice that the dance can be replaced by a single initialisation (with a, probably tiny, performance impact if it doesn't).

For more complicated types, there could be a performance cost, as default-initialisation followed by assignment might be more work than direct initialisation. If the type isn't assignable, or the member is declared const, then the dance won't work at all.

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  • "being paid per character of source code" that's a nice feature!
    – Marson Mao
    Dec 23, 2014 at 9:29

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