22

I'm trying to count consecutive up days in equity return data - so if a positive day is 1 and a negative is 0, a list y=[0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1] should return z=[0,0,1,2,3,0,0,1,0,1,2].

I've come to a solution which is neat in terms of number of lines of code, but is very slow:

import pandas
y=pandas.Series([0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1])
def f(x):
    return reduce(lambda a,b:reduce((a+b)*b,x)
z=pandas.expanding_apply(y,f)

I'm guessing I'm looping through the whole list y too many times. Is there a nice Pythonic way of achieving what I want while only going through the data once? I could write a loop myself but wondering if there's a better way.

Thanks!

-4

why the obsession with the ultra-pythonic way of doing things? readability + efficiency trumps "leet hackerz style."

I'd just do it like so:

a = [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1]
b = [0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0]

for i in range(len(a)):
    if a[i] == 1:
        b[i] = b[i-1] + 1
    else:
        b[i] = 0
  • I guess the loop is still the best thing... Tx – alex314159 Dec 23 '14 at 21:21
  • 11
    Its slow though, why to use loop when we have the power of parallel calculation by numpy – Ankit Kumar Namdeo Dec 14 '16 at 12:33
  • 3
    This is a really bad answer. It is not readability + efficiency at all, as this is very inefficient; if you're optimizing readability, don't use Pandas (and use only tiny tiny datasets). – Ami Tavory Jun 12 '18 at 22:29
  • 1
    Categorically, Python iterations are slower than Pandas logic. And to be honest, this isn't that readable, and quite bulky. – S3DEV Sep 6 '19 at 7:42
91
>>> y = pandas.Series([0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1])

The following may seem a little magical, but actually uses some common idioms: since pandas doesn't yet have nice native support for a contiguous groupby, you often find yourself needing something like this.

>>> y * (y.groupby((y != y.shift()).cumsum()).cumcount() + 1)
0     0
1     0
2     1
3     2
4     3
5     0
6     0
7     1
8     0
9     1
10    2
dtype: int64

Some explanation: first, we compare y against a shifted version of itself to find when the contiguous groups begin:

>>> y != y.shift()
0      True
1     False
2      True
3     False
4     False
5      True
6     False
7      True
8      True
9      True
10    False
dtype: bool

Then (since False == 0 and True == 1) we can apply a cumulative sum to get a number for the groups:

>>> (y != y.shift()).cumsum()
0     1
1     1
2     2
3     2
4     2
5     3
6     3
7     4
8     5
9     6
10    6
dtype: int32

We can use groupby and cumcount to get us an integer counting up in each group:

>>> y.groupby((y != y.shift()).cumsum()).cumcount()
0     0
1     1
2     0
3     1
4     2
5     0
6     1
7     0
8     0
9     0
10    1
dtype: int64

Add one:

>>> y.groupby((y != y.shift()).cumsum()).cumcount() + 1
0     1
1     2
2     1
3     2
4     3
5     1
6     2
7     1
8     1
9     1
10    2
dtype: int64

And finally zero the values where we had zero to begin with:

>>> y * (y.groupby((y != y.shift()).cumsum()).cumcount() + 1)
0     0
1     0
2     1
3     2
4     3
5     0
6     0
7     1
8     0
9     1
10    2
dtype: int64
  • 2
    @CodingOrange: it's the usual tradeoff between multiple passes vs. fast operations. Python iteration is slow, so when using long Series, the more of it you can push down to native pandas ops, the better off you'll be. Conversely, if the Series is as small as it is in the example, you'll waste more time in overhead. Exactly the same issue comes up when writing vectorized numpy code. – DSM Dec 23 '14 at 19:40
  • Very magical! A bit too complicated for me but very interesting, tx – alex314159 Dec 23 '14 at 21:23
  • This really did the trick. If you're like me and have a column in a df you'd start with something like y = df.pctChange > 0 to get the boolean series. – fantabolous Oct 26 '16 at 13:11
  • 2
    Very clever. Thanks – Shaun Mar 22 '17 at 20:35
  • 1
    Love the explanation! – FaCoffee Jun 9 '17 at 9:06
5

If something is clear, it is "pythonic". Frankly, I cannot even make your original solution work. Also, if it does work, I am curious if it is faster than a loop. Did you compare?

Now, since we've started discussing efficiency, here are some insights.

Loops in Python are inherently slow, no matter what you do. Of course, if you are using pandas, you are also using numpy underneath, with all the performance advantages. Just don't destroy them by looping. This is not to mention that Python lists take a lot more memory than you may think; potentially much more than 8 bytes * length, as every integer may be wrapped into a separate object and placed into a separate area in memory, and pointed at by a pointer from the list.

Vectorization provided by numpy should be sufficient IF you can find some way to express this function without looping. In fact, I wonder if there some way to represent it by using expressions such as A+B*C. If you can construct this function out of functions in Lapack, then you can even potentially beat ordinary C++ code compiled with optimization.

You can also use one of the compiled approaches to speed-up your loops. See a solution with Numba on numpy arrays below. Another option is to use PyPy, though you probably can't properly combine it with pandas.

In [140]: import pandas as pd
In [141]: import numpy as np
In [143]: a=np.random.randint(2,size=1000000)

# Try the simple approach
In [147]: def simple(L):
              for i in range(len(L)):
                  if L[i]==1:
                      L[i] += L[i-1]


In [148]: %time simple(L)
CPU times: user 255 ms, sys: 20.8 ms, total: 275 ms
Wall time: 248 ms


# Just-In-Time compilation
In[149]: from numba import jit
@jit          
def faster(z):
    prev=0
    for i in range(len(z)):
        cur=z[i]
        if cur==0:
             prev=0
        else:
             prev=prev+cur
             z[i]=prev

In [151]: %time faster(a)
CPU times: user 51.9 ms, sys: 1.12 ms, total: 53 ms
Wall time: 51.9 ms


In [159]: list(L)==list(a)
Out[159]: True

In fact, most of the time in the second example above was spent on Just-In-Time compilation. Instead (remember to copy, as the function changes the array).

b=a.copy()
In [38]: %time faster(b)
CPU times: user 55.1 ms, sys: 1.56 ms, total: 56.7 ms
Wall time: 56.3 ms

In [39]: %time faster(c)
CPU times: user 10.8 ms, sys: 42 µs, total: 10.9 ms
Wall time: 10.9 ms

So for subsequent calls we have a 25x-speedup compared to the simple version. I suggest you read High Performance Python if you want to know more.

  • Didn't know about numba, seems interesting - tx! – alex314159 Dec 24 '14 at 19:13
1

Keeping things simple, using one array, one loop, and one conditional.

a = [0,0,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,1]

for i in range(1, len(a)):
    if a[i] == 1:
        a[i] += a[i - 1]
  • I guess the loop is still the best thing... This works (except it destroys the list but easy to fix) thx – alex314159 Dec 23 '14 at 21:22

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