7

I'm writing an internal unit tests framework which involves mocking multiple functions/classes.
@patch seems to be working great for my needs, but as there are many tests that will require to patch many different classes/functions, I'm looking to avoid writing multiple @patch before every test and maybe encapsulate them all into another decorator. To better illustrate my needs:

current state:

@patch('p.A', mockedA)
@patch('p.B', mockedB)
.
.
@patch('p.N', mockedN)
def test_this()

desired state:

@patch_all
def test_this()

Is it possible to implement something like this?, so far I wasn't able to as @patch requires to be followed either def or another @.

EDIT 2:
I've tried Michele's suggestion, but the test is no longer being identified as a test:
After adding functools.wraps to the patch_all decorator, it worked.

def patch_all(f):
@patch('p.A', moduleA.classA.methodA)
@patch('p.B', moduleB.classB.methodB)
.
.
@patch('p.N', moduleN.classN.methodN)
wraps(f)
def functor(*args, **kwargs):
    return f(*args, **kwargs)
return functor


class TestWrapper(unittest.TestCase):
    @patch_all
    def my_test(self):
        my test goes here...

With the @patch_all decorator this is what I get:

nosetests Tester.py --nocapture 

----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 0 tests in 0.000s

OK

If I remove it:

$ nosetests Tester.py --nocapture 
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 7.692s

OK

Thanks in advance.

6
  • Your test name must start bu test_ otherwise the runner doesn't recognize it Dec 28, 2014 at 9:24
  • Doesn't work either. Though, I believe if that was a must, it wouldn't have ran when I remove the decorator. Dec 28, 2014 at 9:26
  • 1
    Ok, it depend from the runner. I need some time to look at it. Maybe use @wrap decorator should fix it. But I cannot try it now, i'm using a phone. I'll can try it later in the day. Dec 28, 2014 at 9:32
  • You're right! i've added the functools.wraps and no it works. Dec 28, 2014 at 9:36
  • I'll fix my answer later Dec 28, 2014 at 9:38

1 Answer 1

8

patch decorator like all decorators is just a function that take a function and return a function ([EDIT] in the original version I forgot @functools.wraps(f) to make a correct test decorator, thanks to @MenyIssakov to let me know that my answer was wrong). You can define your own patch_all decorator like

def patch_all(f):
    @patch('p.A', argsA)
    @patch('p.B', argsB)
    .
    .
    @patch('p.N', argsN)
    @functools.wraps(f)
    def functor(*args, **kwargs):
        return f(*args, **kwargs)
    return functor

Now you can use @patch_all decorator in your tests like:

@patch_all
def test_all(mockN, ..., mockB, mockA):
    my beautiful test

You can go over this and define your own decorator that take a list of tuple to pass to the patch calls.

However i think that is not a good idea: test should be simple and mocking should be explicit to make clear the aim of the test. If you must patch a lot of objects/methods/functions in a lot of tests functions consider to apply the decorator to the class instead of the single methods to write it just one time for all test methods.

1
  • Hi Michele, I've tried your example which I did something similar before. my issue after using this method is that the test is no longer being identified as a unit test (I'm using nose). Once I remove the patch_all annotation and run the nosetests tests.py It attempts to run my test, if I put back the patch_all annotation, i get the message that it ran 0 tests. Dec 28, 2014 at 9:11

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