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how to add count of total number of lines for that same file in footer.

Ex:

prabhat
prabhat1
prabhat3
prabhat4
prabhat5235
total 5 records are there in this file.

as above total 5 rows are there so in last line it is showing it that "total 5 records are there in this file"

3

Using perl from command line, with -i, inline editing,

perl -i -pe '$_ .= "total $. records are there in this file\n" if eof' file
  • 3
    or perl -lpe 'END{print "total $. records are there in this file"}' file ... nice use of eof though! :) – jaypal singh Dec 24 '14 at 23:57
  • @jaypalsingh yes, that would be preferred if you don't edit file on the fly. – Сухой27 Dec 25 '14 at 6:06
2

Try this using :

awk 'END{print "total "NR" records are there in this file"}' file | tee -a file

or using :

echo "total $(wc -l < file) records are there in this file" >> file

or using :

sed -i "\$atotal $(wc -l < file) records are there in this file" file

or using :

ed -s file <<!
$ a
total $(wc -l < file) records are there in this file
.
w
q
!

or using ( ancestor) :

ex -s file << END_EX_COMMANDS
a
total $(wc -l < file) records are there in this file
.
w!
q
END_EX_COMMANDS
  • I suggest ditching the tee for awk '{ print } END { print "total " NR " records are in this file" }'. Other than that, I like the idea. – Wintermute Dec 24 '14 at 21:17
  • Added 3 more solutions =) – Gilles Quenot Dec 25 '14 at 5:07
0

you can also try

command line

   echo "total $(grep -c ^ <file_path>) records are there in this file" >> <file_path>

Another way

echo "total  $(cat <file_path> |wc -l) records are there in this file" >> <file_path>

< file_path > is the path of your file

0
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.016;

{
    local $^I = ".bak";  #Enables in place editing of files when reading files using the 
                         #diamond operator(<>), which is the file input operator with no file handle specified.
                         #Original file saved with .bak extension.
    local @ARGV = 'your_file.txt';  #The diamond operator(<>) reads from the file names in @ARGV.

    while (my $line = <>) {

        if (eof) {  #then you've read the last line.
            $line =~ s/\n/$.\n/;  #When reading a file, $. is assigned the current line number
        }

        print $line;
    }

}

your_file.txt:

one
two
three
four
five

program output:

one
two
three
four
five5

The variable $^I is undef by default. If you change it to something else, then it enables in place editing of a file. If you assign a string to $^I, then perl will backup the original file by creating a file with a name consisting of the original file name plus the string assigned to $^I. What perl does is:

  1. Creates a new file--its name icoporates the backup extension.
  2. Copies the contents of the original file to the new file.
  3. Opens the original file for writing, erasing it.
  4. Reads from the new file.
  5. Redirects STDOUT to the original file, so stuff you print() is written to the original file.

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