How can I throw CHECKED exceptions from inside Java 8 streams/lambdas?

In other words, I want to make code like this compile:

public List<Class> getClasses() throws ClassNotFoundException {     

    List<Class> classes = 
        Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
              .map(className -> Class.forName(className))
              .collect(Collectors.toList());                  
    return classes;
    }

This code does not compile, since the Class.forName() method above throws ClassNotFoundException, which is checked.

Please note I do NOT want to wrap the checked exception inside a runtime exception and throw the wrapped unchecked exception instead. I want to throw the checked exception itself, and without adding ugly try/catches to the stream.

  • 37
    The short answer is, you cannot, without breaking the rules regarding exceptions. You can cheat, of course, and others will gladly show you how, but be aware that this is cheating and such cheating often comes back to bite you. You should catch the exception and deal with it. If you want to wrap it, and then rethrow the checked exception after, you can do that safely. – Brian Goetz Dec 25 '14 at 15:58
  • 27
    @Brian, I don't need others to tell me how to cheat, I know how to cheat myself and posted my way of cheating in the answer below, which you downvoted. I know you are involved in the Java discussion that decided there was no good way of dealing with checked exceptions in Streams, so I find it amazing that you noticed this question of mine, but I am disappointed by your answer which just says "this is not good", gives no reason why, and then goes one adding try/catches all over again. – MarcG Dec 25 '14 at 17:50
  • 17
    @Brian, Frankly, in practice when people try to refactor legacy for-statements, half of them get converted to streams but the other half they give up refactoring, because no one wants to add these try/catches. They render the code much harder to read, certainly more than the original for-statements. In my code example above, as long as you maintain the "throws ClassNotFoundException", I don't see any difference to the outside code. Could you please give me some real life examples where this breaks rules regarding exceptions? – MarcG Dec 25 '14 at 17:53
  • 9
    Writing wrapper methods that wrap to unchecked exceptions addresses the "code clutter" objection, and doesn't break the type system. The answer here that resorts to a "sneaky throw" of a checked exception does break the type system, because calling code will not expect (nor be allowed to catch) the checked exception. – Brian Goetz Dec 25 '14 at 21:17
  • 10
    It doesn't address the code clutter objection because then you need a second try/catch around the stream, to unwrap and rethrow the original exception. On the contrary, if you throw the checked exception you just need the keep the throws ClassNotFoundException in the method declaration that contains the stream, so that the calling code will expect and be allowed to catch the checked exception. – MarcG Dec 25 '14 at 22:03

15 Answers 15

The simple answer to your question is: You can't, at least not directly. And it's not your fault. Oracle messed it up. They cling on the concept of checked exceptions, but inconsistently forgot to take care of checked exceptions when designing the functional interfaces, streams, lambda etc. That's all grist to the mill of experts like Robert C. Martin who call checked exceptions a failed experiment.

This actually is a huge bug in the API and a minor bug in the language specification.

The bug in the API is that it provides no facility for forwarding checked exceptions where this actually would make an awful lot of sense for functional programming. As I will demonstrate below, such a facility would've been easily possible.

The bug in the language specification is that it does not allow a type parameter to infer a list of types instead of a single type as long as the type parameter is only used in situations where a list of types is permissable (throws clause).

Our expectation as Java programmers is that the following code should compile:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.stream.Stream;

public class CheckedStream {
    // List variant to demonstrate what we actually had before refactoring.
    public List<Class> getClasses(final List<String> names) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        final List<Class> classes = new ArrayList<>();
        for (final String name : names)
            classes.add(Class.forName(name));
        return classes;
    }

    // The Stream function which we want to compile.
    public Stream<Class> getClasses(final Stream<String> names) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        return names.map(Class::forName);
    }
}

However, it gives:

cher@armor1:~/playground/Java/checkedStream$ javac CheckedStream.java 
CheckedStream.java:13: error: incompatible thrown types ClassNotFoundException in method reference
        return names.map(Class::forName);
                         ^
1 error

The way in which the functional interfaces are defined currently prevents the Compiler from forwarding the exception - there is no declaration which would tell Stream.map() that if Function.apply() throws E, Stream.map() throws E as well.

What's missing is a declaration of a type parameter for passing through checked exceptions. The following code shows how such a pass-through type parameter actually could have been declared with the current syntax. Except for the special case in the marked line, which is a limit discussed below, this code compiles and behaves as expected.

import java.io.IOException;
interface Function<T, R, E extends Throwable> {
    // Declare you throw E, whatever that is.
    R apply(T t) throws E;
}   

interface Stream<T> {
    // Pass through E, whatever mapper defined for E.
    <R, E extends Throwable> Stream<R> map(Function<? super T, ? extends R, E> mapper) throws E;
}   

class Main {
    public static void main(final String... args) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        final Stream<String> s = null;

        // Works: E is ClassNotFoundException.
        s.map(Class::forName);

        // Works: E is RuntimeException (probably).
        s.map(Main::convertClass);

        // Works: E is ClassNotFoundException.
        s.map(Main::throwSome);

        // Doesn't work: E is Exception.
        s.map(Main::throwSomeMore);  // error: unreported exception Exception; must be caught or declared to be thrown
    }   

    public static Class convertClass(final String s) {
        return Main.class;
    }   

    static class FooException extends ClassNotFoundException {}

    static class BarException extends ClassNotFoundException {}

    public static Class throwSome(final String s) throws FooException, BarException {
        throw new FooException();
    }   

    public static Class throwSomeMore(final String s) throws ClassNotFoundException, IOException  {
        throw new FooException();
    }   
}   

In the case of throwSomeMore we would like to see IOException being missed, but it actually misses Exception.

This is not perfect because type inference seems to be looking for a single type, even in the case of exceptions. Because the type inference needs a single type, E needs to resolve to a common super of ClassNotFoundException and IOException, which is Exception.

A tweak to the definition of type inference is needed so that the compiler would look for multiple types if the type parameter is used where a list of types is permissible (throws clause). Then the exception type reported by the compiler would be as specific as the original throws declaration of the checked exceptions of the referenced method, not a single catch-all super type.

The bad news is that this means that Oracle messed it up. Certainly they won't break user-land code, but introducing exception type parameters to the existing functional interfaces would break compilation of all user-land code that uses these interfaces explicitly. They'll have to invent some new syntax sugar to fix this.

The even worse news is that this topic was already discussed by Brian Goetz in 2010 https://blogs.oracle.com/briangoetz/entry/exception_transparency_in_java and it seems that this problem was simply ignored, so I'm wondering what Oracle is doing.

  • 14
    Interesting. I believe some people appreciate streams for allowing easier parallel code, while others for allowing cleaner code. Brian Goetz obviously cares more about parallelism (since he authored Java Concurrency in Practice), while Robert Martin cares more about clean code (since he authored the Clean Code book). Boilerplate try/catches are a minor price to pay for parallelism, so it's no wonder Brian Goetz is not appalled by the problems of using checked exceptions inside streams. Also no wonder Robert Martin hates checked exceptions since they add to the clutter. – MarcG Dec 27 '14 at 17:30
  • 4
    I predict that, in a few years, the difficulty of dealing with checked exceptions inside streams will lead to one of these two outcomes: People will just stop using checked exceptions, OR everybody will start using some hack very much like the one I posted in my UtilException answer. I would have bet Java-8 streams are the last nail on the coffin of checked exceptions, were not for the fact that checked exceptions are part of the JDK. Although I like and use checked exceptions in business code (for some specific use cases), I would have preferred all common JDK exceptions extended Runtime. – MarcG Dec 27 '14 at 17:32
  • 8
    @Unihedro The problem remains that the functional interfaces do not forward exceptions. I would need the try-catch block inside the lambda, and that simply doesn't make any sense. As soon as Class.forName is used in some way in the lambda, for example in names.forEach(Class::forName), the problem is there. Basically, methods which throw checked exceptions have been excluded from participating in functional programming as functional interfaces directly, by (poor!) design. – Christian Hujer Dec 28 '14 at 17:15
  • 23
    @ChristianHujer The "Exception transparency" exploration was just that -- an exploration (one which originated in the BGGA proposal). Upon deeper analysis, we found it to offer a poor balance of value and complexity, and it had some serious problems (led to undecidable inference problems, and "catch X" was unsound, among others.) It is extremely common that a language idea seems promising -- even "obvious" -- but after deeper exploration, turned out to be flawed. This was one of those cases. – Brian Goetz Oct 7 '15 at 16:39
  • 9
    @BrianGoetz Is there some public information available on the undecidable inference problems that you mentioned? I'm curious and would like to understand it. – Christian Hujer Oct 13 '15 at 7:22
up vote 152 down vote accepted

This LambdaExceptionUtil helper class lets you use any checked exceptions in Java streams, like this:

Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
      .map(rethrowFunction(Class::forName))
      .collect(Collectors.toList());

Note Class::forName throws ClassNotFoundException, which is checked. The stream itself also throws ClassNotFoundException, and NOT some wrapping unchecked exception.

public final class LambdaExceptionUtil {

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Consumer_WithExceptions<T, E extends Exception> {
    void accept(T t) throws E;
    }

@FunctionalInterface
public interface BiConsumer_WithExceptions<T, U, E extends Exception> {
    void accept(T t, U u) throws E;
    }

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Function_WithExceptions<T, R, E extends Exception> {
    R apply(T t) throws E;
    }

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Supplier_WithExceptions<T, E extends Exception> {
    T get() throws E;
    }

@FunctionalInterface
public interface Runnable_WithExceptions<E extends Exception> {
    void run() throws E;
    }

/** .forEach(rethrowConsumer(name -> System.out.println(Class.forName(name)))); or .forEach(rethrowConsumer(ClassNameUtil::println)); */
public static <T, E extends Exception> Consumer<T> rethrowConsumer(Consumer_WithExceptions<T, E> consumer) throws E {
    return t -> {
        try { consumer.accept(t); }
        catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); }
        };
    }

public static <T, U, E extends Exception> BiConsumer<T, U> rethrowBiConsumer(BiConsumer_WithExceptions<T, U, E> biConsumer) throws E {
    return (t, u) -> {
        try { biConsumer.accept(t, u); }
        catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); }
        };
    }

/** .map(rethrowFunction(name -> Class.forName(name))) or .map(rethrowFunction(Class::forName)) */
public static <T, R, E extends Exception> Function<T, R> rethrowFunction(Function_WithExceptions<T, R, E> function) throws E {
    return t -> {
        try { return function.apply(t); }
        catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); return null; }
        };
    }

/** rethrowSupplier(() -> new StringJoiner(new String(new byte[]{77, 97, 114, 107}, "UTF-8"))), */
public static <T, E extends Exception> Supplier<T> rethrowSupplier(Supplier_WithExceptions<T, E> function) throws E {
    return () -> {
        try { return function.get(); }
        catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); return null; }
        };
    }

/** uncheck(() -> Class.forName("xxx")); */
public static void uncheck(Runnable_WithExceptions t)
    {
    try { t.run(); }
    catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); }
    }

/** uncheck(() -> Class.forName("xxx")); */
public static <R, E extends Exception> R uncheck(Supplier_WithExceptions<R, E> supplier)
    {
    try { return supplier.get(); }
    catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); return null; }
    }

/** uncheck(Class::forName, "xxx"); */
public static <T, R, E extends Exception> R uncheck(Function_WithExceptions<T, R, E> function, T t) {
    try { return function.apply(t); }
    catch (Exception exception) { throwAsUnchecked(exception); return null; }
    }

@SuppressWarnings ("unchecked")
private static <E extends Throwable> void throwAsUnchecked(Exception exception) throws E { throw (E)exception; }

}

Many other examples on how to use it (after statically importing LambdaExceptionUtil):

@Test
public void test_Consumer_with_checked_exceptions() throws IllegalAccessException {
    Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
          .forEach(rethrowConsumer(className -> System.out.println(Class.forName(className))));

    Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
          .forEach(rethrowConsumer(System.out::println));
    }

@Test
public void test_Function_with_checked_exceptions() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    List<Class> classes1
          = Stream.of("Object", "Integer", "String")
                  .map(rethrowFunction(className -> Class.forName("java.lang." + className)))
                  .collect(Collectors.toList());

    List<Class> classes2
          = Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
                  .map(rethrowFunction(Class::forName))
                  .collect(Collectors.toList());
    }

@Test
public void test_Supplier_with_checked_exceptions() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    Collector.of(
          rethrowSupplier(() -> new StringJoiner(new String(new byte[]{77, 97, 114, 107}, "UTF-8"))),
          StringJoiner::add, StringJoiner::merge, StringJoiner::toString);
    }

@Test    
public void test_uncheck_exception_thrown_by_method() {
    Class clazz1 = uncheck(() -> Class.forName("java.lang.String"));

    Class clazz2 = uncheck(Class::forName, "java.lang.String");
    }

@Test (expected = ClassNotFoundException.class)
public void test_if_correct_exception_is_still_thrown_by_method() {
    Class clazz3 = uncheck(Class::forName, "INVALID");
    }    

NOTE 1: The rethrow methods of the LambdaExceptionUtil class above may be used without fear, and are OK to use in any situation. A big thanks to user @PaoloC who helped solve the last problem: Now the compiler will ask you to add throw clauses and everything's as if you could throw checked exceptions natively on Java 8 streams.


NOTE 2: The uncheck methods of the LambdaExceptionUtil class above are bonus methods, and may be safely removed them from the class if you don't want to use them. If you do used them, do it with care, and not before understanding the following use cases, advantages/disadvantages and limitations:

• You may use the uncheck methods if you are calling a method which literally can never throw the exception that it declares. For example: new String(byteArr, "UTF-8") throws UnsupportedEncodingException, but UTF-8 is guaranteed by the Java spec to always be present. Here, the throws declaration is a nuisance and any solution to silence it with minimal boilerplate is welcome: String text = uncheck(() -> new String(byteArr, "UTF-8"));

• You may use the uncheck methods if you are implementing a strict interface where you don't have the option for adding a throws declaration, and yet throwing an exception is entirely appropriate. Wrapping an exception just to gain the privilege of throwing it results in a stacktrace with spurious exceptions which contribute no information about what actually went wrong. A good example is Runnable.run(), which does not throw any checked exceptions.

• In any case, if you decide to use the uncheck methods, be aware of these 2 consequences of throwing CHECKED exceptions without a throws clause: 1) The calling-code won't be able to catch it by name (if you try, the compiler will say: Exception is never thrown in body of corresponding try statement). It will bubble and probably be caught in the main program loop by some "catch Exception" or "catch Throwable", which may be what you want anyway. 2) It violates the principle of least surprise: it will no longer be enough to catch RuntimeException to be able to guarantee catching all possible exceptions. For this reason, I believe this should not be done in framework code, but only in business code that you completely control.

  • 4
    I feel this answer was unjustly downvoted. The code works. Checked exceptions are supposed to be thrown or dealt with. If you want to throw them, just keep the "throws clause" in the method that contains the stream. But if you want to deal with them by simply wrapping and rethrowing, I guess I prefer to use the code above to "unckeck" the exceptions and let them bubble by themselves. The only difference I am aware of is that the bubbling exception won't extend RuntimeException. I know purists won't like that, but will this "inevitably come back to bite someone"? Doesn't seem likely. – MarcG Dec 25 '14 at 18:37
  • 3
    Especially, it was downvoted without giving any reason :( – Christian Hujer Dec 27 '14 at 12:31
  • 4
    @Christian Hujer, to be honest with the downvoter, he downvoted a previous version before I added the "advantages, disadvantages, and limitations" explanation. So maybe it was deserved at the time. You cannot teach someone how to break the rules without at least trying to understand and explain the consequences. The main reason why I posted this question was to get feedback for the disadvantages of my answer. I ended up getting this feedback not here, but from another question in programmers.stackexchange. Then I came back here and updated my answer. – MarcG Dec 27 '14 at 18:16
  • 14
    I downvoted only because this encourages unmaintainable code. This is an ugly hack, albeit a clever one, and I'll never find this answer useful. This is, again, another "do not use" of the language. – Unihedron Dec 27 '14 at 20:03
  • 10
    @Unihedro but why does it became unmaintainable? I can't see why. Any examples? – MarcG Dec 28 '14 at 17:29

You can't do this safely. You can cheat, but then your program is broken and this will inevitably come back to bite someone (it should be you, but often our cheating blows up on someone else.)

Here's a slightly safer way to do it (but I still don't recommend this.)

class WrappedException extends RuntimeException {
    Throwable cause;

    WrappedException(Throwable cause) { this.cause = cause; }
}

static WrappedException throwWrapped(Throwable t) {
    throw new WrappedException(t);
}

try 
    source.stream()
          .filter(e -> { ... try { ... } catch (IOException e) { throwWrapped(e); } ... })
          ...
}
catch (WrappedException w) {
    throw (IOException) w.cause;
}

Here, what you're doing is catching the exception in the lambda, throwing a signal out of the stream pipeline that indicates that the computation failed exceptionally, catching the signal, and acting on that signal to throw the underlying exception. The key is that you are always catching the synthetic exception, rather than allowing a checked exception to leak out without declaring that exception is thrown.

  • 14
    Just a question; what was the design decision which led to lambdas not being able to propagate checked exceptions out of their context? Note that I do understand that the functional interfaces such as Function etc don't throws anything; I'm just curious. – fge Dec 27 '14 at 18:06
  • 4
    That throw w.cause; wouldn't make the compiler complain that the method do not throws nor catch Throwable? So, it is likely that a cast to IOException would be needed there. Further, if the lambda throws more than one type of checked exception, the body of the catch would became somewhat ugly with some instanceof checks (or something else with a similar purpose) to verify which checked exception was throw. – Victor Stafusa Apr 20 '15 at 8:40
  • 9
    @schatten One reason is that you could forget to catch WE, and then a weird exception (which no one knows how to deal with) would leak out. (You might say "but you caught the exception, so its safe." In this toy example. But every time I've seen a codebase adopt this approach, eventually someone forgets. The temptation to ignore exceptions knows no bounds.) Another risk is that using it safely is specific to a particular (use site, exception) combination. It doesn't scale well to multiple exceptions or nonhomegeneous uses. – Brian Goetz Aug 24 '16 at 12:31
  • 2
    @hoodaticus I agree with you. Said that, do you prefer wrapping more and more (as shown above, increasing the risk of "forgetting") or just create 4 clever interfaces and using lambdas w/o wrapping, as shown in stackoverflow.com/a/30974991/2365724? Thanks – PaoloC Jun 12 '17 at 12:47
  • 7
    Frankly, this solution is just completely unworkable. I thought the point of streams was to reduce boilerplate, not increase it. – wvdz Jul 5 '17 at 14:43

You can!

Extending @marcg 's UtilException and adding throw E where necessary: this way, the compiler will ask you to add throw clauses and everything's as if you could throw checked exceptions natively on java 8's streams.

Instructions: just copy/paste LambdaExceptionUtil in your IDE and then use it as shown in the below LambdaExceptionUtilTest.

public final class LambdaExceptionUtil {

    @FunctionalInterface
    public interface Consumer_WithExceptions<T, E extends Exception> {
        void accept(T t) throws E;
    }

    @FunctionalInterface
    public interface Function_WithExceptions<T, R, E extends Exception> {
        R apply(T t) throws E;
    }

    /**
     * .forEach(rethrowConsumer(name -> System.out.println(Class.forName(name))));
     */
    public static <T, E extends Exception> Consumer<T> rethrowConsumer(Consumer_WithExceptions<T, E> consumer) throws E {
        return t -> {
            try {
                consumer.accept(t);
            } catch (Exception exception) {
                throwActualException(exception);
            }
        };
    }

    /**
     * .map(rethrowFunction(name -> Class.forName(name))) or .map(rethrowFunction(Class::forName))
     */
    public static <T, R, E extends Exception> Function<T, R> rethrowFunction(Function_WithExceptions<T, R, E> function) throws E  {
        return t -> {
            try {
                return function.apply(t);
            } catch (Exception exception) {
                throwActualException(exception);
                return null;
            }
        };
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    private static <E extends Exception> void throwActualException(Exception exception) throws E {
        throw (E) exception;
    }

}

Some test to show usage and behaviour:

public class LambdaExceptionUtilTest {

    @Test(expected = MyTestException.class)
    public void testConsumer() throws MyTestException {
        Stream.of((String)null).forEach(rethrowConsumer(s -> checkValue(s)));
    }

    private void checkValue(String value) throws MyTestException {
        if(value==null) {
            throw new MyTestException();
        }
    }

    private class MyTestException extends Exception { }

    @Test
    public void testConsumerRaisingExceptionInTheMiddle() {
        MyLongAccumulator accumulator = new MyLongAccumulator();
        try {
            Stream.of(2L, 3L, 4L, null, 5L).forEach(rethrowConsumer(s -> accumulator.add(s)));
            fail();
        } catch (MyTestException e) {
            assertEquals(9L, accumulator.acc);
        }
    }

    private class MyLongAccumulator {
        private long acc = 0;
        public void add(Long value) throws MyTestException {
            if(value==null) {
                throw new MyTestException();
            }
            acc += value;
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void testFunction() throws MyTestException {
        List<Integer> sizes = Stream.of("ciao", "hello").<Integer>map(rethrowFunction(s -> transform(s))).collect(toList());
        assertEquals(2, sizes.size());
        assertEquals(4, sizes.get(0).intValue());
        assertEquals(5, sizes.get(1).intValue());
    }

    private Integer transform(String value) throws MyTestException {
        if(value==null) {
            throw new MyTestException();
        }
        return value.length();
    }

    @Test(expected = MyTestException.class)
    public void testFunctionRaisingException() throws MyTestException {
        Stream.of("ciao", null, "hello").<Integer>map(rethrowFunction(s -> transform(s))).collect(toList());
    }

}
  • 1
    Sorry @setheron you're right, just add <Integer> before map. In fact, java compiler cannot infer the Integer return type. Everything else should be correct. – PaoloC Aug 7 '15 at 14:19
  • 1
    This worked for me. It made MarcG's answer perfect by enforcing handling the exception. – Skychan Sep 23 '15 at 18:24
  • 1
    Solution to above issue: Declare variable like this Consumer<ThingType> expression = rethrowConsumer((ThingType thing) -> thing.clone()); then use that expression inside the inner foreach. – Skychan Sep 29 '15 at 18:03
  • 1
    @Skychan: Since in this modified new version you are not suppressing any exceptions anymore, it's probably a bit more difficult to the inference system. In some comment below Brian Goetz talks about the "exception transparency" leading to "undecidable inference problems". – MarcG Nov 12 '15 at 19:08
  • 1
    @MarcG thanks if you think i gave a useful contribution please upvote my answers/comments – PaoloC Nov 13 '15 at 14:34

Just use any one of NoException (my project), jOOλ's Unchecked, throwing-lambdas, Throwable interfaces, or Faux Pas.

// NoException
stream.map(Exceptions.sneak().function(Class::forName));

// jOOλ
stream.map(Unchecked.function(Class::forName));

// throwing-lambdas
stream.map(Throwing.function(Class::forName).sneakyThrow());

// Throwable interfaces
stream.map(FunctionWithThrowable.aFunctionThatUnsafelyThrowsUnchecked(Class::forName));

// Faux Pas
stream.map(FauxPas.throwingFunction(Class::forName));

I wrote a library that extends the Stream API to allow you to throw checked exceptions. It uses Brian Goetz's trick.

Your code would become

public List<Class> getClasses() throws ClassNotFoundException {     
    Stream<String> classNames = 
        Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String");

    return ThrowingStream.of(classNames, ClassNotFoundException.class)
               .map(Class::forName)
               .collect(Collectors.toList());
}

This answer is similar to 17 but avoiding wrapper exception definition:

List test = new ArrayList();
        try {
            test.forEach(obj -> {

                //let say some functionality throws an exception
                try {
                    throw new IOException("test");
                }
                catch(Exception e) {
                    throw new RuntimeException(e);
                }
            });
        }
        catch (RuntimeException re) {
            if(re.getCause() instanceof IOException) {
                //do your logic for catching checked
            }
            else 
                throw re; // it might be that there is real runtime exception
        }
  • That is a simple and effective solution. – Lin W Oct 12 '17 at 16:03
  • 1
    This is exactly what Op did not want: try blocks in the lambda. Futhermore, it only works as expected as long as no other code outside the try block wraps an IOException in a RuntimeException. To avoid this, a custom wrapper-RuntimeException (defined as a private inner class) could be used. – Malte Hartwig Dec 6 '17 at 13:13

You cannot.

However, you may want to have a look at one of my projects which allows you to more easily manipulate such "throwing lambdas".

In your case, you would be able to do that:

import static com.github.fge.lambdas.functions.Functions.wrap;

final ThrowingFunction<String, Class<?>> f = wrap(Class::forName);

List<Class> classes =
    Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
          .map(f.orThrow(MyException.class))
          .collect(Collectors.toList());

and catch MyException.

That is one example. Another example is that you could .orReturn() some default value.

Note that this is STILL a work in progress, more is to come. Better names, more features etc.

  • 2
    But then, if you want to throw the original checked exception you will have to add the try/catch around the stream, to unwrap it, which is still terrible! I like the idea that you MAY throw an unchecked exception if you want, and that you MAY return a default value to the stream if you want, but I also think you should add some .orThrowChecked() method to your project that allows the checked exception itself be thrown. Please have a look at my UtilException answer in this page, and see if you like the idea of adding this third possibility to your project. – MarcG Dec 27 '14 at 17:47
  • "But then, if you want to throw the original checked exception you will have to add the try/catch around the stream, to unwrap it, which is still terrible!" <-- yes but you have no choice. Lambdas cannot propagate checked exceptions out of their context, that's a design "decision" (I view it as a flaw, personally, but ohwell) – fge Dec 27 '14 at 17:58
  • As to your idea, I don't very well follow what it does, sorry; after all you still throw as unchecked, so how is this different from what I do? (except that I have a different interface for it) – fge Dec 27 '14 at 18:02
  • Anyway, you are welcome to contribute to the project! Also, have you noticed that Stream implements AutoCloseable? – fge Dec 27 '14 at 18:04
  • Let me ask you this: Does your MyException above need to be an unchecked exception? – MarcG Dec 27 '14 at 18:07

Summarizing the comments above the advanced solution is to use a special wrapper for unchecked functions with builder like API which provides recovering, rethrowing and suppresing.

Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
          .map(Try.<String, Class<?>>safe(Class::forName)
                  .handle(System.out::println)
                  .unsafe())
          .collect(toList());

Code below demonstrates it for Consumer, Supplier and Function interfaces. It can be easly expanded. Some public keywords were removed for this example.

Class Try is the endpoint for client code. Safe methods may have unique name for each function type. CheckedConsumer, CheckedSupplier and CheckedFunction are checked analogs of lib functions which can be used independently of Try

CheckedBuilder is the interface for handling exceptions in some checked function. orTry allows execute another same type function if previous was failed. handle provides exception handling including exception type filtering. The order of handlers is important. Reduce methods unsafe and rethrow rethrows last exception in the execution chain. Reduce methods orElse and orElseGet return alternate value like Optional ones if all functions failed. Also there is method suppress. CheckedWrapper is the common implementation of CheckedBuilder.

final class Try {

    public static <T> CheckedBuilder<Supplier<T>, CheckedSupplier<T>, T> 
        safe(CheckedSupplier<T> supplier) {
        return new CheckedWrapper<>(supplier, 
                (current, next, handler, orResult) -> () -> {
            try { return current.get(); } catch (Exception ex) {
                handler.accept(ex);
                return next.isPresent() ? next.get().get() : orResult.apply(ex);
            }
        });
    }

    public static <T> Supplier<T> unsafe(CheckedSupplier<T> supplier) {
        return supplier;
    }

    public static <T> CheckedBuilder<Consumer<T>, CheckedConsumer<T>, Void> 
        safe(CheckedConsumer<T> consumer) {
        return new CheckedWrapper<>(consumer, 
                (current, next, handler, orResult) -> t -> {
            try { current.accept(t); } catch (Exception ex) {
                handler.accept(ex);
                if (next.isPresent()) {
                    next.get().accept(t);
                } else {
                    orResult.apply(ex);
                }
            }
        });
    }

    public static <T> Consumer<T> unsafe(CheckedConsumer<T> consumer) {
        return consumer;
    }

    public static <T, R> CheckedBuilder<Function<T, R>, CheckedFunction<T, R>, R> 
        safe(CheckedFunction<T, R> function) {
        return new CheckedWrapper<>(function, 
                (current, next, handler, orResult) -> t -> {
            try { return current.applyUnsafe(t); } catch (Exception ex) {
                handler.accept(ex);
                return next.isPresent() ? next.get().apply(t) : orResult.apply(ex);
            }
        });
    }

    public static <T, R> Function<T, R> unsafe(CheckedFunction<T, R> function) {
        return function;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings ("unchecked")
    static <T, E extends Throwable> T throwAsUnchecked(Throwable exception) throws E { 
        throw (E) exception; 
    }
}

@FunctionalInterface interface CheckedConsumer<T> extends Consumer<T> {
    void acceptUnsafe(T t) throws Exception;
    @Override default void accept(T t) {
        try { acceptUnsafe(t); } catch (Exception ex) {
            Try.throwAsUnchecked(ex);
        }
    }
}

@FunctionalInterface interface CheckedFunction<T, R> extends Function<T, R> {
    R applyUnsafe(T t) throws Exception;
    @Override default R apply(T t) {
        try { return applyUnsafe(t); } catch (Exception ex) {
            return Try.throwAsUnchecked(ex);
        }
    }
}

@FunctionalInterface interface CheckedSupplier<T> extends Supplier<T> {
    T getUnsafe() throws Exception;
    @Override default T get() {
        try { return getUnsafe(); } catch (Exception ex) {
            return Try.throwAsUnchecked(ex);
        }
    }
}

interface ReduceFunction<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> {
    TSafe wrap(TUnsafe current, Optional<TSafe> next, 
            Consumer<Throwable> handler, Function<Throwable, R> orResult);
}

interface CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> {
    CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> orTry(TUnsafe next);

    CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handle(Consumer<Throwable> handler);

    <E extends Throwable> CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handle(
            Class<E> exceptionType, Consumer<E> handler);

    CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handleLast(Consumer<Throwable> handler);

    <E extends Throwable> CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handleLast(
            Class<E> exceptionType, Consumer<? super E> handler);

    TSafe unsafe();
    TSafe rethrow(Function<Throwable, Exception> transformer);
    TSafe suppress();
    TSafe orElse(R value);
    TSafe orElseGet(Supplier<R> valueProvider);
}

final class CheckedWrapper<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> 
        implements CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> {

    private final TUnsafe function;
    private final ReduceFunction<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> reduceFunction;

    private final CheckedWrapper<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> root;
    private CheckedWrapper<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> next;

    private Consumer<Throwable> handlers = ex -> { };
    private Consumer<Throwable> lastHandlers = ex -> { };

    CheckedWrapper(TUnsafe function, 
            ReduceFunction<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> reduceFunction) {
        this.function = function;
        this.reduceFunction = reduceFunction;
        this.root = this;
    }

    private CheckedWrapper(TUnsafe function, 
            CheckedWrapper<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> prev) {
        this.function = function;
        this.reduceFunction = prev.reduceFunction;
        this.root = prev.root;
        prev.next = this;
    }

    @Override public CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> orTry(TUnsafe next) {
        return new CheckedWrapper<>(next, this);
    }

    @Override public CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handle(
            Consumer<Throwable> handler) {
        handlers = handlers.andThen(handler);
        return this;
    }

    @Override public <E extends Throwable> CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> 
        handle(Class<E> exceptionType, Consumer<E> handler) {
        handlers = handlers.andThen(ex -> {
            if (exceptionType.isInstance(ex)) {
                handler.accept(exceptionType.cast(ex));
            }
        });
        return this;
    }

    @Override public CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> handleLast(
            Consumer<Throwable> handler) {
        lastHandlers = lastHandlers.andThen(handler);
        return this;
    }

    @Override public <E extends Throwable> CheckedBuilder<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> 
        handleLast(Class<E> exceptionType, Consumer<? super E> handler) {
        lastHandlers = lastHandlers.andThen(ex -> {
            if (exceptionType.isInstance(ex)) {
                handler.accept(exceptionType.cast(ex));
            }
        });
        return this;
    }

    @Override public TSafe unsafe() {
        return root.reduce(ex -> Try.throwAsUnchecked(ex));
    }

    @Override
    public TSafe rethrow(Function<Throwable, Exception> transformer) {
        return root.reduce(ex -> Try.throwAsUnchecked(transformer.apply(ex)));
    }

    @Override public TSafe suppress() {
        return root.reduce(ex -> null);
    }

    @Override public TSafe orElse(R value) {
        return root.reduce(ex -> value);
    }

    @Override public TSafe orElseGet(Supplier<R> valueProvider) {
        Objects.requireNonNull(valueProvider);
        return root.reduce(ex -> valueProvider.get());
    }

    private TSafe reduce(Function<Throwable, R> orResult) {
        return reduceFunction.wrap(function, 
                Optional.ofNullable(next).map(p -> p.reduce(orResult)), 
                this::handle, orResult);
    }

    private void handle(Throwable ex) {
        for (CheckedWrapper<TSafe, TUnsafe, R> current = this; 
                current != null; 
                current = current.next) {
            current.handlers.accept(ex);
        }
        lastHandlers.accept(ex);
    }
}

I use this kind of wrapping exception:

public class CheckedExceptionWrapper extends RuntimeException {
    ...
    public <T extends Exception> CheckedExceptionWrapper rethrow() throws T {
        throw (T) getCause();
    }
}

It will require handling these exceptions statically:

void method() throws IOException, ServletException {
    try { 
        list.stream().forEach(object -> {
            ...
            throw new CheckedExceptionWrapper(e);
            ...            
        });
    } catch (CheckedExceptionWrapper e){
        e.<IOException>rethrow();
        e.<ServletExcepion>rethrow();
    }
}

Though exception will be anyway re-thrown during first rethrow() call (oh, Java generics...), this way allows to get a strict statical definition of possible exceptions (requires to declare them in throws). And no instanceof or something is needed.

TL;DR Just use Lombok's @SneakyThrows.

Christian Hujer has already explained in detail why throwing checked exceptions from a stream is, strictly speaking, not possible due to Java's limitations.

Some other answers have explained tricks to get around the limitations of the language but still being able to fulfil the requirement of throwing "the checked exception itself, and without adding ugly try/catches to the stream", some of them requiring tens of additional lines of boilerplate.

I am going to highlight another option for doing this that IMHO is far cleaner than all the others: Lombok's @SneakyThrows. It has been mentioned in passing by other answers but was a bit buried under a lot of unnecessary detail.

The resulting code is as simple as:

public List<Class> getClasses() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    List<Class> classes =
        Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String")
                .map(className -> getClass(className))
                .collect(Collectors.toList());
    return classes;
}

@SneakyThrows                                 // <= this is the only new code
private Class<?> getClass(String className) {
    return Class.forName(className);
}

We just needed one Extract Method refactoring (done by the IDE) and one additional line for @SneakyThrows. The annotation takes care of adding all the boilerplate to make sure that you can throw your checked exception without wrapping it in a RuntimeException and without needing to declare it explicitly.

I agree with the comments above, in using Stream.map you are limited to implementing Function which doesn't throw Exceptions.

You could however create your own FunctionalInterface that throws as below..

@FunctionalInterface
public interface UseInstance<T, X extends Throwable> {
  void accept(T instance) throws X;
}

then implement it using Lambdas or references as shown below.

import java.io.FileWriter;
import java.io.IOException;

//lambda expressions and the execute around method (EAM) pattern to
//manage resources

public class FileWriterEAM  {
  private final FileWriter writer;

  private FileWriterEAM(final String fileName) throws IOException {
    writer = new FileWriter(fileName);
  }
  private void close() throws IOException {
    System.out.println("close called automatically...");
    writer.close();
  }
  public void writeStuff(final String message) throws IOException {
    writer.write(message);
  }
  //...

  public static void use(final String fileName, final UseInstance<FileWriterEAM, IOException> block) throws IOException {

    final FileWriterEAM writerEAM = new FileWriterEAM(fileName);    
    try {
      block.accept(writerEAM);
    } finally {
      writerEAM.close();
    }
  }

  public static void main(final String[] args) throws IOException {

    FileWriterEAM.use("eam.txt", writerEAM -> writerEAM.writeStuff("sweet"));

    FileWriterEAM.use("eam2.txt", writerEAM -> {
        writerEAM.writeStuff("how");
        writerEAM.writeStuff("sweet");      
      });

    FileWriterEAM.use("eam3.txt", FileWriterEAM::writeIt);     

  }


 void writeIt() throws IOException{
     this.writeStuff("How ");
     this.writeStuff("sweet ");
     this.writeStuff("it is");

 }

}

The only built-in way of handling checked exceptions that can be thrown by a map operation is to encapsulate them within a CompletableFuture. (An Optional is a simpler alternative if you don't need to preserve the exception.) These classes are intended to allow you to represent contingent operations in a functional way.

A couple of non-trivial helper methods are required, but you can arrive at code that's relatively concise, while still making it apparent that your stream's result is contingent on the map operation having completed successfully. Here's what it looks like:

    CompletableFuture<List<Class<?>>> classes =
            Stream.of("java.lang.String", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.Double")
                  .map(MonadUtils.applyOrDie(Class::forName))
                  .map(cfc -> cfc.thenApply(Class::getSuperclass))
                  .collect(MonadUtils.cfCollector(ArrayList::new,
                                                  List::add,
                                                  (List<Class<?>> l1, List<Class<?>> l2) -> { l1.addAll(l2); return l1; },
                                                  x -> x));
    classes.thenAccept(System.out::println)
           .exceptionally(t -> { System.out.println("unable to get class: " + t); return null; });

This produces the following output:

[class java.lang.Object, class java.lang.Number, class java.lang.Number]

The applyOrDie method takes a Function that throws an exception, and converts it into a Function that returns an already-completed CompletableFuture -- either completed normally with the original function's result, or completed exceptionally with the thrown exception.

The second map operation illustrates that you've now got a Stream<CompletableFuture<T>> instead of just a Stream<T>. CompletableFuture takes care of only executing this operation if the upstream operation succeeded. The API makes this explict, but relatively painless.

Until you get to the collect phase, that is. This is where we require a pretty significant helper method. We want to "lift" a normal collection operation (in this case, toList()) "inside" the CompletableFuture -- cfCollector() lets us do that using a supplier, accumulator, combiner, and finisher that don't need to know anything at all about CompletableFuture.

The helper methods can be found on GitHub in my MonadUtils class, which is very much still a work in progress.

I think this approach is the right one:

public List<Class> getClasses() throws ClassNotFoundException {
    List<Class> classes;
    try {
        classes = Stream.of("java.lang.Object", "java.lang.Integer", "java.lang.String").map(className -> {
            try {
                return Class.forName(className);
            } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
                throw new UndeclaredThrowableException(e);
            }
        }).collect(Collectors.toList());
    } catch (UndeclaredThrowableException e) {
        if (e.getCause() instanceof ClassNotFoundException) {
            throw (ClassNotFoundException) e.getCause();
        } else {
            // this should never happen
            throw new IllegalStateException(e.getMessage(), e);
        }
    }
    return classes;
}

Wrapping the checked exception inside the Callable in a UndeclaredThrowableException (that’s the use case for this exception) and unwrapping it outside.

Yes, I find it ugly, and I would advise against using lambdas in this case and just fall back to a good old loop, unless you are working with a parallel stream and paralellization brings an objective benefit that justifies the unreadability of the code.

As many others have pointed out, there are solutions to this situation, and I hope one of them will make it into a future version of Java.

  • (1) There are already several answers showing an example like this, so what does your answer add to the Q&A that's not already covered? Posting duplicate answers like this just adds clutter to the site. (2) The OP specifically says they don't want to do this. "Please note I do NOT want to wrap the checked exception inside a runtime exception and throw the wrapped unchecked exception instead." – Radiodef Aug 9 at 19:09

Probably, a better and more functional way is to wrap exceptions and propagate them further in the stream. Take a look at the Try type of Vavr for example.

Example:

interface CheckedFunction<I, O> {
    O apply(I i) throws Exception; }

static <I, O> Function<I, O> unchecked(CheckedFunction<I, O> f) {
    return i -> {
        try {
            return f.apply(i);
        } catch(Exception ex) {

            throw new RuntimeException(ex);
        }
    } }

fileNamesToRead.map(unchecked(file -> Files.readAllLines(file)))

OR

@SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
private static <T, E extends Exception> T throwUnchecked(Exception e) throws E {
    throw (E) e;
}

static <I, O> Function<I, O> unchecked(CheckedFunction<I, O> f) {
    return arg -> {
        try {
            return f.apply(arg);
        } catch(Exception ex) {
            return throwUnchecked(ex);
        }
    };
}

2nd implementation avoids wrapping the exception in a RuntimeException. throwUnchecked works because almost always all generic exceptions are treated as unchecked in java.

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