8

SVG can perform transformations like so

<g transform="translate(80,0)">

Also, whenever this attribute is manipulated by javascript for example the SVG will move to the new point. (or scale etc.)

I was wondering whether it was possible to set an event listener that runs each time any SVG object in the document is changed. This is more of a concept question of how do browsers keep polling all the SVG elements and is there a nice way to intercept that change.

I tried doing my homework understanding how SVGs work and it seems like they have a transformation matrix that can be accessed via the DOM. The question is how does the browser know when to make that change.

References:

  1. http://www.w3.org/TR/SVG/struct.html
  2. https://www.dashingd3js.com/svg-group-element-and-d3js
  3. http://sarasoueidan.com/blog/svg-transformations/

In short, is there an event listener in javascript that can be built to listen for changes of SVG's in genereal

5

You can use a mutation observer to listen to DOM changes. This won't react to SMIL changes though, just attribute and element changes.

Mutation events may contain multiple DOM changes as they are sent asynchronously.

  • +1 for mention the mutation observers, interesting thing – Tom Sarduy Dec 25 '14 at 21:23
1

This is a very good question, for me SVG is like a Frankenstein but in a good way, you can animate SVG using the DOM, CSS or Javascript and is widely supported on these days. This sentence in the W3 is relevant:

[...] After the first modification the object becomes live, such that any modifications made to the corresponding attribute are immediately reflected in the object.

The SVG DOM builds upon and is compatible with DOM elements, so you can have all the event listeners you use normally with the DOM (click, hover, load..). Apart of that, I think the more important are this 3:

beginEvent: Occurs when an animation element begins. For details, see the description of Interface TimeEvent in the SMIL Animation specification.

endEvent: Occurs when an animation element ends. For details, see the description of Interface TimeEvent in the SMIL Animation specification.

repeatEvent: Occurs when an animation element repeats. It is raised each time the element repeats, after the first iteration. For details, see the description of Interface TimeEvent in the SMIL Animation specification.

Complete list of supported events

If you need more than that then my advice is to check the SMIL Animation Model

  • @torazaburo Did I said that? – Tom Sarduy Dec 26 '14 at 16:03
  • Kudos for the explanation about SVG. But yeah – cjds Dec 26 '14 at 16:38
  • @torazaburo: Sorry for my english, but I'm reading (...) set an event listener that runs each time any SVG object in the document is changed, and there are more than 1 way (attributes) to "change" an SVG element (via CSS, JS)? – Tom Sarduy Dec 26 '14 at 16:46
0

To my knowledge, there's no standard way to listen for the direct manipulation of a DOM attribute (though you could catch it via transitions if it was the style attribute/CSS). Events arise from interaction between the user and the browser (think click, resize, mouseover, etc.). Directly modifying an attribute is not something that a normal user would ever do.

If you'd like to attach event listeners to a SVG changing, it would be better to listen for the user interaction event which is causing the change or whatever in your code is causing the change to happen. If you have an animation/transition running after the interaction, which you need to listen for the end of, you can listen for the end of that using D3.

  • Haha. :-) It was through looking at the D3 library that I came to wondering about this. The way the library is set up, it makes use of these transitions without listening for them. The problem with that is if you change it in any way other than the D3 way (such as during initialization) the state isn't saved. And I wondered if I could improve the library by doing this – cjds Dec 25 '14 at 20:55
  • One of the particular "problems" this causes is stackoverflow.com/questions/27570565/… which is solved in a hackish manner – cjds Dec 25 '14 at 20:58
  • Oh I see. Well if you're poking around in the D3 source code, is there any way the problem of initialization (though not further non-D3 changes) be solved by automatically incorporating the state of the node into this.__chart__? I assume you've already tried that though... – bnjmnhndrsn Dec 25 '14 at 21:22
  • Actually there is precisely a way to listen for the direct manipulation of a DOM attribute, which is mutation observers, as described in another answer. – user663031 Dec 26 '14 at 4:17

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