2

This is probably not a "best practice", but I want to add my custom loop statements:

#define repeat(count) for(int _repeat_i = 0; _repeat_i < (count); _repeat_i++)

Then this will work fine:

repeat(5) {
    do_stuff();
}

But I can't nest it:

repeat(5) {
    do_big_stuff();

    repeat(3) {
        do_little_stuff();
    }
}

... because the variable names will clash.

Any way to generate unique variable name in the macro?

2
  • Won't you usually need the loop index inside the loop? Why not modify your macro to take that in, thus manually resolving clashes?
    – Pradhan
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:20
  • That would be another variant of the macro, but here I don't need the index (example - I want to flash a LED 5 times). Think about the recursive macro example - there you hard-wire the loop name, but it will clash with the nested loop
    – MightyPork
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:23

3 Answers 3

6

Several compilers support the __COUNTER__ macro variable that could be used to help avoid variable shadowing (you will still need to add a sufficiently unique prefix).

An example is given at: http://rentzsch.tumblr.com/post/12960046342/nearly-hygienic-c-macros-via-counter

The idea is to create a macro that take in the variable name suffix to use, then wrap that with a second macro that passes in __COUNTER__ to generate a unique suffix.

0
6

A common workaround this problem is to pass the name of the variable to the macro:

#define repeat(v,count) for(int v = 0; v < (count); v++)

Now you can write things like repeat(i,5) and repeat(j,3) to avoid redefinition of variables.

You can also use __LINE__ to compose a variable name, like this:

#define repeat(count) for(int _repeat_##__LINE__ = 0; _repeat_##__LINE__ < (count); _repeat_##__LINE__++)

It is not ideal, because two repeat(...) statements on the same line would produce an error.

However, for most practical purposes this macro is going to do the job:

repeat(2) {
    repeat(3) {
        printf("hello\n");
    }
}

Demo.

3
  • Good idea, the __COUNTER__ option mentioned by Hargobind looks better than __LINE__ though.
    – MightyPork
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:32
  • 1
    @MightyPork It's harder to use __COUNTER__ - you'd have to use two levels of macros, because otherwise you wouldn't be able to reuse the name because the counter would increment. On top of that, __COUNTER__ is not standard, so your code would have questionable portability. Dec 25, 2014 at 23:35
  • Actually, following the idea from the other answer, it's easy with counter: ideone.com/POevT7 Portability is OK I guess, it'll be always compiled with GCC.
    – MightyPork
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:39
4

What you've written is completely fine. It will compile to:

for(int _repeat_i = 0; _repeat_i < (5); _repeat_i++) {
    do_big_stuff();

    for(int _repeat_i = 0; _repeat_i < (3); _repeat_i++) {
        do_little_stuff();
    }
}

If you really wanted unique names though, you could use the macro __COUNTER__ or __LINE__ to generate unique variable names.

3
  • Are you sure this will compile, and won't cause some kind of infinite loop? You can shadow a variable in nested scope? Sorry, I used to work with java.. maybe that's why I don't get this..
    – MightyPork
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:31
  • Yes. You can shadow variables in nested scopes in C++.
    – Bill Lynch
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:46
  • 1
    Yes. Sorry, I was thinking this was a C++ question. But the above code works in both C and C++.
    – Bill Lynch
    Dec 25, 2014 at 23:48

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