287

I'm making an application which uses a UITextView. Now I want the Text View to have a placeholder similar to the one you can set for a Text Field. How would you accomplish this using swift.

Does anyone know how to do this?

  • This is an age old problem in iOS development with UITextView. I've written subclasses like the one mentioned here: stackoverflow.com/a/1704469/1403046 . The benefit is that you can still have a delegate, as well as use the class in multiple places without having to re-implement the logic. – cjwirth Dec 26 '14 at 3:28
  • How would I use your subclass, while using swift for the project. Using a bridge file? – StevenR Dec 26 '14 at 3:49
  • You could do that, or re-implement it in Swift. The code in the answer is longer than it really has to be. The main point being to show/hide the label you add in the method you get notified for when the text changes. – cjwirth Dec 26 '14 at 3:52
  • You can use UIFloatLabelTextView sample from GitHub. This position placeholder on top while writing. Really interesting one! github.com/ArtSabintsev/UIFloatLabelTextView – Jayprakash Dubey Aug 1 '16 at 8:14
  • 1
    Honestly, the easiest way to accomplish this is to have a custom textView and just add placeholder text that is drawn onto the textView when no text is present.... Ever other answer so far has been a far overcomplicated version of this that involves problematic state management (including false positives for when text should/shouldn't does/doesn't exist) – TheCodingArt Dec 31 '16 at 19:09

36 Answers 36

560

Updated for Swift 4

UITextView doesn't inherently have a placeholder property so you'd have to create and manipulate one programmatically using UITextViewDelegate methods. I recommend using either solution #1 or #2 below depending on the desired behavior.

Note: For either solution, add UITextViewDelegate to the class and set textView.delegate = self to use the text view’s delegate methods.


Solution #1 - If you want the placeholder to disappear as soon as the user selects the text view:

First set the UITextView to contain the placeholder text and set it to a light gray color to mimic the look of a UITextField's placeholder text. Either do so in the viewDidLoad or upon the text view's creation.

textView.text = "Placeholder"
textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray

Then when the user begins to edit the text view, if the text view contains a placeholder (i.e. if its text color is light gray) clear the placeholder text and set the text color to black in order to accommodate the user's entry.

func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
    if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGray {
        textView.text = nil
        textView.textColor = UIColor.black
    }
}

Then when the user finishes editing the text view and it's resigned as the first responder, if the text view is empty, reset its placeholder by re-adding the placeholder text and setting its color to light gray.

func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
    if textView.text.isEmpty {
        textView.text = "Placeholder"
        textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
    }
}

Solution #2 - If you want the placeholder to show whenever the text view is empty, even if the text view’s selected:

First set the placeholder in the viewDidLoad:

textView.text = "Placeholder"
textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray

textView.becomeFirstResponder()

textView.selectedTextRange = textView.textRange(from: textView.beginningOfDocument, to: textView.beginningOfDocument)

(Note: Since the OP wanted to have the text view selected as soon as the view loads, I incorporated text view selection into the above code. If this is not your desired behavior and you do not want the text view selected upon view load, remove the last two lines from the above code chunk.)

Then utilize the shouldChangeTextInRange UITextViewDelegate method, like so:

func textView(_ textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextIn range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {

    // Combine the textView text and the replacement text to
    // create the updated text string
    let currentText:String = textView.text
    let updatedText = (currentText as NSString).replacingCharacters(in: range, with: text)

    // If updated text view will be empty, add the placeholder
    // and set the cursor to the beginning of the text view
    if updatedText.isEmpty {

        textView.text = "Placeholder"
        textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray

        textView.selectedTextRange = textView.textRange(from: textView.beginningOfDocument, to: textView.beginningOfDocument)
    }

    // Else if the text view's placeholder is showing and the
    // length of the replacement string is greater than 0, set 
    // the text color to black then set its text to the
    // replacement string
     else if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGray && !text.isEmpty {
        textView.textColor = UIColor.black
        textView.text = text
    }

    // For every other case, the text should change with the usual
    // behavior...
    else {
        return true
    }

    // ...otherwise return false since the updates have already
    // been made
    return false
}

And also implement textViewDidChangeSelection to prevent the user from changing the position of the cursor while the placeholder's visible. (Note: textViewDidChangeSelection is called before the view loads so only check the text view's color if the window is visible):

func textViewDidChangeSelection(_ textView: UITextView) {
    if self.view.window != nil {
        if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGray {
            textView.selectedTextRange = textView.textRange(from: textView.beginningOfDocument, to: textView.beginningOfDocument)
        }
    }
}
  • 5
    Hi, make sure you set your view controller as the delegate for your textView. You can achieve this by creating an outlet from your textView to your viewController. Then use yourTextField.delegate = self. If you do not do this, the textViewDidBeginEditing and the textViewDidEndEditing functions will not work. – Ujjwal-Nadhani Apr 23 '16 at 17:05
  • 2
    The code is not compiling, I am having an error as Cannot convert value of type 'NSRange' (aka '_NSRange') to expected argument type 'Range<String.Index>' (aka 'Range<String.CharacterView.Index>'). – iPeter Jun 27 '17 at 15:02
  • 4
    I have found the solution and I will attach the revised code @iPeter . The current text must be in NSString formant: let currentText = textView.text as NSString?. Transform the let updatedText = line to let updatedText = currentText?.replacingCharacters(in: range, with: text). Finally, transform the if updatedText.isEmpty line to if (updatedText?.isEmpty)! {. That should do the trick! – Baylor Mitchell Jul 14 '17 at 22:21
  • 3
    @LyndseyScott setting textView.selectedTextRange from within func textViewDidChangeSelection(_ textView: UITextView) causes an infinite loop... – MikeG Feb 5 at 18:37
  • 2
    and it crashes with Thread 1: EXC_BAD_ACCESS (code=2, ...) – MikeG Feb 5 at 18:47
209

Floating Placeholder


It's simple, safe and reliable to position a placeholder label above a text view, set its font, color and manage placeholder visibility by tracking changes to the text view's character count.

Swift 3:

class NotesViewController : UIViewController, UITextViewDelegate {

    @IBOutlet var textView : UITextView!
    var placeholderLabel : UILabel!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()

        textView.delegate = self
        placeholderLabel = UILabel()
        placeholderLabel.text = "Enter some text..."
        placeholderLabel.font = UIFont.italicSystemFont(ofSize: (textView.font?.pointSize)!)
        placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()
        textView.addSubview(placeholderLabel)
        placeholderLabel.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: 5, y: (textView.font?.pointSize)! / 2)
        placeholderLabel.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !textView.text.isEmpty
    }

    func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !textView.text.isEmpty
    }
}

Swift 2: Same, except:italicSystemFontOfSize(textView.font.pointSize), UIColor.lightGrayColor


  • 13
    This method is undeniably the simplest and least error-prone I've found. Fabulous. – David Feb 3 '15 at 2:17
  • 6
    It is a good method but label text may go out of bound if placeholder text is very long.. – Aks Feb 3 '15 at 7:02
  • 5
    Simple to use and integrates nicely with existing behavior. The placeholder message should not be so verbose anyway however wouldn't setting the lines to 0 take care of that issue? – Tommie C. Nov 4 '15 at 13:59
  • 2
    I generally prefer this method, though it is problematic if the text is center aligned because the cursor will be centered on top of the placeholder instead of to the left of it. – blwinters Jun 21 '17 at 15:31
  • 1
    @blwinters - That would be a really unusual corner case wouldn't it? But assuming it is a multi-line input field in that case (I have to assume that), couldn't you just adjust the vertical offset calculation to move the placeholder text away from the cursor a bit? – clearlight Jun 27 '17 at 0:15
28

Strongly recommend to use the KMPlaceholderTextView library. Very simple to use.

  • Agreed. Couldn't be easier to use and works a charm – 365SplendidSuns Mar 9 '16 at 7:56
  • don't work for right to left – john07 Aug 24 '16 at 8:43
  • This is by far the easiest solution (does not involve adding UILabels or doing special delegate stuff). Works out of the box. – HixField Aug 27 '16 at 18:56
  • does it work on swift 3.1? i dont think so – Vaibhav Saran Sep 17 '17 at 13:34
  • It should work. The author said that it supports Swift 3.0+ – t4nhpt Sep 17 '17 at 14:06
21

Swift:

Add your text view programmatically or via Interface Builder, if the last, create the outlet:

@IBOutlet weak var yourTextView: UITextView!

Please add the delegate (UITextViewDelegate):

class ViewController: UIViewController, UITextViewDelegate {

In the viewDidLoad method, do add the following:

override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        // Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.

    yourTextView.delegate = self
    yourTextView.text = "Placeholder text goes right here..."
    yourTextView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray

Now let me introduce the magic part, add this function:

func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {

    if yourTextView.textColor == UIColor.lightGray {
        yourTextView.text = ""
        yourTextView.textColor = UIColor.black
    }
}

Do note that this will execute whenever editing starts, there we will check conditions to tell the state, using the color property. Setting text to nil i do not recommend. Right after that, we set the text color to desired, in this case, black.

Now add this function too:

func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {

    if yourTextView.text == "" {

        yourTextView.text = "Placeholder text ..."
        yourTextView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
    }
}

Let me insist, do not compare to nil, i have already tried that and it would not work. We then set the values back to placeholder style, and set the color back to placeholder color because it is a condition to check in textViewDidBeginEditing.

14

I did this by using two different text views:

  1. One in the background that is used as a placeholder.
  2. One in the foreground (with a transparent background) that the user actually types in.

The idea is that once the user starts typing stuff in the foreground view, the placeholder in the background disappears (and reappears if the user deletes everything). So it behaves exactly like a placeholder for the single line text field.

Here's the code I used for it. Note that descriptionField is the field the user types in and descriptionPlaceholder is the one in the background.

func textViewDidChange(descriptionField: UITextView) {
    if descriptionField.text.isEmpty == false {
        descriptionPlaceholder.text = ""
    } else {
        descriptionPlaceholder.text = descriptionPlaceholderText
    }
}
  • 1
    This way is a bit hacky but it's far and away the easiest and generates exactly the results you want. Good idea – William T. Jun 11 '17 at 18:14
14

Use This Extension this is the best way to set placeholder in UITextView. But make sure you have attached delegates to the TextView. You can set Place holder like this:-

yourTextView.placeholder = "Placeholder" 

extension UITextView :UITextViewDelegate
{

    /// Resize the placeholder when the UITextView bounds change
    override open var bounds: CGRect {
        didSet {
            self.resizePlaceholder()
        }
    }

    /// The UITextView placeholder text
    public var placeholder: String? {
        get {
            var placeholderText: String?

            if let placeholderLabel = self.viewWithTag(100) as? UILabel {
                placeholderText = placeholderLabel.text
            }

            return placeholderText
        }
        set {
            if let placeholderLabel = self.viewWithTag(100) as! UILabel? {
                placeholderLabel.text = newValue
                placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()
            } else {
                self.addPlaceholder(newValue!)
            }
        }
    }

    /// When the UITextView did change, show or hide the label based on if the UITextView is empty or not
    ///
    /// - Parameter textView: The UITextView that got updated
    public func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
        if let placeholderLabel = self.viewWithTag(100) as? UILabel {
            placeholderLabel.isHidden = self.text.characters.count > 0
        }
    }

    /// Resize the placeholder UILabel to make sure it's in the same position as the UITextView text
    private func resizePlaceholder() {
        if let placeholderLabel = self.viewWithTag(100) as! UILabel? {
            let labelX = self.textContainer.lineFragmentPadding
            let labelY = self.textContainerInset.top - 2
            let labelWidth = self.frame.width - (labelX * 2)
            let labelHeight = placeholderLabel.frame.height

            placeholderLabel.frame = CGRect(x: labelX, y: labelY, width: labelWidth, height: labelHeight)
        }
    }

    /// Adds a placeholder UILabel to this UITextView
    private func addPlaceholder(_ placeholderText: String) {
        let placeholderLabel = UILabel()

        placeholderLabel.text = placeholderText
        placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()

        placeholderLabel.font = self.font
        placeholderLabel.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        placeholderLabel.tag = 100

        placeholderLabel.isHidden = self.text.characters.count > 0

        self.addSubview(placeholderLabel)
        self.resizePlaceholder()
        self.delegate = self
    }
}
  • 1
    Worked like charms !! Thank u so much ! :) – Nahid Raihan Oct 17 '18 at 4:19
  • Welcome Dear All the best – Sandip Gill Oct 17 '18 at 4:51
7

I am surprised that no one mentioned NSTextStorageDelegate. UITextViewDelegate's methods will only be triggered by user interaction, but not programmatically. E.g. when you set a text view's text property programmatically, you'll have to set the placeholder's visibility yourself, because the delegate methods will not be called.

However, with NSTextStorageDelegate's textStorage(_:didProcessEditing:range:changeInLength:) method, you'll be notified of any change to the text, even if it's done programmatically. Just assign it like this:

textView.textStorage.delegate = self

(In UITextView, this delegate property is nil by default, so it won't affect any default behaviour.)

Combine it with the UILabel technique @clearlight demonstrates, one can easily wrap the whole UITextView's placeholder implementation into an extension.

extension UITextView {

    private class PlaceholderLabel: UILabel { }

    private var placeholderLabel: PlaceholderLabel {
        if let label = subviews.compactMap( { $0 as? PlaceholderLabel }).first {
            return label
        } else {
            let label = PlaceholderLabel(frame: .zero)
            label.font = font
            addSubview(label)
            return label
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable
    var placeholder: String {
        get {
            return subviews.compactMap( { $0 as? PlaceholderLabel }).first?.text ?? ""
        }
        set {
            let placeholderLabel = self.placeholderLabel
            placeholderLabel.text = newValue
            placeholderLabel.numberOfLines = 0
            let width = frame.width - textContainer.lineFragmentPadding * 2
            let size = placeholderLabel.sizeThatFits(CGSize(width: width, height: .greatestFiniteMagnitude))
            placeholderLabel.frame.size.height = size.height
            placeholderLabel.frame.size.width = width
            placeholderLabel.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: textContainer.lineFragmentPadding, y: textContainerInset.top)

            textStorage.delegate = self
        }
    }

}

extension UITextView: NSTextStorageDelegate {

    public func textStorage(_ textStorage: NSTextStorage, didProcessEditing editedMask: NSTextStorageEditActions, range editedRange: NSRange, changeInLength delta: Int) {
        if editedMask.contains(.editedCharacters) {
            placeholderLabel.isHidden = !text.isEmpty
        }
    }

}

Note that the use of a private (nested) class called PlaceholderLabel. It has no implementation at all, but it provides us a way to identify the placeholder label, which is far more 'swifty' than using the tag property.

With this approach, you can still assign the delegate of the UITextView to someone else.

You don't even have to change your text views' classes. Just add the extension(s) and you will be able to assign a placeholder string to every UITextView in your project, even in the Interface Builder.

I left out the implementation of a placeholderColor property for clarity reasons, but it can be implemented for just a few more lines with a similar computed variable to placeholder.

  • Very elegant solution. I love it. – Dave Batton Dec 30 '18 at 19:35
  • textView.textStorage.delegate = self this in a view-controller will require us to bind that view-controller with NSTextStorageDelegate. It is really requires? – Hemang Aug 8 at 8:21
6

SET value in view load

    txtVw!.autocorrectionType = UITextAutocorrectionType.No
    txtVw!.text = "Write your Placeholder"
    txtVw!.textColor = UIColor.lightGrayColor()



func textViewDidBeginEditing(textView: UITextView) {
    if (txtVw?.text == "Write your Placeholder")

    {
        txtVw!.text = nil
        txtVw!.textColor = UIColor.blackColor()
    }
}

func textViewDidEndEditing(textView: UITextView) {
    if txtVw!.text.isEmpty
    {
        txtVw!.text = "Write your Placeholder"
        txtVw!.textColor = UIColor.lightGrayColor()
    }
    textView.resignFirstResponder()
}
5

One more solution (Swift 3):

import UIKit

protocol PlaceholderTextViewDelegate {
    func placeholderTextViewDidChangeText(_ text:String)
    func placeholderTextViewDidEndEditing(_ text:String)
}

final class PlaceholderTextView: UITextView {

    var notifier:PlaceholderTextViewDelegate?

    var placeholder: String? {
        didSet {
            placeholderLabel?.text = placeholder
        }
    }
    var placeholderColor = UIColor.lightGray
    var placeholderFont = UIFont.appMainFontForSize(14.0) {
        didSet {
            placeholderLabel?.font = placeholderFont
        }
    }

    fileprivate var placeholderLabel: UILabel?

    // MARK: - LifeCycle

    init() {
        super.init(frame: CGRect.zero, textContainer: nil)
        awakeFromNib()
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    }

    override func awakeFromNib() {
        super.awakeFromNib()

        self.delegate = self
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(PlaceholderTextView.textDidChangeHandler(notification:)), name: .UITextViewTextDidChange, object: nil)

        placeholderLabel = UILabel()
        placeholderLabel?.textColor = placeholderColor
        placeholderLabel?.text = placeholder
        placeholderLabel?.textAlignment = .left
        placeholderLabel?.numberOfLines = 0
    }

    override func layoutSubviews() {
        super.layoutSubviews()

        placeholderLabel?.font = placeholderFont

        var height:CGFloat = placeholderFont.lineHeight
        if let data = placeholderLabel?.text {

            let expectedDefaultWidth:CGFloat = bounds.size.width
            let fontSize:CGFloat = placeholderFont.pointSize

            let textView = UITextView()
            textView.text = data
            textView.font = UIFont.appMainFontForSize(fontSize)
            let sizeForTextView = textView.sizeThatFits(CGSize(width: expectedDefaultWidth,
                                                               height: CGFloat.greatestFiniteMagnitude))
            let expectedTextViewHeight = sizeForTextView.height

            if expectedTextViewHeight > height {
                height = expectedTextViewHeight
            }
        }

        placeholderLabel?.frame = CGRect(x: 5, y: 0, width: bounds.size.width - 16, height: height)

        if text.isEmpty {
            addSubview(placeholderLabel!)
            bringSubview(toFront: placeholderLabel!)
        } else {
            placeholderLabel?.removeFromSuperview()
        }
    }

    func textDidChangeHandler(notification: Notification) {
        layoutSubviews()
    }

}

extension PlaceholderTextView : UITextViewDelegate {
    // MARK: - UITextViewDelegate
    func textView(_ textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextIn range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {
        if(text == "\n") {
            textView.resignFirstResponder()
            return false
        }
        return true
    }

    func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
        notifier?.placeholderTextViewDidChangeText(textView.text)
    }

    func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
        notifier?.placeholderTextViewDidEndEditing(textView.text)
    }
}

result

enter image description here

5

Based on some of the great suggestions here already, I was able to put together the following lightweight, Interface-Builder-compatible subclass of UITextView, which:

  • Includes configurable placeholder text, styled just like that of UITextField.
  • Doesn't require any additional subviews or constraints.
  • Doesn't require any delegation or other behaviour from the ViewController.
  • Doesn't require any notifications.
  • Keeps that text fully separated from any outside classes looking at the field's text property.

Any improvement suggestions are welcome, especially if there's any way to pull iOS's placeholder color programatically, rather than hard-coding it.

Swift v5:

import UIKit
@IBDesignable class TextViewWithPlaceholder: UITextView {

    override var text: String! { // Ensures that the placeholder text is never returned as the field's text
        get {
            if showingPlaceholder {
                return "" // When showing the placeholder, there's no real text to return
            } else { return super.text }
        }
        set { super.text = newValue }
    }
    @IBInspectable var placeholderText: String = ""
    @IBInspectable var placeholderTextColor: UIColor = UIColor(red: 0.78, green: 0.78, blue: 0.80, alpha: 1.0) // Standard iOS placeholder color (#C7C7CD). See https://stackoverflow.com/questions/31057746/whats-the-default-color-for-placeholder-text-in-uitextfield
    private var showingPlaceholder: Bool = true // Keeps track of whether the field is currently showing a placeholder

    override func didMoveToWindow() {
        super.didMoveToWindow()
        if text.isEmpty {
            showPlaceholderText() // Load up the placeholder text when first appearing, but not if coming back to a view where text was already entered
        }
    }

    override func becomeFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        // If the current text is the placeholder, remove it
        if showingPlaceholder {
            text = nil
            textColor = nil // Put the text back to the default, unmodified color
            showingPlaceholder = false
        }
        return super.becomeFirstResponder()
    }

    override func resignFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        // If there's no text, put the placeholder back
        if text.isEmpty {
            showPlaceholderText()
        }
        return super.resignFirstResponder()
    }

    private func showPlaceholderText() {
        showingPlaceholder = true
        textColor = placeholderTextColor
        text = placeholderText
    }
}
4

A simple and quick solution that works for me is:

@IBDesignable
class PlaceHolderTextView: UITextView {

    @IBInspectable var placeholder: String = "" {
         didSet{
             updatePlaceHolder()
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable var placeholderColor: UIColor = UIColor.gray {
        didSet {
            updatePlaceHolder()
        }
    }

    private var originalTextColor = UIColor.darkText
    private var originalText: String = ""

    private func updatePlaceHolder() {

        if self.text == "" || self.text == placeholder  {

            self.text = placeholder
            self.textColor = placeholderColor
            if let color = self.textColor {

                self.originalTextColor = color
            }
            self.originalText = ""
        } else {
            self.textColor = self.originalTextColor
            self.originalText = self.text
        }

    }

    override func becomeFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        let result = super.becomeFirstResponder()
        self.text = self.originalText
        self.textColor = self.originalTextColor
        return result
    }
    override func resignFirstResponder() -> Bool {
        let result = super.resignFirstResponder()
        updatePlaceHolder()

        return result
    }
}
3

I don't know why people over complicate this issue so much.... It's fairly straight forward and simple. Here's a subclass of UITextView that provides the requested functionality.

- (void)customInit
{
    self.contentMode = UIViewContentModeRedraw;
    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self selector:@selector(textChanged:) name:UITextViewTextDidChangeNotification object:nil];
}

    - (void)textChanged:(NSNotification *)notification
    {
        if (notification.object == self) {
            if(self.textStorage.length != 0 || !self.textStorage.length) {
                [self setNeedsDisplay];
            }
        }
    }


    #pragma mark - Setters

    - (void)setPlaceholderText:(NSString *)placeholderText withFont:(UIFont *)font
    {
        self.placeholderText = placeholderText;
        self.placeholderTextFont = font;

    }



    - (void)drawRect:(CGRect)rect
    {
        [super drawRect:rect];
        [[UIColor lightGrayColor] setFill];

        if (self.textStorage.length != 0) {
            return;
        }

        CGRect inset = CGRectInset(rect, 8, 8);//Default rect insets for textView
        NSDictionary *attributes =  @{NSFontAttributeName: self.placeholderTextFont, NSForegroundColorAttributeName: [UIColor grayColor]};
        [self.placeholderText drawInRect:inset withAttributes:attributes];
    }`
  • FYI, before someone beats me to it... this is fairly direct to translate to Swift. Nothing complicated here. – TheCodingArt Aug 11 '15 at 21:33
3

I tried to make code convenient from clearlight's answer.

extension UITextView{

    func setPlaceholder() {

        let placeholderLabel = UILabel()
        placeholderLabel.text = "Enter some text..."
        placeholderLabel.font = UIFont.italicSystemFont(ofSize: (self.font?.pointSize)!)
        placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()
        placeholderLabel.tag = 222
        placeholderLabel.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: 5, y: (self.font?.pointSize)! / 2)
        placeholderLabel.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !self.text.isEmpty

        self.addSubview(placeholderLabel)
    }

    func checkPlaceholder() {
        let placeholderLabel = self.viewWithTag(222) as! UILabel
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !self.text.isEmpty
    }

}

usage

override func viewDidLoad() {
    textView.delegate = self
    textView.setPlaceholder()
}

func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
    textView.checkPlaceholder()
}
  • A couple of issues. (1) As an extension that assumes and 'borrows' a UIView tag property value, there is risk someone might use the same tag in their own view hierarchy, unaware of the extension's usage, creating an extremely difficult to diagnose bug. Things like that don't belong in library code or extensions. (2) It still requires the caller to declare a delegate. The Floating Placeholder avoids hacks, has a tiny footprint, is simple and entirely local, which makes it a safe bet. – clearlight Feb 28 '17 at 8:24
3

Swift 3.2

extension EditProfileVC:UITextViewDelegate{

    func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
        if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGray {
            textView.text = nil
            textView.textColor = UIColor.black
       }
    }
    func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
        if textView.text.isEmpty {
            textView.text = "Placeholder"
            textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        }
    }
}

First when user start editing textViewDidBeginEditing call and then check the if colour of text grey means user didn't write anything then set as textview nil and change the colour to black for user texting.

When user end editing textViewDidEndEditing is call and check if user doesn't write anything in textview then text set as grey colour with text "PlaceHolder"

  • Please add some explanation to your code – Aleks Andreev Dec 7 '17 at 7:40
  • check it, I was explaining code. – V D Purohit Dec 7 '17 at 7:55
3

Contrary to just about every answer on this post, UITextView does have a placeholder property. For reasons beyond my comprehension, it is only exposed in IB, as such:

<userDefinedRuntimeAttributes>
  <userDefinedRuntimeAttribute type="string" keyPath="placeholder" value="My Placeholder"/>
</userDefinedRuntimeAttributes>

So if you are using storyboards and a static placeholder will suffice, just set the property on the inspector.

You can also set this property in code like this:

textView.setValue("My Placeholder", forKeyPath: "placeholder")

Its cloudy as to weather this is accessed via private API, as the property is exposed.

I haven't tried submitting with this method. But I will be submitting this way shortly and will update this answer accordingly.

UPDATE:

I have shipped this code in multiple releases with no issues from Apple.

  • in Swift 5 you can write myTextView,placeholder = "enter your eye color" – user462990 Apr 19 at 10:44
  • @user462990 Can you provide a documentation link for this? I don't believe this is accurate. – Alex Chase Apr 24 at 20:09
  • sorry, didn't find dox but it's really easy to test... eg "alert.addTextField { (textField3) in textField3.placeholder = language.JBLocalize(phrase: "yourName") }. jbLocalize is a translation manager which returns a String – user462990 Apr 26 at 12:00
  • 1
    @user462990 You are referencing UITextField NOT UITextView please read the questions/responses more carefully. – Alex Chase May 1 at 0:22
  • @AlexChase Have you submitted your app and was it approved with the above solution. – George Jul 29 at 8:46
2

This is my ready to use solution if you are working with multiple text views

func textViewShouldBeginEditing(textView: UITextView) -> Bool {        
    // Set cursor to the beginning if placeholder is set
    if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGrayColor() {
        textView.selectedTextRange = textView.textRangeFromPosition(textView.beginningOfDocument, toPosition: textView.beginningOfDocument)
    }

    return true
}

func textView(textView: UITextView, shouldChangeTextInRange range: NSRange, replacementText text: String) -> Bool {
    // Remove placeholder
    if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGrayColor() && text.characters.count > 0 {
        textView.text = ""
        textView.textColor = UIColor.blackColor()
    }

    if text == "\n" {
        textView.resignFirstResponder()
        return false
    }

    return true
}

func textViewDidChange(textView: UITextView) {
    // Set placeholder if text is empty
    if textView.text.isEmpty {
        textView.text = NSLocalizedString("Hint", comment: "hint")
        textView.textColor = UIColor.lightGrayColor()
        textView.selectedTextRange = textView.textRangeFromPosition(textView.beginningOfDocument, toPosition: textView.beginningOfDocument)
    }
}

func textViewDidChangeSelection(textView: UITextView) {
    // Set cursor to the beginning if placeholder is set
    let firstPosition = textView.textRangeFromPosition(textView.beginningOfDocument, toPosition: textView.beginningOfDocument)

    // Do not change position recursively
    if textView.textColor == UIColor.lightGrayColor() && textView.selectedTextRange != firstPosition {
        textView.selectedTextRange = firstPosition
    }
}
  • It is very nice! – KevinVuD May 26 '18 at 11:03
2

Swift 3.1

This extension worked well for me: https://github.com/devxoul/UITextView-Placeholder

Here is a code snippet:

Install it via pod:

pod 'UITextView+Placeholder', '~> 1.2'

Import it to your class

import UITextView_Placeholder

And add placeholder property to your already created UITextView

textView.placeholder = "Put some detail"

Thats it... Here how it looks (Third box is a UITextView) enter image description here

2

Here is what I'm using for this job done.

@IBDesignable class UIPlaceholderTextView: UITextView {

    var placeholderLabel: UILabel?

    override init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
        super.init(frame: frame, textContainer: textContainer)
        sharedInit()
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
        sharedInit()
    }

    override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
        sharedInit()
    }

    func sharedInit() {
        refreshPlaceholder()
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(textChanged), name: .UITextViewTextDidChange, object: nil)
    }

    @IBInspectable var placeholder: String? {
        didSet {
            refreshPlaceholder()
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable var placeholderColor: UIColor? = .darkGray {
        didSet {
            refreshPlaceholder()
        }
    }

    @IBInspectable var placeholderFontSize: CGFloat = 14 {
        didSet {
            refreshPlaceholder()
        }
    }

    func refreshPlaceholder() {
        if placeholderLabel == nil {
            placeholderLabel = UILabel()
            let contentView = self.subviews.first ?? self

            contentView.addSubview(placeholderLabel!)
            placeholderLabel?.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false

            placeholderLabel?.leftAnchor.constraint(equalTo: contentView.leftAnchor, constant: textContainerInset.left + 4).isActive = true
            placeholderLabel?.rightAnchor.constraint(equalTo: contentView.rightAnchor, constant: textContainerInset.right + 4).isActive = true
            placeholderLabel?.topAnchor.constraint(equalTo: contentView.topAnchor, constant: textContainerInset.top).isActive = true
            placeholderLabel?.bottomAnchor.constraint(lessThanOrEqualTo: contentView.bottomAnchor, constant: textContainerInset.bottom)
        }
        placeholderLabel?.text = placeholder
        placeholderLabel?.textColor = placeholderColor
        placeholderLabel?.font = UIFont.systemFont(ofSize: placeholderFontSize)
    }

    @objc func textChanged() {
        if self.placeholder?.isEmpty ?? true {
            return
        }

        UIView.animate(withDuration: 0.25) {
            if self.text.isEmpty {
                self.placeholderLabel?.alpha = 1.0
            } else {
                self.placeholderLabel?.alpha = 0.0
            }
        }
    }

    override var text: String! {
        didSet {
            textChanged()
        }
    }

}

I know there're several approaches similar to this but the benefits from this one are:

  • Can set placeholder text, font size and color in IB.
  • No longer shows the warning of "Scroll View has ambiguous scrollable content" in IB.
  • Add animation to show/hide of placeholder.
2

Here is my way of solving this problem (Swift 4):

The idea was to make the simplest possible solution which allows to use placeholders of different colors, resizes to placeholders size, will not overwrite a delegate meanwhile keeping all UITextView functions work as expected.

import UIKit

class PlaceholderTextView: UITextView {
    var placeholderColor: UIColor = .lightGray
    var defaultTextColor: UIColor = .black

    private var isShowingPlaceholder = false {
        didSet {
            if isShowingPlaceholder {
                text = placeholder
                textColor = placeholderColor
            } else {
                textColor = defaultTextColor
            }
        }
    }

    var placeholder: String? {
        didSet {
            isShowingPlaceholder = !hasText
        }
    }

    @objc private func textViewDidBeginEditing(notification: Notification) {
        textColor = defaultTextColor
        if isShowingPlaceholder { text = nil }
    }

    @objc private func textViewDidEndEditing(notification: Notification) {
        isShowingPlaceholder = !hasText
    }

    // MARK: - Construction -
    override init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
        super.init(frame: frame, textContainer: textContainer)
        setup()
    }

    required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
        super.init(coder: aDecoder)
        setup()
    }

    private func setup() {
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(textViewDidBeginEditing(notification:)), name: UITextView.textDidBeginEditingNotification, object: nil)
        NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self, selector: #selector(textViewDidEndEditing(notification:)), name: UITextView.textDidEndEditingNotification, object: nil)
    }

    // MARK: - Destruction -
    deinit { NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self) }
}
  • This is a great and simple solution. – JaredH Apr 3 at 21:01
1

There is no such property in ios to add placeholder directly in TextView rather you can add a label and show/hide on the change in textView. SWIFT 2.0 and make sure to implement the textviewdelegate

func textViewDidChange(TextView: UITextView)
{

 if  txtShortDescription.text == ""
    {
        self.lblShortDescription.hidden = false
    }
    else
    {
        self.lblShortDescription.hidden = true
    }

}
1

Swift - I wrote a class that inherited UITextView and I added a UILabel as a subview to act as a placeholder.

  import UIKit
  @IBDesignable
  class HintedTextView: UITextView {

      @IBInspectable var hintText: String = "hintText" {
          didSet{
              hintLabel.text = hintText
          }
      }

      private lazy var hintLabel: UILabel = {
          let label = UILabel()
          label.font = UIFont.systemFontOfSize(16)
          label.textColor = UIColor.lightGrayColor()
          label.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
          return label
      }()


      override init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
          super.init(frame: frame, textContainer: textContainer)
          setupView()
      }

      required init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
         super.init(coder: aDecoder)
         setupView()
      }

      override func prepareForInterfaceBuilder() {
         super.prepareForInterfaceBuilder()
         setupView()
      }

      private func setupView() {

        translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
        delegate = self
        font = UIFont.systemFontOfSize(16)

        addSubview(hintLabel)

        NSLayoutConstraint.activateConstraints([

           hintLabel.leftAnchor.constraintEqualToAnchor(leftAnchor, constant: 4),
           hintLabel.rightAnchor.constraintEqualToAnchor(rightAnchor, constant: 8),
           hintLabel.topAnchor.constraintEqualToAnchor(topAnchor, constant: 4),
           hintLabel.heightAnchor.constraintEqualToConstant(30)
         ])
        }

      override func layoutSubviews() {
        super.layoutSubviews()
        setupView()
     }

}
  • Great example of using constraints to position the placeholder, however the ideal position of the placeholder is right above where the first character of the text is going to go, so calculating that position based on the the text view's font is better for that because it adapts to whatever size of font is set for the text view. – clearlight Dec 10 '16 at 0:02
1

I like @nerdist's solution. Based on that, I created an extension to UITextView:

import Foundation
import UIKit

extension UITextView
{
  private func add(_ placeholder: UILabel) {
    for view in self.subviews {
        if let lbl = view as? UILabel  {
            if lbl.text == placeholder.text {
                lbl.removeFromSuperview()
            }
        }
    }
    self.addSubview(placeholder)
  }

  func addPlaceholder(_ placeholder: UILabel?) {
    if let ph = placeholder {
      ph.numberOfLines = 0  // support for multiple lines
      ph.font = UIFont.italicSystemFont(ofSize: (self.font?.pointSize)!)
      ph.sizeToFit()
      self.add(ph)
      ph.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: 5, y: (self.font?.pointSize)! / 2)
      ph.textColor = UIColor(white: 0, alpha: 0.3)
      updateVisibility(ph)
    }
  }

  func updateVisibility(_ placeHolder: UILabel?) {
    if let ph = placeHolder {
      ph.isHidden = !self.text.isEmpty
    }
  }
}

In a ViewController class, for example, this is how I use it:

class MyViewController: UIViewController, UITextViewDelegate {
  private var notePlaceholder: UILabel!
  @IBOutlet weak var txtNote: UITextView!
  ...
  // UIViewController
  override func viewDidLoad() {
    notePlaceholder = UILabel()
    notePlaceholder.text = "title\nsubtitle\nmore..."
    txtNote.addPlaceholder(notePlaceholder)
    ...
  }

  // UITextViewDelegate
  func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
    txtNote.updateVisbility(notePlaceholder)
    ...
  }

Placeholder on UITextview!

enter image description here

UPDATE:

In case you change textview's text in code, remember to call updateVisibitly method to hide placeholder:

txtNote.text = "something in code"
txtNote.updateVisibility(self.notePlaceholder) // hide placeholder if text is not empty.

To prevent the placeholder being added more than once, a private add() function is added in extension.

  • Thanks again for your improvement to the original. I spent wayyy too much time on this this weekend, but I think you'll enjoy the EZ Placeholder extreme variant I eventually came up with: stackoverflow.com/a/41081244/2079103 (I gave you credit for contributing to the evolution of the placeholder solutions) – clearlight Dec 12 '16 at 17:16
1

In swift2.2:

public class CustomTextView: UITextView {

private struct Constants {
    static let defaultiOSPlaceholderColor = UIColor(red: 0.0, green: 0.0, blue: 0.0980392, alpha: 0.22)
}
private let placeholderLabel: UILabel = UILabel()

private var placeholderLabelConstraints = [NSLayoutConstraint]()

@IBInspectable public var placeholder: String = "" {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.text = placeholder
    }
}

@IBInspectable public var placeholderColor: UIColor = CustomTextView.Constants.defaultiOSPlaceholderColor {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.textColor = placeholderColor
    }
}

override public var font: UIFont! {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.font = font
    }
}

override public var textAlignment: NSTextAlignment {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.textAlignment = textAlignment
    }
}

override public var text: String! {
    didSet {
        textDidChange()
    }
}

override public var attributedText: NSAttributedString! {
    didSet {
        textDidChange()
    }
}

override public var textContainerInset: UIEdgeInsets {
    didSet {
        updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel()
    }
}

override public init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
    super.init(frame: frame, textContainer: textContainer)
    commonInit()
}

required public init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
    super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    commonInit()
}

private func commonInit() {
    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().addObserver(self,
                                                     selector: #selector(textDidChange),
                                                     name: UITextViewTextDidChangeNotification,
                                                     object: nil)

    placeholderLabel.font = font
    placeholderLabel.textColor = placeholderColor
    placeholderLabel.textAlignment = textAlignment
    placeholderLabel.text = placeholder
    placeholderLabel.numberOfLines = 0
    placeholderLabel.backgroundColor = UIColor.clearColor()
    placeholderLabel.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    addSubview(placeholderLabel)
    updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel()
}

private func updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel() {
    var newConstraints = NSLayoutConstraint.constraintsWithVisualFormat("H:|-(\(textContainerInset.left + textContainer.lineFragmentPadding))-[placeholder]",
                                                                        options: [],
                                                                        metrics: nil,
                                                                        views: ["placeholder": placeholderLabel])
    newConstraints += NSLayoutConstraint.constraintsWithVisualFormat("V:|-(\(textContainerInset.top))-[placeholder]",
                                                                     options: [],
                                                                     metrics: nil,
                                                                     views: ["placeholder": placeholderLabel])
    newConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(
        item: placeholderLabel,
        attribute: .Width,
        relatedBy: .Equal,
        toItem: self,
        attribute: .Width,
        multiplier: 1.0,
        constant: -(textContainerInset.left + textContainerInset.right + textContainer.lineFragmentPadding * 2.0)
        ))
    removeConstraints(placeholderLabelConstraints)
    addConstraints(newConstraints)
    placeholderLabelConstraints = newConstraints
}

@objc private func textDidChange() {
    placeholderLabel.hidden = !text.isEmpty
}

public override func layoutSubviews() {
    super.layoutSubviews()
    placeholderLabel.preferredMaxLayoutWidth = textContainer.size.width - textContainer.lineFragmentPadding * 2.0
}

deinit {
    NSNotificationCenter.defaultCenter().removeObserver(self,
                                                        name: UITextViewTextDidChangeNotification,
                                                        object: nil)
}

}

In swift3:

import UIKit

class CustomTextView: UITextView {

private struct Constants {
    static let defaultiOSPlaceholderColor = UIColor(red: 0.0, green: 0.0, blue: 0.0980392, alpha: 0.22)
}
private let placeholderLabel: UILabel = UILabel()

private var placeholderLabelConstraints = [NSLayoutConstraint]()

@IBInspectable public var placeholder: String = "" {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.text = placeholder
    }
}

@IBInspectable public var placeholderColor: UIColor = CustomTextView.Constants.defaultiOSPlaceholderColor {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.textColor = placeholderColor
    }
}

override public var font: UIFont! {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.font = font
    }
}

override public var textAlignment: NSTextAlignment {
    didSet {
        placeholderLabel.textAlignment = textAlignment
    }
}

override public var text: String! {
    didSet {
        textDidChange()
    }
}

override public var attributedText: NSAttributedString! {
    didSet {
        textDidChange()
    }
}

override public var textContainerInset: UIEdgeInsets {
    didSet {
        updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel()
    }
}

override public init(frame: CGRect, textContainer: NSTextContainer?) {
    super.init(frame: frame, textContainer: textContainer)
    commonInit()
}

required public init?(coder aDecoder: NSCoder) {
    super.init(coder: aDecoder)
    commonInit()
}

private func commonInit() {
    NotificationCenter.default.addObserver(self,
                                                     selector: #selector(textDidChange),
                                                     name: NSNotification.Name.UITextViewTextDidChange,
                                                     object: nil)

    placeholderLabel.font = font
    placeholderLabel.textColor = placeholderColor
    placeholderLabel.textAlignment = textAlignment
    placeholderLabel.text = placeholder
    placeholderLabel.numberOfLines = 0
    placeholderLabel.backgroundColor = UIColor.clear
    placeholderLabel.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    addSubview(placeholderLabel)
    updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel()
}

private func updateConstraintsForPlaceholderLabel() {
    var newConstraints = NSLayoutConstraint.constraints(withVisualFormat: "H:|-(\(textContainerInset.left + textContainer.lineFragmentPadding))-[placeholder]",
        options: [],
        metrics: nil,
        views: ["placeholder": placeholderLabel])
    newConstraints += NSLayoutConstraint.constraints(withVisualFormat: "V:|-(\(textContainerInset.top))-[placeholder]",
        options: [],
        metrics: nil,
        views: ["placeholder": placeholderLabel])
    newConstraints.append(NSLayoutConstraint(
        item: placeholderLabel,
        attribute: .width,
        relatedBy: .equal,
        toItem: self,
        attribute: .width,
        multiplier: 1.0,
        constant: -(textContainerInset.left + textContainerInset.right + textContainer.lineFragmentPadding * 2.0)
    ))
    removeConstraints(placeholderLabelConstraints)
    addConstraints(newConstraints)
    placeholderLabelConstraints = newConstraints
}

@objc private func textDidChange() {
    placeholderLabel.isHidden = !text.isEmpty
}

public override func layoutSubviews() {
    super.layoutSubviews()
    placeholderLabel.preferredMaxLayoutWidth = textContainer.size.width - textContainer.lineFragmentPadding * 2.0
}

deinit {
    NotificationCenter.default.removeObserver(self,
                                                        name: NSNotification.Name.UITextViewTextDidChange,
                                                        object: nil)
}

}

I wrote a class in swift. You need to import this class whenever required.

  • Please mention what version of Swift this is for (doesn't work for Swift 3) – clearlight Dec 30 '16 at 17:47
1

I can't add comment because of reputation. add one more delegate need in @clearlight answer.

func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) { 
        cell.placeholderLabel.isHidden = !textView.text.isEmpty
}

is need

because textViewDidChange is not called first time

1

no there is not any placeholder available for textview. you have to put label above it when user enter in textview then hide it or set by default value when user enters remove all values.

1

func setPlaceholder(){
var placeholderLabel = UILabel()
        placeholderLabel.text = "Describe your need..."
        placeholderLabel.font = UIFont.init(name: "Lato-Regular", size: 15.0) ?? UIFont.boldSystemFont(ofSize: 14.0)
        placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()
        descriptionTextView.addSubview(placeholderLabel)
        placeholderLabel.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: 5, y: (descriptionTextView.font?.pointSize)! / 2)
        placeholderLabel.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !descriptionTextView.text.isEmpty
}



//Delegate Method.

func textViewDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !textView.text.isEmpty
    }
	

1

I had to dispatch queue to get my placeholder text to reappear once editing was completed.

func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {

    if textView.text == "Description" {
        textView.text = nil
    }
}

func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {

    if textView.text.isEmpty {
        DispatchQueue.main.async {
            textView.text = "Description"
        }
    }
}
  • What do I type instead of last line ”textView.text = ”Description” if I want this value to be what user is typing ? – ISS Sep 6 '18 at 10:56
1

Our solution avoids mucking with the UITextView text and textColor properties, which is handy if you're maintaining a character counter.

It's simple:

1) Create a dummy UITextView in Storyboard with the same properties as the master UITextView. Assign placeholder text to the dummy text.

2) Align the top, left, and right edges of the two UITextViews.

3) Place the dummy behind the master.

4) Override the textViewDidChange(textView:) delegate function of the master, and show the dummy if the master has 0 characters. Otherwise, show the master.

This assumes both UITextViews have transparent backgrounds. If they do not, place the dummy on top when there are 0 characters, and push it underneath when there are > 0 characters. You will also have to swap responders to make sure the cursor follows the right UITextView.

0

Protocol version of clearlight's answer above, because protocols are great. Pop in it where ever you please. Dunk!

extension UITextViewPlaceholder where Self: UIViewController {

    // Use this in ViewController's ViewDidLoad method.
    func addPlaceholder(text: String, toTextView: UITextView, font: UIFont? = nil) {
        placeholderLabel = UILabel()
        placeholderLabel.text = text
        placeholderLabel.font = font ?? UIFont.italicSystemFont(ofSize: (toTextView.font?.pointSize)!)
        placeholderLabel.sizeToFit()
        toTextView.addSubview(placeholderLabel)
        placeholderLabel.frame.origin = CGPoint(x: 5, y: (toTextView.font?.pointSize)! / 2)
        placeholderLabel.textColor = UIColor.lightGray
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !toTextView.text.isEmpty
    }

    // Use this function in the ViewController's textViewDidChange delegate method.
    func textViewWithPlaceholderDidChange(_ textView: UITextView) {
        placeholderLabel.isHidden = !textView.text.isEmpty
    }
}
0

TEXT VIEW DELEGATE METHODS

Use these two delegate methods and also write UITextViewDelegate in your class

func textViewDidBeginEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
    if (commentsTextView.text == "Type Your Comments")
    {
        commentsTextView.text = nil
        commentsTextView.textColor = UIColor.darkGray
    }
}

func textViewDidEndEditing(_ textView: UITextView) {
    if commentsTextView.text.isEmpty
    {
        commentsTextView.text = "Type Your Comments"
        commentsTextView.textColor = UIColor.darkGray
    }
    textView.resignFirstResponder()
}

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