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This question already has an answer here:

It will awesome if I can apply a refer to a default implementation to the interface in the following program using super. Like Alpha.super.reset() so, plz tell us where this statement will be use.

interface Alpha {
  default void reset() {
    System.out.println("This is alpha version of default");
  }
}

interface Beta {
  default void reset() {
    System.out.println("This is beta version of default");
  }
}

class MyClass implements Alpha, Beta {
  void display() {
    System.out.println("This is not default");
  }
}

class MainClass {
  public static void main(String args[]) {
    MyClass ob = new MyClass();
    ob.reset();
    ob.display();
  }  
}

For example if we want to use the beta version of reset() method, then we have to extend one of them two interfaces. For example : interface Beta extends Alpha then it will use the beta version of reset(). But here we want to use the super and where it will be use.

marked as duplicate by Sotirios Delimanolis, August, Philipp Claßen, Radiodef, Elliott Frisch java Dec 29 '14 at 2:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Possibly you should use abstract class instead – user2575725 Dec 26 '14 at 4:22
  • 5
    Like Alpha.super.reset(); That's exactly the way you refer to it. – dasblinkenlight Dec 26 '14 at 4:22
  • 2
    @vikeng21 "default" was introduced in Java 8. That is why the interface contains code. – Philipp Claßen Dec 26 '14 at 4:23
  • 1
    You can in fact provide default implementation in Java 8. – August Dec 26 '14 at 4:23
  • 4
    @community downvoting without comments is conter-productive, we have a new user here – Alexander Malakhov Dec 26 '14 at 4:23
2

The syntax for calling the default method implementation that could be coming from two different interfaces uses the name of the interface followed by .super as follows:

class MyClass implements Alpha, Beta {
    public void reset() {
        Alpha.super.reset();
        Beta.super.reset();
    }
}

This implementation of the reset() method calls the default method implementations from both interfaces.

  • When i trying to apply the above code what you write in answer than i get error, that MyClass cannot implement reset .Plz edit your answer. – Manohar Kumar Dec 26 '14 at 4:39
  • @ManoharKumar That's because the method is supposed to be public. – dasblinkenlight Dec 26 '14 at 4:44
0

Compiling your code would produce an error:

java: class MyClass inherits unrelated defaults for reset() from types alpha and beta

because the compiler cannot select a declaration to use in this conflicting situation.

Here is an article for your reference.

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