11

I have had issues with spark-cassandra-connector (1.0.4, 1.1.0) when writing batches of 9 millions rows to a 12 nodes cassandra (2.1.2) cluster. I was writing with consistency ALL and reading with consistency ONE but the number of rows read was every time different from 9 million (8.865.753, 8.753.213 etc.).

I've checked the code of the connector and found no issues. Then, I decided to write my own application, independent from spark and the connector, to investigate the problem (the only dependency is datastax-driver-code version 2.1.3).

The full code, the startup scripts and the configuration files can now be found on github.

In pseudo-code, I wrote two different version of the application, the sync one:

try (Session session = cluster.connect()) {

    String cql = "insert into <<a table with 9 normal fields and 2 collections>>";
    PreparedStatement pstm = session.prepare(cql);

    for(String partitionKey : keySource) {
        // keySource is an Iterable<String> of partition keys

        BoundStatement bound = pstm.bind(partitionKey /*, << plus the other parameters >> */);
        bound.setConsistencyLevel(ConsistencyLevel.ALL);

        session.execute(bound);
    }

}

And the async one:

try (Session session = cluster.connect()) {

    List<ResultSetFuture> futures = new LinkedList<ResultSetFuture>();

    String cql = "insert into <<a table with 9 normal fields and 2 collections>>";
    PreparedStatement pstm = session.prepare(cql);

    for(String partitionKey : keySource) {
        // keySource is an Iterable<String> of partition keys

        while(futures.size()>=10 /* Max 10 concurrent writes */) {
            // Wait for the first issued write to terminate
            ResultSetFuture future = futures.get(0);
            future.get();
            futures.remove(0);
        }

        BoundStatement bound = pstm.bind(partitionKey /*, << plus the other parameters >> */);
        bound.setConsistencyLevel(ConsistencyLevel.ALL);

        futures.add(session.executeAsync(bound));
    }

    while(futures.size()>0) {
        // Wait for the other write requests to terminate
        ResultSetFuture future = futures.get(0);
        future.get();
        futures.remove(0);
    }
}

The last one is similar to that used by the connector in the case of no-batch configuration.

The two versions of the application work the same in all circumstances, except when the load is high.

For instance, when running the sync version with 5 threads on 9 machines (45 threads) writing 9 millions rows to the cluster, I find all the rows in the subsequent read (with spark-cassandra-connector).

If I run the async version with 1 thread per machine (9 threads), the execution is much faster but I cannot find all the rows in the subsequent read (the same problem that arised with the spark-cassandra-connector).

No exception was thrown by the code during the executions.

What could be the cause of the issue ?

I add some other results (thanks for the comments):

  • Async version with 9 threads on 9 machines, with 5 concurrent writers per thread (45 concurrent writers): no issues
  • Sync version with 90 threads on 9 machines (10 threads per JVM instance): no issues

Issues seemed start arising with Async writes and a number of concurrent writers > 45 and <=90, so I did other tests to ensure that the finding were right:

  • Replaced the "get" method of ResultSetFuture with "getUninterruptibly": same issues.
  • Async version with 18 threads on 9 machines, with 5 concurrent writers per thread (90 concurrent writers): no issues.

The last finding shows that the high number of concurrent writers (90) is not an issue as was expected in the first tests. The problem is the high number of async writes using the same session.

With 5 concurrent async writes on the same session the issue is not present. If I increase to 10 the number of concurrent writes, some operations get lost without notification.

It seems that the async writes are broken in Cassandra 2.1.2 (or the Cassandra Java driver) if you issue multiple (>5) writes concurrently on the same session.

  • Have you considered using a BATCH statement instead of sending each update separately? I know this doesn't address the issue you encounter, but it would seem like a better fit for doing batch inserts. – Onots Jan 5 '15 at 9:31
  • Yes, the issue is present also with batch statements. I didn't use batches because they are affected by another issue in spark cassandra connector that has been fixed in the very latest version of the connector. I have used a self compiled version of the connector with the fix and found the same problem. – Nicola Ferraro Jan 5 '15 at 10:17
  • I have added all the code and configuration files on github – Nicola Ferraro Jan 8 '15 at 0:05
7

Nicola and I communicated over email this weekend and thought I'd provide an update here with my current theory. I took a look at the github project Nicola shared and experimented with an 8 node cluster on EC2.

I was able to reproduce the issue with 2.1.2, but did observe that after a period of time I could re-execute the spark job and all 9 million rows were returned.

What I seemed to notice was that while nodes were under compaction I did not get all 9 million rows. On a whim I took a look at the change log for 2.1 and observed an issue CASSANDRA-8429 - "Some keys unreadable during compaction" that may explain this problem.

Seeing that the issue has been fixed at is targeted for 2.1.3, I reran the test against the cassandra-2.1 branch and ran the count job while compaction activity was happening and got 9 million rows back.

I'd like to experiment with this some more since my testing with the cassandra-2.1 branch was rather limited and the compaction activity may have been purely coincidental, but I'm hoping this may explain these issues.

| improve this answer | |
  • Didn't do tests with 2.1.3, but I can confirm that issues appears only with leveled compaction strategy, only when auto-compaction is in progress. With size tiered compaction or leveled with paused compaction, Cassandra works well. – Nicola Ferraro Jan 14 '15 at 22:37
6

A few possibilities:

  • Your async example is issuing 10 writes at time with 9 threads, so 90 at a time while your sync example is only doing 45 writes at a time, so I would try cutting the async down to the same rate so it's an apples to apples comparison.

    You don't say how you're checking for exceptions with the async approach. I see you are using future.get(), but it is recommended to use getUninterruptibly() as noted in the documentation:

    Waits for the query to return and return its result. This method is usually more convenient than Future.get() because it: Waits for the result uninterruptibly, and so doesn't throw InterruptedException. Returns meaningful exceptions, instead of having to deal with ExecutionException. As such, it is the preferred way to get the future result.

    So perhaps you're not seeing write exceptions that are occurring with your async example.

  • Another unlikely possibility is that your keySource is for some reason returning duplicate partition keys, so when you do the writes, some of them end up overwriting a previously inserted row and don't increase the row count. But that should impact the sync version too, so that's why I say it's unlikely.

    I would try writing smaller sets than 9 million and at a slow rate and see if the problem only starts to happen at a certain number of inserts or certain rate of inserts. If the number of inserts has an impact, then I'd suspect something is wrong with the row keys in the data. If the rate of inserts has an impact, then I'd suspect hot spots causing write timeout errors.

  • One other thing to check would be the Cassandra log file, to see if there are any exceptions being reported there.

Addendum: 12/30/14

I tried to reproduce the symptom using your sample code with Cassandra 2.1.2 and driver 2.1.3. I used a single table with a key of an incrementing number so that I could see gaps in the data. I did a lot of async inserts (30 at a time per thread in 10 threads all using one global session). Then I did a "select count (*)" of the table, and indeed it reported fewer rows in the table than expected. Then I did a "select *" and dumped the rows to a file and checked for missing keys. They seemed to be randomly distributed, but when I queried for those missing individual rows, it turned out they were actually present in the table. Then I noticed every time I did a "select count (*)", it came back with a different number, so it seems to be giving an approximation of the number of rows in the table rather than the actual number.

So I revised the test program to do a read back phase after all the writes, since I know all the key values. When I did that, all the async writes were present in the table.

So my question is, how are you checking the number of rows that are in your table after you finish writing? Are you querying for each individual key value or using some kind of operation like "select *"? If the latter, that seems to give most of the rows, but not all of them, so perhaps your data is actually present. Since no exceptions are being thrown, it seems to suggest that the writes are all successful. The other question would be, are you sure your key values are unique for all 9 million rows.

| improve this answer | |
  • I didn't use count(*) as it showed me wrong results from the beginning. I used two methods for counting the rows: 1) Spark-cassandra-connector that executes multiple queries in the token ring space and sum up the results; 2) Spark with hadoop mapreduce API. I noticed the same behaviour with the two methods. – Nicola Ferraro Jan 4 '15 at 10:42
  • I am also sure that the row id are different. I checked them multiple times and when I just change the parameter "Async" to "Sync" in the startup script it works, so the row ids are OK. I have experienced also the behaviour you are discribing about reading one row at time. The fact that the single row is found can be due to: 1) Read repair, if they are enabled in your cluster 2) Any time you read the row, it can be read from different nodes with respect to the count(*). Since you are writing with consistency ALL, this should not happen. – Nicola Ferraro Jan 4 '15 at 10:46
  • 1
    You might want to try setting a replication factor of 1 for your test and see if you can find rows that are actually missing after the async writes. Reading back the rows by the individual keys is the definitive test for determining if a row is missing or not, since these other methods appear to be under counting rather than the rows being missing. If you could post more of your code I could try to reproduce the symptom, but so far when I do a lot of async writes with one session, they are all present in the table. – Jim Meyer Jan 4 '15 at 13:19

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.