12

In this answer https://stackoverflow.com/a/27680814/3456281, the following construct is presented

a=[1,2]
while True:
    if IndexError:
        print ("Stopped.")
        break
    print(a[2])

which actually prints "Stopped." and breaks (tested with Python 3.4.1).

Why?! Why is if IndexError even legal? Why does a[2] not raise an IndexError with no try ... except around?

  • 1
    Well it was my answer and I didnt realize that its always True. – GLHF Dec 28 '14 at 22:33
  • This is truly interesting, I've never known about this – Crispy Dec 28 '14 at 22:33
  • 3
    I deleted the answer, Im getting downvotes because of it :-) – GLHF Dec 28 '14 at 22:43
  • @qqvc Wait... You were suggesting answers involving concepts that you didn't understand? Please don't do that. – SethMMorton Dec 28 '14 at 23:34
  • I didnt understand what? I understand that question clearly. – GLHF Dec 28 '14 at 23:36
28

All objects have a boolean value. If not otherwise defined, that boolean value is True.

So this code is simply the equivalent of doing if True; so execution reaches the break statement immediately and the print is never reached.

  • source for "if not otherwise defined, all objects are True"? – Jasper Dec 28 '14 at 22:34
  • 15
    @Jasper: docs.python.org/2/reference/datamodel.html#object.__nonzero__ says "If a class defines neither __len__() nor __nonzero__(), all its instances are considered true." – BrenBarn Dec 28 '14 at 22:39
  • 2
    @Jasper: and in Truth Value Testing: Any object can be tested for truth value, for use in an if or while condition or as operand of the Boolean operations below. The following values are considered false: [...] All other values are considered true — so objects of many types are always true. Exceptions are just more objects here. – Martijn Pieters Dec 28 '14 at 22:43
  • @MartijnPieters correct and I'd add that it's common practice to test the existence of an object by if object:, which means that it's normal behaviour for objects to returns True – Jivan Dec 29 '14 at 3:50
  • @MartijnPieters hum I just realised it's exactly what you said but in a more common-ground way. – Jivan Dec 29 '14 at 3:52
3

View the Python documentation, section Truth Value Testing under Built-in Types of The Python Standard Library. The first sentence, and the first sentence after the last bullet point answers your question.

Any object can be tested for truth value ...

and

All other values are considered true — so objects of many types are always true.

Here's the full text of the documentation, (content in brackets, [], are added as an augmentation):

5.1. Truth Value Testing

Any object can be tested for truth value, for use in an if or while condition or as operand of the Boolean operations below. The following values are considered false:

  • None

  • False

  • zero of any numeric type, for example, 0, 0L, 0.0, 0j.

  • any empty sequence, for example, '', (), [].

  • any empty mapping, for example, {}.

  • instances of user-defined classes, if the class defines a __bool__() [__nonzero__() in Python 2] or __len__() method, when that method returns the integer zero or bool value False. [See Data Model, Special Method Names, section Basic Customization, of The Python Language Reference]

All other values are considered true — so objects of many types are always true.

Operations and built-in functions that have a Boolean result always return 0 or False for false and 1 or True for true, unless otherwise stated. (Important exception: the Boolean operations or and and always return one of their operands.)

Conclusion

So since Exception does not have a __bool__, __nonzero__, or __len__, (nor fall under the other conditions listed above) an Exception object will always test as True in a boolean context.

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