42

I'm trying to catch the SIGUSR1 signal in a bash script that is sleeping via the sleep command:

#!/bin/bash

trap 'echo "Caught SIGUSR1"' SIGUSR1

echo "Sleeping.  Pid=$$"
while :
do
    sleep 10
    echo "Sleep over"
done

The signal trap works, but the message being echoed is not displayed until the sleep 10 has finished.
It appears the bash signal handling waits until the current command finished before processing the signal.

Is there a way to have it interrupt the running sleep command as soon as it gets the signal, the same way a C program would interrupt the libc sleep() function?

3 Answers 3

58
#!/bin/bash

trap 'echo "Caught SIGUSR1"' SIGUSR1

echo "Sleeping.  Pid=$$"
while :
do
   sleep 10 &
   wait $!
   echo "Sleep over"
done
4
  • 18
    Some relevant info
    – iruvar
    Dec 29, 2014 at 19:44
  • 2
    Replace 10 by infinity such as "sleep infinity &" Aug 19, 2015 at 16:06
  • 2
    @iruvar your link is worth it's weight in gold. not being able to interrupt a sleep from a different process very very very counter-intuitive. Aug 1, 2017 at 11:40
  • 4
    according to that link, when bash is interrupted, sleep 10 is not automatically killed, should add it to the trap ? Dec 10, 2017 at 12:36
16

Just a point about the wait after the sleep because I've just made this error in my script:

You should use wait $! instead of wait if, inside your script, you already launched other processes in background

For example, the wait inside the next snippet of code will wait for the termination of both process_1 and sleep 10:

process_1 &
  ...
sleep 10 &
wait  

If you use, instead of wait, wait $! your script will wait only for sleep 10, because $! means PID of last backgrounded process.

1
  • Thanks a lot! I changed my answer as suggested by you. Dec 11, 2017 at 16:53
6

Remark that

sleep infinity &
wait

puts the sleep in background, and stops the wait with the signal. This leaves an infinite sleep behind on every signal !

Replace the sleep and wait with

read

and you will be fine.

3
  • I don't think it does leave a background process hanging, at least not on MacOS 10.12.
    – frnhr
    Nov 25, 2016 at 15:01
  • read doesn't wait forever. User presses enter -> immediate return. Stdin is connected to /dev/null -> immediate return. Sep 25, 2020 at 21:39
  • read trick is interesting thanks. If you want to be sure to never read anything you may use: read -u 2 in bash which instructs read to get its input from a file description number 2 (which is stderr which obviously will never any input).
    – Sylvain
    Jun 14, 2021 at 5:58

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