17

I have a model with a unique_together defined for 3 fields to be unique together:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    clid = models.AutoField(primary_key=True, db_column='CLID')
    csid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CSID')
    cid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CID')
    uuid = models.CharField(max_length=96, db_column='UUID', blank=True)

    class Meta(models.Meta):
        unique_together = [
            ["csid", "cid", "uuid"],
        ]

Now, if I attempt to save a MyModel instance with an existing csid+cid+uuid combination, I would get:

IntegrityError: (1062, "Duplicate entry '1-1-1' for key 'CSID'")

Which is correct. But, is there a way to customize that key name? (CSID in this case)

In other words, can I provide a name for a constraint listed in unique_together?

As far as I understand, this is not covered in the documentation.

  • Just curious as to what the use case is for changing the index names? I don't see how it matters, other than for aesthetics, unless you are dealing with the database directly. – user193130 Jan 4 '15 at 21:10
  • 1
    @user193130 it is a good point. I have a rather strange Django use case where I have a legacy mysql database without any foreign key relationships and throughout the application I'm operating with the database mostly through raw queries (which is killing me, btw, don't ask). In tests though, I'm using django ORM with models.py being as close to the real legacy database as possible. Here I want the unique key constraint to be named as in the real database. Hope you understand all the weirdness I'm into currently :) – alecxe Jan 4 '15 at 21:15
  • 3
    Ah yes that actually makes a lot of sense. Sounds like a lot of woe dealing with the legacy db but I'm assuming you're making models.py as close to the real db as possible in preparation to use it not just for tests but for the real application code so you don't have to deal with raw queries anymore. Hope that goes well for you – user193130 Jan 6 '15 at 3:29
  • Guess all the answers for changing the error message won't work for you lol – user193130 Jan 6 '15 at 3:36
  • 1
    @danihp please undelete it - you took time and made a great effort researching the subject. Don't worry about the bounty - I'm pretty sure there is an another one coming :) – alecxe Jan 9 '15 at 21:51
5
+300

Changing index name in ./manage.py sqlall output.

You could run ./manage.py sqlall yourself and add in the constraint name yourself and apply manually instead of syncdb.

$ ./manage.py sqlall test
BEGIN;
CREATE TABLE `test_mymodel` (
    `CLID` integer AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    `CSID` integer NOT NULL,
    `CID` integer NOT NULL,
    `UUID` varchar(96) NOT NULL,
    UNIQUE (`CSID`, `CID`, `UUID`)
)
;

COMMIT;

e.g.

$ ./manage.py sqlall test
BEGIN;
CREATE TABLE `test_mymodel` (
    `CLID` integer AUTO_INCREMENT NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
    `CSID` integer NOT NULL,
    `CID` integer NOT NULL,
    `UUID` varchar(96) NOT NULL,
    UNIQUE constraint_name (`CSID`, `CID`, `UUID`)
)
;

COMMIT;

Overriding BaseDatabaseSchemaEditor._create_index_name

The solution pointed out by @danihp is incomplete, it only works for field updates (BaseDatabaseSchemaEditor._alter_field)

The sql I get by overriding _create_index_name is:

BEGIN;
CREATE TABLE "testapp_mymodel" (
    "CLID" integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
    "CSID" integer NOT NULL,
    "CID" integer NOT NULL,
    "UUID" varchar(96) NOT NULL,
    UNIQUE ("CSID", "CID", "UUID")
)
;

COMMIT;

Overriding BaseDatabaseSchemaEditor.create_model

based on https://github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/db/backends/schema.py

class BaseDatabaseSchemaEditor(object):
    # Overrideable SQL templates
    sql_create_table_unique = "UNIQUE (%(columns)s)"
    sql_create_unique = "ALTER TABLE %(table)s ADD CONSTRAINT %(name)s UNIQUE (%(columns)s)"
    sql_delete_unique = "ALTER TABLE %(table)s DROP CONSTRAINT %(name)s"

and this is the piece in create_model that is of interest:

    # Add any unique_togethers
    for fields in model._meta.unique_together:
        columns = [model._meta.get_field_by_name(field)[0].column for field in fields]
        column_sqls.append(self.sql_create_table_unique % {
            "columns": ", ".join(self.quote_name(column) for column in columns),
        })

Conclusion

You could:

  • override create_model to use _create_index_name for unique_together contraints.
  • modify sql_create_table_unique template to include a name parameter.

You may also be able to check a possible fix on this ticket:

https://code.djangoproject.com/ticket/24102

7

Its not well documented, but depending on if you are using Django 1.6 or 1.7 there are two ways you can do this:

In Django 1.6 you can override the unique_error_message, like so:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    clid = models.AutoField(primary_key=True, db_column='CLID')
    csid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CSID')
    cid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CID')

    # ....

def unique_error_message(self, model_class, unique_check):
    if model_class == type(self) and unique_check == ("csid", "cid", "uuid"):
        return _('Your custom error')
    else:
        return super(MyModel, self).unique_error_message(model_class, unique_check)

Or in Django 1.7:

class MyModel(models.Model):
    clid = models.AutoField(primary_key=True, db_column='CLID')
    csid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CSID')
    cid = models.IntegerField(db_column='CID')
    uuid = models.CharField(max_length=96, db_column='UUID', blank=True)

    class Meta(models.Meta):
        unique_together = [
            ["csid", "cid", "uuid"],
        ]
        error_messages = {
            NON_FIELD_ERRORS: {
                'unique_together': "%(model_name)s's %(field_labels)s are not unique.",
            }
        }
  • Interesting approach, set the error message instead of setting the constraint name! Thank you! – alecxe Jan 5 '15 at 7:05
  • I like that this solution doesn't muck about with SQL. It's a straight-forward python-esque approach. – Árni St. Sigurðsson Jan 19 '15 at 10:26
5
+150

Integrity error is raised from database but from django:

create table t ( a int, b int , c int);
alter table t add constraint u unique ( a,b,c);   <-- 'u'    
insert into t values ( 1,2,3);
insert into t values ( 1,2,3);

Duplicate entry '1-2-3' for key 'u'   <---- 'u'

That means that you need to create constraint with desired name in database. But is django in migrations who names constraint. Look into _create_unique_sql :

def _create_unique_sql(self, model, columns):
    return self.sql_create_unique % {
        "table": self.quote_name(model._meta.db_table),
        "name": self.quote_name(self._create_index_name(model, columns, suffix="_uniq")),
        "columns": ", ".join(self.quote_name(column) for column in columns),
    }

Is _create_index_name who has the algorithm to names constraints:

def _create_index_name(self, model, column_names, suffix=""):
    """
    Generates a unique name for an index/unique constraint.
    """
    # If there is just one column in the index, use a default algorithm from Django
    if len(column_names) == 1 and not suffix:
        return truncate_name(
            '%s_%s' % (model._meta.db_table, self._digest(column_names[0])),
            self.connection.ops.max_name_length()
        )
    # Else generate the name for the index using a different algorithm
    table_name = model._meta.db_table.replace('"', '').replace('.', '_')
    index_unique_name = '_%x' % abs(hash((table_name, ','.join(column_names))))
    max_length = self.connection.ops.max_name_length() or 200
    # If the index name is too long, truncate it
    index_name = ('%s_%s%s%s' % (
        table_name, column_names[0], index_unique_name, suffix,
    )).replace('"', '').replace('.', '_')
    if len(index_name) > max_length:
        part = ('_%s%s%s' % (column_names[0], index_unique_name, suffix))
        index_name = '%s%s' % (table_name[:(max_length - len(part))], part)
    # It shouldn't start with an underscore (Oracle hates this)
    if index_name[0] == "_":
        index_name = index_name[1:]
    # If it's STILL too long, just hash it down
    if len(index_name) > max_length:
        index_name = hashlib.md5(force_bytes(index_name)).hexdigest()[:max_length]
    # It can't start with a number on Oracle, so prepend D if we need to
    if index_name[0].isdigit():
        index_name = "D%s" % index_name[:-1]
    return index_name

For the current django version (1.7) the constraint name for a composite unique constraint looks like:

>>> _create_index_name( 'people', [ 'c1', 'c2', 'c3'], '_uniq' )
'myapp_people_c1_d22a1efbe4793fd_uniq'

You should overwrite _create_index_name in some way to change algorithm. A way, maybe, writing your own db backend inhering from mysql and overwriting _create_index_name in your DatabaseSchemaEditor on your schema.py (not tested)

  • This is much closer to what I was expecting to get as an answer. I'll give it a try and come back to you. Thank you! – alecxe Jan 4 '15 at 19:17
  • may only for for field updates, _create_index_name is not used for unique_together in create_model. – dnozay Jan 8 '15 at 17:21
  • Thanks to @dnozay, we have a real solution (+django ticket) to the problem. Though, I had to say that we are still on django 1.6.9 (stuck with python2.6 for now). That means that it is much more difficult to customize the unique constraint name (source). Anyway, great answer. Thank you! – alecxe Jan 9 '15 at 6:44
2

I believe you have to do that in your Database;

MySQL:

ALTER TABLE `votes` ADD UNIQUE `unique_index`(`user`, `email`, `address`);

I believe would then say ... for key 'unique_index'

  • Thanks for the participation. This is an option. – alecxe Jan 3 '15 at 1:53
2

One solution is you can catch the IntegrityError at save(), and then make custom error message as you want as below.

try:
    obj = MyModel()
    obj.csid=1
    obj.cid=1
    obj.uuid=1
    obj.save()

except IntegrityError:
    message = "IntegrityError: Duplicate entry '1-1-1' for key 'CSID', 'cid', 'uuid' "

Now you can use this message to display as error message.

  • This is definitely a workaround, but thanks for that anyway. – alecxe Jan 3 '15 at 1:53

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