3

I want to remove all non letter characters from a string. When I say all letters I mean anything that isn't in the alphabet, or an apostrophe. This is the code I have.

public static string RemoveBadChars(string word)
{
    char[] chars = new char[word.Length];
    for (int i = 0; i < word.Length; i++)
    {
        char c = word[i];

        if ((int)c >= 65 && (int)c <= 90)
        {
            chars[i] = c;
        }
        else if ((int)c >= 97 && (int)c <= 122)
        {
            chars[i] = c;
        }
        else if ((int)c == 44)
        {
            chars[i] = c;
        }
    }

    word = new string(chars);

    return word;
}

It's close, but doesn't quite work. The problem is this:

[in]: "(the"
[out]: " the"

It gives me a space there instead of the "(". I want to remove the character entirely.

  • Very similar to: stackoverflow.com/questions/3210393/… – Mephy Dec 30 '14 at 2:38
  • you have space(null character) because the element in chars[] is zero if it is bad char. I think you need to shrink the string based on how many bad chars you have – V-SHY Dec 30 '14 at 2:45
2

A regular expression would be better as this is pretty inefficient, but to answer your question, the problem with your code is that you should use a different variable other than i inside your for loop. So, something like this:

public static string RemoveBadChars(string word)
{
    char[] chars = new char[word.Length];
    int myindex=0;
    for (int i = 0; i < word.Length; i++)
    {
        char c = word[i];

        if ((int)c >= 65 && (int)c <= 90)
        {
            chars[myindex] = c;
            myindex++;
        }
        else if ((int)c >= 97 && (int)c <= 122)
        {
            chars[myindex] = c;
            myindex++;
        }
        else if ((int)c == 44)
        {
            chars[myindex] = c;
            myindex++;
        }
    }

    word = new string(chars);

    return word;
}
  • Thanks, I know that I could use Regex, but I was trying to do it without it, plus I don't understand Regex at all. – jack3604 Dec 30 '14 at 2:52
6

The Char class has a method that could help out. Use Char.IsLetter() to detect valid letters (and an additional check for the apostrophe), then pass the result to the string constructor:

var input = "(the;':";

var result = new string(input.Where(c => Char.IsLetter(c) || c == '\'').ToArray());

Output:

the'

  • 2
    much more beautiful, well done! – Fattie Mar 28 '16 at 16:29
3

You should use Regular Expression (Regex) instead.

public static string RemoveBadChars(string word)
{
    Regex reg = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z']");
    return reg.Replace(word, string.Empty);
}

If you don't want to replace spaces:

Regex reg = new Regex("[^a-zA-Z' ]");
  • I've seen this before, but to be honest, I have no idea how that works and that's kind of why I avoided it. What does "[^a-zA-Z]" mean? To me it looks like senseless numbers, but the mean something and I can't figure it out. – jack3604 Dec 30 '14 at 2:46
  • how about apostrophe? – V-SHY Dec 30 '14 at 2:47
  • If you click on the link in my answer, you can see explanation to all the regular expression operators. @V-SHY Opps, didn't read his question carefully enough, changed my answer. – Dan Dec 30 '14 at 2:50
1
private static Regex badChars = new Regex("[^A-Za-z']");

public static string RemoveBadChars(string word)
{
    return badChars.Replace(word, "");
}

This creates a Regular Expression that consists of a character class (enclosed in square brackets) that looks for anything that is not (the leading ^ inside the character class) A-Z, a-z, or '. It then defines a function that replaces anything that matches the expression with an empty string.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.