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the constructor is receiving two parameters.

a) a function whose type is a function receiving an inout params (so it can change the params)

b) passing your params object, expecting the function passed will be able to modify the object

then trigger the apply method, so your passed function can change the passed params.

If there's a solution with passing params in a closure, that'd work too.

class Test {

    var params: Any?

    var myFunc: (inout params: Any?) -> () = { (inout params: Any?) in return } //default value


    //constructor receving a function and a address to inout params object
    init(myFunc: (inout params: Any?) -> (), inout params: Any?) {
        self.myFunc = myFunc
        self.params = params
    }

    //call the passed function (extern) and pass the address of given params
    func apply() {
        self.myFunc(params: &self.params)
    }
}

func extern(inout params: Any?) {
    var a = params as [String: Int]
    a["factor"] = 11
}

var p: Any = ["factor": 10]
var test = Test(myFunc: extern, params: &p)

test.apply() //p["factor"] should be 11 now here

p["factor"] as [String: Int]

My second attempt using closures

//Utility

class Test {

    var closure: () -> Any

    var myFunc: (message: String, closure: () -> Any) -> () = { (message: String, closure: () -> Any) in return }

    init(myFunc: (message: String, closure: () -> Any) -> (), closure: () -> Any) {
        self.myFunc = myFunc
        self.closure = closure
    }

    func apply(message: String) {
        self.myFunc(message: message, closure: self.closure)
    }

}

//users of the utility

func extern(message: String, closure: () -> Any) {
    println(message)
    var name = closure() as [String: String]
    name["name"] = "Doe"
}

var name: Any = ["name": "John"]

var test = Test(myFunc: extern, closure: {name})
test.apply("hello ")
name //it's still John here

3rd attempt using AnyObject and closures and of course it works but still need your opinion guys for a best strategy.

//Utility

class Test {

    var closure: () -> AnyObject

    var myFunc: (message: String, closure: () -> AnyObject) -> () = { (message: String, closure: () -> AnyObject) in return }

    init(myFunc: (message: String, closure: () -> AnyObject) -> (), closure: () -> AnyObject) {
        self.myFunc = myFunc
        self.closure = closure
    }

    func apply(message: String) {
        self.myFunc(message: message, closure: self.closure)
    }

}

//users of the utility

func extern(message: String, closure: () -> AnyObject) {
    println(message)
    var name: Name = closure() as Name
    name.name = "Doe"
}

class Name {
    var name = "John"
}

var name = Name()

var test = Test(myFunc: extern, closure: {name})
test.apply("hello ")
name //it's changed here
  • Can you give more detail about what you're trying to do? params will only be inout in the context of the initializer -- trying to save it via self.params = params doesn't retain a reference if params is a value type. – Nate Cook Dec 30 '14 at 3:49
  • behind the scenes it's a Filter pattern, you pass your own filter function that gets registered as a listener, later when the utility calls the listener it passes your param object to the filter function, and from there filter function can decide whether to proceed or not, it can also change the param value, that's the concept – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 3:51
  • I understand that beyond the initializer the address of the param is not visible, so what else can we do, any strategy with using closures, or should I just restrict myself to use AnyObject only which is always passed by reference – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 3:55
1

It seems like you're trying to reinvent closures here. One point of closures is that they can capture references to the values around them. This should do what you're describing above, and lets you keep using proper types for your variables, rather than falling back on Any:

class Test {
    var myFunc: () -> Void = { }

    init(myFunc: () -> Void) {
        self.myFunc = myFunc
    }

    func apply() {
        self.myFunc()
    }
}

func extern(inout dict: [String: Int]) {
    dict["factor"] = 11
}

var p = ["factor": 10]

let test = Test {
    extern(&p)
}

test.apply() // p["factor"] is now 11 here

println(p)
// ["factor": 11]
  • we can't instantiate Test around P. Test is a utility already instantiated, while p (param) and filter func are from users of the utility, can we somehow create a closure around p (param) and pass to utility with our function and expect function to change the param, or any other strategy please – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 4:39
  • I've posted another attempt of mine, hopefully that will shed more light – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 4:50
  • my 3rd attempt using AnyObject and of course it worked but I'm restricted to using classes, but any strategy better than this, hopefully it sheds more light – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 4:59
  • sorry didn't get you, let's say Test is an API, and users of the API are passing function and a parameter (structure, dictionary, class etc.) both are separate pieces of code (can't mix) and i need to figure out best api/way to have this functionality. – user2727195 Dec 30 '14 at 6:26
  • 1
    If you're passing an instance of a class, that's right, you don't need to use inout to modify its properties. – Nate Cook Dec 30 '14 at 7:45

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