0

I would like to use HTML+CSS to typeset something similar to an inline fraction, like:

baseline ok

I can accomplish it with the following HTML/CSS:

.vstack {
    display: inline-block;
    position: relative;
}
.vstack > div {
  position: relative;
  height: 0;
}
before<span class="vstack">
  <div style="top: -.5em;">high</div>
  <div style="top: .5em;">low</div>
</span>after

In Internet Explorer, however, it looks like this:

baseline high

or

baseline low

depending on which div is placed last (so far I have only seen it in IE).

Inspired by the KaTeX project, which uses a similar approach to typeset fractions, this baseline issue can be fixed by introducing an extra span element:

.vstack {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
}
.vstack > div {
  position: relative;
  height: 0;
}
.baseline-fix {
  display: inline-table;
  table-layout: fixed;
}
before<span class="vstack">
  <div style="top: -.5em;">high</div>
  <div style="top: .5em;">low</div>
  <span class="baseline-fix"></span>
</span>after

(This is what KaTeX does, but table-layout: fixed does not seem to be necessary.)

My questions:

  1. Are browsers free to interpret the spec in this regard or is IE going against it?
  2. Why does it work?

2 Answers 2

0

I believe this is due to position calculation / interpretation varying between the two browsers rendering engines.

Not a direct answer- but you should be able to accomplish the same (depending on required support) with less HTML and CSS using pseudo elements, e.g:

.fraction {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
}
.fraction:before {
  content: attr(data-top);
  position: relative;
  top: -.5em;
}
.fraction:after {
  content: attr(data-bottom);
  position: absolute;
  bottom: -.5em;
  left: 0;
}
before <span class="fraction" data-top="high" data-bottom="low"></span>
after

Or alternatively...

.fraction {
  position: relative;
}
.top {
  top: -.5em;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0;
}
.bottom {
  top: .5em;
  position: relative;
}
before
<span class="fraction">
<span class="top">high</span>
<span class="bottom">low</span>
</span>after

4
  • Interesting approach. This only allows text (no HTML) in the "numerator" and "denominator" though, right?
    – janmr
    Dec 30, 2014 at 8:47
  • Yes- you cannot use HTML (e.g. elements etc), however you can use any (i.e. unicode) character as long as it is escaped correctly
    – SW4
    Dec 30, 2014 at 8:48
  • @JanMarthedalRasmussen - alternative which allows for any content: jsfiddle.net/emo8vh86/4
    – SW4
    Dec 30, 2014 at 8:52
  • Except the horizontal extent seems to be determined by the 'low' element. If I replace 'high' by a longer string, it overflows into the 'after' element.
    – janmr
    Dec 30, 2014 at 8:59
0

To answer the question, IE is interpreting your example differently and basing the baseline for the word "after" on the word preceding it, "High". The "baseline fix" (hack) brings the baseline back to the middle.

A different method

I have done this slightly differently.

Tested in IE 6 - 11 and Chrome

(IE seems to render a smaller font-size for sub and sup, if this is a problem, you can replace them with spans)

The trick is to:

  • use a larger line height for the parent to control the vertical spacing between "High" and "Low". In this example, line-height: 2em

  • wrap "high" and "low" in <sub> and <sup> and make them display: block so they appear over each other. ("High" and "Low" can also be wrapped in a span or div)

  • wrap both high and low in a span with display: inline-block and vertical-align: middle to bring the words around it in line with its middle.

Screenshot

Example

sub,
sup {
  display: block;
  font-size: 1em;
}
p {
  line-height: 2em;
}
p span {
  display: inline-block;
  vertical-align: middle;
}
<p class="highLow">Before<span><sup>High</sup><sub>Low</sub></span>After</p>

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