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I'm rewriting an application that involves dealing with objects in order of 10 millions using Java 8 and I noticed that streams can slow down the application up to 25%. Interestingly, this happens when my collections are empty as well, so it's the constant initialization time of stream. To reproduce the problem, consider the following code:

    long start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
        Set<String> set = Collections.emptySet();
        set.stream().forEach(s -> System.out.println(s));
    }
    long end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println((end - start)/1000_000);

    start = System.nanoTime();
    for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
        Set<String> set = Collections.emptySet();
        for (String s : set) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
    end = System.nanoTime();
    System.out.println((end - start)/1000_000);

The result is as follows: 224 vs. 5 ms.

If I use forEach on set directly, i.e., set.forEach(), the result will be: 12 vs 5ms.

Finally, if I create the closure outside once as

Consumer<? super String> consumer = s -> System.out.println(s);

and use set.forEach(c) the result will be 7 vs 5 ms.

Of course, the nubmers are small and my benchmarking is very primitive, but does this example shows that there is an overhead in initializing streams and closures?

(Actually, since set is empty, the initialization cost of closures should not be important in this case, but nevertheless, should I consider creating closures before hand instead of on-the-fly)

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    I had this issue too and made me so upset and let down. make a one million entry shuffel them and try to find first one with regular for loop and with findfirst with java 8 and try to time them you see if you use the old method it is much much fast specially you put break key word in your if statement – Kick Buttowski Dec 31 '14 at 2:15
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    Clojure != closure, and a Consumer is not a closure. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Closure_%28computer_programming%29 – Dici Dec 31 '14 at 2:16
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    Post discussing Lambdas vs Anon Classes with a valid performance benchmark – Edward J Beckett Dec 31 '14 at 2:23
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    There's definitely some startup overhead. But in many cases, streams are faster than the corresponding for loop, once the startup overhead is paid. So you should do some testing with actual data. (Also, your measurement methodology is completely busted, so you're getting mostly useless numbers.) The short answer is "yes, there's some" -- but if you want to really know, try updating your app and measuring its performance with real data. – Brian Goetz Dec 31 '14 at 4:17
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    Look at Sergey Kukcenko's talk from JVM Language Summit in 2013 for an example (with rigorous measurement.) Pretty much any "well-behaved" stream pipeline (e.g., filter-map-reduce) whose source is a Collection will outperform the corresponding for-loop because of the much faster element-access path once you have enough data to overcome the startup difference; the coefficient for the O(n) term is less with streams than with iterators. Eventually that dominates. – Brian Goetz Dec 31 '14 at 4:39
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The cost you see here is not associated with the "closures" at all but with the cost of Stream initialization.

Let's take your three sample codes:

for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
    Set<String> set = Collections.emptySet();
    set.stream().forEach(s -> System.out.println(s));
}

This one creates a new Stream instance at each loop; at least for the first 10k iterations, see below. After those 10k iterations, well, the JIT is probably smart enough to see that it's a no-op anyway.

for (int i = 0; i < 10_000_000; i++) {
    Set<String> set = Collections.emptySet();
    for (String s : set) {
        System.out.println(s);
    }
}

Here the JIT kicks in again: empty set? Well, that's a no-op, end of story.

set.forEach(System.out::println);

An Iterator is created for the set, which is always empty? Same story, the JIT kicks in.

The problem with your code to start with is that you fail to account for the JIT; for realistic measurements, run at least 10k loops before measuring, since 10k executions is what the JIT requires to kick in (at least, HotSpot acts this way).


Now, lambdas: they are call sites, and they are linked only once; but the cost of the initial linkage is still there, of course, and in your loops, you include this cost. Try and run only one loop before doing your measurements so that this cost is out of the way.

All in all, this is not a valid microbenchmark. Use caliper, or jmh, to really measure the performance.

An excellent video to see how lambdas work here. It is a little old now, and the JVM is much better than it was at this time with lambdas.

If you want to know more, look for literature about invokedynamic.

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    Good reference to invokedynamic and JIT. You have any other good JIT reference docs for optimization noobs? – Edward J Beckett Dec 31 '14 at 3:07
  • Thanks! I should read about it though and watch the video but before that a quick question: I just didn't get one point when you say: "but the cost of the initial linkage is still there, of course, and in your loops, you include this cost." Doesn't the Java compiler translate the lambda before running, or something happens at runtime? Is this wha invokedynamic is for? – Wickoo Dec 31 '14 at 3:11
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    @Ali "Doesn't the Java compiler translate the lambda before running, or something happens at runtime? Is this wha invokedynamic is for?" Yes, this is what invokedynamic is for. The generated call site has what is called a bootstrap method, and invokedynamic asks this bootstrap method for what code it should link. In theory, a bootstrap method may be queried again if, for instance, the type or even number of arguments change, but in Java this is never the case. This is the case in dynamic languages implemented on the JVM such as Jython and JRuby, for instance. – fge Dec 31 '14 at 3:20
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    @Ali and once the code is linked, the JIT can optimize it to its heart's content, which is another great feature; and which is why, for instance, JRuby performs better than the native Ruby implementation -- by far! – fge Dec 31 '14 at 3:22
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    @EddieB this video may be of interest; as to how it works internally, I have no idea ;) It requires a CS specialist to understand. But this video explains inlining, lock coarsening, loop unrolling, escape analysis etc in a very understandable way. – fge Dec 31 '14 at 3:31

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