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I want to setup schema.org metadata using json ld. for example following link uses ghost and it has "application/ld+json" meta data. http://blog.ghost.org/distributed-team-tools/

I want to achieve similar for my rails app. How should I implement it. is there some gem for doing this etc.

Thanks!

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11

There is a JSON-LD gem (http://rubygems.org/gems/json-ld), but it might not be specifically what you're looking for. Note that the point of JSON-LD is that it's just JSON, in this case using the schema.org context to interpret the values. Assuming that your data is in ActiveRecord models, you'll need a way to make sure that the record properties correspond to the appropriate schema.org properties. If this were the case, then just serializing your model to JSON (#to_json) gets you most of the way there. What remains is to add the @context, @id, and @type fields to the JSON.

For example, say you have a User model which serialized to something like the following:

{
  "name": "Harry",
  "email": "Harry@example.org"
}

As both "name" and "email" properties of http://schema.org/Person, you could get partway there by simply adding a @context and @type as follows:

{
  "@context": "http://schema.org/",
  "@type": "Person",
  "name": "Harry",
  "email": "Harry@example.org"
}

Presuming that you're building a RESTful app, it's good practice to give every object an @id, which corresponds to the resource URL for this person. This could be like the following:

{
  "@context": "http://schema.org/",
  "@id": "http://example.com/people/harry",
  "@type": "Person",
  "name": "Harry",
  "email": "Harry@example.org"
}

Now, if you retrieve http://example.com/people/harry as JSON (or JSON-LD), you could get back that representation.

The other thing about JSON-LD is that it's for "Linked Data", so including references to other resources is useful for allowing them to be found, much as you probably do within your HTML. The schema.org documentation includes numerous examples for how to generate different types of markup, including JSON-LD, for most all of the types they define. See http://schema.org/Person for one example, or http://schema.org/docs/full.html for their complete type hierarchy.

The JSON-LD gem comes in handy when you want to generate this data from other sources (typically some RDF format), or interpret data you've received. You can experiment with this at http://json-ld.org/playground.

You can also include your JSON-LD in HTML using a script tag with type="application/ld+json" as your example does. If you want to see how your data looks, you can test it either on Google structured-data testing tool, or on http://linter.structured-data.org/

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  • I'm creating a blogging app and it'd be great to use json-ld for metadata. Can you give pointers about how should I implement it. Can I use partials and then embed this json partial in html or there is some different approach which I should use. Thanks! – lightsaber Jan 1 '15 at 15:01
  • I'm using partial and jbuilder template. Solved it. Thanks! – lightsaber Jan 3 '15 at 6:41
  • 2
    > I'm using partial and jbuilder template. Like how? – Marvin Danig Oct 5 '17 at 2:32
1
%script{type: "application/ld+json"}
 :plain
  {
    "@context": "http://schema.org",        
    "headline": "Headline",       
    "@type": "Article",
    "alternativeHeadline": "Alternative Headline}"
  }

Instead of using :javascript filter, http://haml.info/docs/yardoc/file.REFERENCE.html#filters, instead I have used the %script tag which allows me to define its type by using the attribute method that defines the type as application/ld+json, http://haml.info/docs/yardoc/file.REFERENCE.html#attribute-methods

The :plain filter, it does not parse the filtered text. This is useful for large blocks of text without HTML tags, when you don’t want lines starting with . or - to be parsed, see doc http://haml.info/docs/yardoc/file.REFERENCE.html#plain-filter

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