78

While coding in C, I came across the below situation.

int function ()
{
  if (!somecondition) return false;

  internalStructure  *str1;
  internalStructure *str2;
  char *dataPointer;
  float xyz;

  /* do something here with the above local variables */    
}

Considering the if statement in the above code can return from the function, I can declare the variables in two places.

  1. Before the if statement.
  2. After the if statement.

As a programmer, I would think to keep the variable declaration after if Statement.

Does the declaration place cost something? Or is there some other reason to prefer one way over the other?

8
  • 5
    As far as I understand, allocating stack space is just incrementing the stack pointer. How much stack space a function needs is determined at compile time, by looking at all variable declarations. Initializing a variable is something that happens at runtime, so that will affect performance. Jan 1, 2015 at 10:54
  • 3
    Look at assembler code generated for both options - it should give You a clear answer. Just make sure You're using the same compiler optimization settings as for release build.
    – kestasx
    Jan 1, 2015 at 15:31
  • 68
    If you care about performance then you should have some way to measure the performance of your application. If you have the ability to measure performance then you can answer your own question: try it both ways and you will soon know. If you don't have any method for measuring performance but you care about performance then your question should be "how do I set up tools to measure my performance?" Jan 1, 2015 at 16:50
  • 1
    Can you do that in C?
    – Salman A
    Jan 2, 2015 at 20:06
  • 2
    @g24l: The fact that most questions can be answered the same way indicates why such questions are a bad fit for this site. Right up there with "what does this code do?" questions; you wrote the code, run it and see what it does, and then you'll know. Dec 5, 2015 at 0:35

12 Answers 12

99

In C99 and later (or with the common conforming extension to C89), you are free to mix statements and declarations.

Just as in earlier versions (only more so as compilers got smarter and more aggressive), the compiler decides how to allocate registers and stack, or do any number of other optimizations conforming to the as-if-rule.
That means performance-wise, there's no expectation of any difference.

Anyway, that was not the reason such was allowed:

It was for restricting scope, and thus reducing the context a human must keep in mind when interpreting and verifying your code.

3
  • 1
    thanks for your reply, and to all. If i understand correctly your statement, it does not cost any performance issue, but brings out the clarity. Is that right ?
    – Whoami
    Jan 1, 2015 at 10:37
  • 5
    If you want to see the optimizer in action, write a function with declarations which initialize like char *foo = "something", compile your code with optimizer and debugging flags (gcc -O3 -g for example) and step through the function in the debugger. The step point will bounce around and delay initializing the variable until it needs it.
    – Schwern
    Jan 2, 2015 at 4:08
  • 6
    +1 for noting the importance of reducing brain-power overhead here... many people forget about it.
    – user719662
    Jan 3, 2015 at 13:35
44

Do whatever makes sense, but current coding style recommends putting variable declarations as close to their usage as possible

In reality, variable declarations are free on virtually every compiler after the first one. This is because virtually all processors manage their stack with a stack pointer (and possibly a frame pointer). For example, consider two functions:

int foo() {
    int x;
    return 5; // aren't we a silly little function now
}

int bar() {
    int x;
    int y;
    return 5; // still wasting our time...
}

If I were to compile these on a modern compiler (and tell it not to be smart and optimize out my unused local variables), I'd see this (x64 assembly example.. others are similar):

foo:
push ebp
mov  ebp, esp
sub  esp, 8    ; 1. this is the first line which is different between the two
mov  eax, 5    ; this is how we return the value
add  esp, 8    ; 2. this is the second line which is different between the two
ret

bar:
push ebp
mov  ebp, esp
sub  esp, 16    ; 1. this is the first line which is different between the two
mov  eax, 5     ; this is how we return the value
add  esp, 16    ; 2. this is the second line which is different between the two
ret

Note: both functions have the same number of opcodes!

This is because virtually all compilers will allocate all of the space they need up front (barring fancy things like alloca which are handled separately). In fact, on x64, it is mandatory that they do so in this efficient manner.

(Edit: As Forss pointed out, the compiler may optimize some of the local variables into registers. More technically, I should be arguing that the first varaible to "spill over" into the stack costs 2 opcodes, and the rest are free)

For the same reasons, compilers will collect all of the local variable declarations, and allocate space for them right up front. C89 requires all declarations to be up-front because it was designed to be a 1 pass compiler. For the C89 compiler to know how much space to allocate, it needed to know all of the variables before emitting the rest of the code. In modern languages, like C99 and C++, compilers are expected to be much smarter than they were back in 1972, so this restriction is relaxed for developer convenience.

Modern coding practices suggest putting the variables close to their usage

This has nothing to do with compilers (which obviously could not care one way or another). It has been found that most human programmers read code better if the variables are put close to where they are used. This is just a style guide, so feel free to disagree with it, but there is a remarkable consensus amongst developers that this is the "right way."

Now for a few corner cases:

  • If you are using C++ with constructors, the compiler will allocate the space up front (since it's faster to do it that way, and doesn't hurt). However, the variable will not be constructed in that space until the correct location in the flow of the code. In some cases, this means putting the variables close to their use can even be faster than putting them up front... flow control might direct us around the variable declaration, in which case the constructor doesn't even need to be called.
  • alloca is handled on a layer above this. For those who are curious, alloca implementations tend to have the effect of moving the stack pointer down some arbitrary amount. Functions using alloca are required to keep track of this space in one way or another, and make sure the stack pointer gets re-adjusted upwards before leaving.
  • There may be a case where you usually need 16-bytes of stack space, but on one condition you need to allocate a local array of 50kB. No matter where you put your variables in the code, virtually all compilers will allocate 50kB+16B of stack space every time the function gets called. This rarely matters, but in obsessively recursive code this could overflow the stack. You either have to move the code working with the 50kB array into its own function, or use alloca.
  • Some platforms (ex: Windows) need a special function call in the prologue if you allocate more than a page worth of stack space. This should not change analysis very much at all (in implementation, it is a very fast leaf function that just pokes 1 word per page).
12
  • Please be explicit and say C89, ISO C90, K&R C, etc. " requires all declarations to be up-front because it was designed to be a 1 pass compiler." You obviously know the difference because you call out C99 as an exception, but C!=C89. Arguably, right now, C=C11. Jan 1, 2015 at 21:56
  • Note also that one can use {} to mix declarations and code in C89, provided the scoping works. Jan 1, 2015 at 22:00
  • @Jeff: Ahh, I did not know that you could use braces in such a way. Guess that's what I get for being a C++ person trying to answer using C terminology!
    – Cort Ammon
    Jan 1, 2015 at 22:03
  • C++ is a superset of C89, so you should be okay most of the time. C99 will get you though, because it's not a strict subset of C++03. Jan 1, 2015 at 22:06
  • "In reality, variable declarations are free on virtually every compiler after the first one." Is this true if you consider using more variables than the compiler can optimize into registers?
    – Forss
    Jan 2, 2015 at 23:39
21

In C, I believe all variable declarations are applied as if they were at the top of the function declaration; if you declare them in a block, I think it's just a scoping thing (I don't think it's the same in C++). The compiler will perform all optimizations on the variables, and some may even effectively disappear in the machine code in higher optimizations. The compiler will then decide how much space is needed by the variables, and then later, during execution, create a space known as the stack where the variables live.

When a function is called, all of the variables that are used by your function are put on the stack, along with information about the function that is called (i.e. the return address, parameters, etc.). It doesn't matter where the variable was declared, just that it was declared - and it will be allocated onto the stack, regardless.

Declaring variables isn't "expensive," per se; if it's easy enough to be not used as a variable, the compiler will probably remove it as a variable.

Check this out:

Da stack

Wikipedia on call stacks, Some other place on the stack

Of course, all of this is implementation-dependent and system-dependent.

7
  • How would that work with VLAs? Or completely eliminating the variable / it's stack space? Or aliasing slots? Jan 1, 2015 at 11:15
  • @Deduplicator Apparently, it increases the size of the stack frame (according to this presentation). It says alloca, but the two are linked. alloca allocates space from the stack. Reminder: those are implementation defined. Jan 1, 2015 at 11:23
  • Just thought to prod you with some constructs your explanation would preclude just now, so you can refine it. Jan 1, 2015 at 11:26
  • @Deduplicator I'm sorry? I don't think I understand what you're trying to say. Jan 1, 2015 at 11:28
  • 6
    @Paul It's not unusual to draw the stack "reversed" if you so wish (the top of the stack being at the top of the paper has obvious advantages if you draw by hand). And in any case you might want to tell HP that they've been doing it wrong all those years (PA-RISC traditionally has the stack growing upwards ;) Heck if you don't have push and pop operations (do any RISC ISAs actually?) it's just a convention - MULTICS had upward growing stacks.
    – Voo
    Jan 1, 2015 at 13:20
12

Yes, it can cost clarity. If there is a case where the function must do nothing at all on some condition, (as when finding the global false, in your case), then placing the check at the top, where you show it above, is surely easier to understand - something that is essential while debugging and/or documenting.

11

It ultimately depends on the compiler but usually all locals are allocated at the beginning of the function.

However, the cost of allocating local variables is very small as they are put on the stack (or are put in a register after optimization).

4
  • "all locals are allocated at the beginning of the function". do you mean if i use lazy approach also, does it get allocated ?
    – Whoami
    Jan 1, 2015 at 10:40
  • Probably yes. It's up to the compiler how to do it but the easiest way is to allocate all at the beginning and deallocate all att the end.
    – Brainstorm
    Jan 1, 2015 at 10:43
  • 2
    However the allocation is just a single add instruction so it is incredably cheep. Not at all like using malloc.
    – Brainstorm
    Jan 1, 2015 at 10:45
  • But, looking at all other engineers reply, it seems to be no performance or any other expenses in any manner except readability? :)
    – Whoami
    Jan 1, 2015 at 10:45
7

The best practice is to adapt a lazy approach, i.e., declare them only when you really need them ;) (and not before). It results in the following benefit:

Code is more readable if those variables are declared as near to the place of usage as possible.

5
  • 4
    This is incorrect (at least for me). I find that code is much more readable (and editable - I don't have to go hunting through the code to change a declaration) if all variables are declared in a block at the top of the function, rather than scattered through the code. And as others have pointed out, compilers are smart enough to optimize allocations.
    – jamesqf
    Jan 1, 2015 at 17:57
  • 2
    For you, maybe; but not for the majority of the coding community!
    – CinCout
    Jan 2, 2015 at 4:50
  • 3
    This is incorrect, period. The example uses variables that are statically allocated on the stack. The compiler will generate an instruction to reserve memory on the stack for those local variables no matter where they are are declared within that function. Jan 2, 2015 at 5:51
  • @binaryBaBa Your second point "You end up not allocating memory for the variables at an earlier stage" is not related to code readability, and as others already mentioned, I don't think it's correct.
    – T J
    Jan 2, 2015 at 8:26
  • Yeah it makes sense to me given the improved compilers now-a-days. Edited accordingly.
    – CinCout
    Jan 2, 2015 at 8:28
6

Keep the declaration as close to where it's used as possible. Ideally inside nested blocks. So in this case it would make no sense to declare the variables above the if statement.

5

If you have this

int function ()
{
   {
       sometype foo;
       bool somecondition;
       /* do something with foo and compute somecondition */
       if (!somecondition) return false;
   }
   internalStructure  *str1;
   internalStructure *str2;
   char *dataPointer;
   float xyz;

   /* do something here with the above local variables */    
}

then the stack space reserved for foo and somecondition can be obviously reused for str1etc., so by declaring after the if, you may save stack space. Depending on the optimization capabilities of the compiler, the saving of stack space may also take place if you flatten the fucntion by removing the inner pair of braces or if you do declare str1 etc. before the if; however, this requires the compiler/optimizer to notice that the scopes do not "really" overlap. By positining the declarations after the if you facilitate this behaviour even without optimization - not to mention the improved code readability.

5

Whenever you allocate local variables in a C scope (such as a functions), they have no default initialization code (such as C++ constructors). And since they're not dynamically allocated (they're just uninitialized pointers), no additional (and potentially expensive) functions need to be invoked (e.g. malloc) in order to prepare/allocate them.

Due to the way the stack works, allocating a stack variable simply means decrementing the stack pointer (i.e. increasing the stack size, because on most architectures, it grows downwards) in order to make room for it. From the CPU's perspective, this means executing a simple SUB instruction: SUB rsp, 4 (in case your variable is 4 bytes large--such as a regular 32-bit integer).

Moreover, when you declare multiple variables, your compiler is smart enough to actually group them together into one large SUB rsp, XX instruction, where XX is the total size of a scope's local variables. In theory. In practice, something a little different happens.

In situations like these, I find GCC explorer to be an invaluable tool when it comes to finding out (with tremendous ease) what happens "under the hood" of the compiler.

So let's take a look at what happens when you actually write a function like this: GCC explorer link.

C code

int function(int a, int b) {
  int x, y, z, t;

  if(a == 2) { return 15; }

  x = 1;
  y = 2;
  z = 3;
  t = 4;

  return x + y + z + t + a + b;
}

Resulting assembly

function(int, int):
    push    rbp
    mov rbp, rsp
    mov DWORD PTR [rbp-20], edi
    mov DWORD PTR [rbp-24], esi
    cmp DWORD PTR [rbp-20], 2
    jne .L2
    mov eax, 15
    jmp .L3
.L2:
    -- snip --
.L3:
    pop rbp
    ret

As it turns out, GCC is even smarter than that. It doesn't even perform the SUB instruction at all to allocate the local variables. It just (internally) assumes that the space is "occupied", but doesn't add any instructions to update the stack pointer (e.g. SUB rsp, XX). This means that the stack pointer is not kept up to date but, since in this case no more PUSH instructions are performed (and no rsp-relative lookups) after the stack space is used, there's no issue.

Here's an example where no additional variables are declared: http://goo.gl/3TV4hE

C code

int function(int a, int b) {
  if(a == 2) { return 15; }
  return a + b;
}

Resulting assembly

function(int, int):
    push    rbp
    mov rbp, rsp
    mov DWORD PTR [rbp-4], edi
    mov DWORD PTR [rbp-8], esi
    cmp DWORD PTR [rbp-4], 2
    jne .L2
    mov eax, 15
    jmp .L3
.L2:
    mov edx, DWORD PTR [rbp-4]
    mov eax, DWORD PTR [rbp-8]
    add eax, edx
.L3:
    pop rbp
    ret

If you take a look at the code before the premature return (jmp .L3, which jumps to the cleanup and return code), no additional instructions are invoked to "prepare" the stack variables. The only difference is that the function parameters a and b, which are stored in the edi and esi registers, are loaded onto the stack at a higher address than in the first example ([rbp-4] and [rbp - 8]). This is because no additional space has been "allocated" for the local variables like in the first example. So, as you can see, the only "overhead" for adding those local variables is a change in a subtraction term (i.e. not even adding an additional subtraction operation).

So, in your case, there is virtually no cost for simply declaring stack variables.

4

I prefer keeping the "early out" condition at the top of the function, in addition to documenting why we are doing it. If we put it after a bunch of variable declarations, someone not familiar with the code could easily miss it, unless they know they have to look for it.

Documenting the "early out" condition alone is not always sufficient, it is better to make it clear in the code as well. Putting the early out condition at the top also makes it easier to keep the document in sync with the code, for instance, if we later decide to remove the early out condition, or to add more such conditions.

4

If it actually mattered the only way to avoid allocating the variables is likely to be:

int function_unchecked();

int function ()
{
  if (!someGlobalValue) return false;
  return function_unchecked();
}

int function_unchecked() {
  internalStructure  *str1;
  internalStructure *str2;
  char *dataPointer;
  float xyz;

  /* do something here with the above local variables */    
}

But in practice I think you'll find no performance benefit. If anything a minuscule overhead.

Of course if you were coding C++ and some of those local variables had non-trivial constructors you would probably need to place them after the check. But even then I don't think it would help to split the function.

1

If you declare variables after if statement and returned from the function immediately the compiler does not commitment memory in the stack.

1
  • @ThomasPapamilhos: Not so. The answer is actually undefined but in my experience most compilers will allocate the full space to complete the function on entry to avoid repeated moves of the stack pointer which gain almost nothing.
    – Persixty
    Jan 14, 2015 at 13:09

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