So I have a spring controller that looks like:

@Controller // the org.springframework.stereotype.Controller
@RequestMapping("/test")
public class TestController extends BaseController {
    ...
}

And this works fine. However when I am trying to refactor the code, to move BaseController to an external project "common", the project build will fail with followint stacktrace:

SEVERE: Servlet /mee threw load() exception
java.io.FileNotFoundException: class path resource [ca/wherego/common/controllers/BaseController.class] cannot be opened because it does not exist
    at org.springframework.core.io.ClassPathResource.getInputStream(ClassPathResource.java:157)
    at org.springframework.core.type.classreading.SimpleMetadataReader.<init>(SimpleMetadataReader.java:49)
    at org.springframework.core.type.classreading.SimpleMetadataReaderFactory.getMetadataReader(SimpleMetadataReaderFactory.java:80)

I have tried two ways of using the external project:

1) Let maven uses it as:

<dependency>
    <groupId>my.api</groupId>
    <artifactId>common</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.1</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${basedir}/lib/common-1.0.1.jar</systemPath>
</dependency>

and place the maven in the correct folder ( I don't have a private maven build, so I can't properly upload it as I use other public maven dependencies).

2) I tried to use the "common" project as the project dependency in the build path.

However none of the methods work.. Am I missing anything? Thanks!

  • Is the package for BaseController ca.wherego.common.controllers? If not that could be your problem. – Mark Madej Jan 2 '15 at 5:27
  • 3
    You have the scope specified as system. That means you have to manually supply the jar on the classpath at runtime. – chrylis Jan 2 '15 at 5:29
  • @chrylis could you please inspire me how to do what? Thanks! – jamesdeath123 Jan 2 '15 at 5:44
  • @MarkMadej yes that is where it is located... Eclipse didn't give any error though. Only happening in compilation. – jamesdeath123 Jan 2 '15 at 5:45
  • 1
    Yes, don't use system scope. It's basically saying "don't do dependency management for this package". – chrylis Jan 2 '15 at 6:21

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