1

Having trouble dividing the strings below by multiple delimiters

Example data

            column1
row1   'ABC>DEF>GHI'
row2   'ABC>DEF>GHI'
row3   'ABC>DEF'
row4   'ABC>DEF'
row5   'ABC>DEF>GHI'

Goal

      col1  col2  col3
row1  'ABC' 'DEF' 'GHI'
row2  'ABC' 'DEF' 'GHI'
row3  'ABC' 'DEF'
row4  'ABC' 'DEF'
row5  'ABC' 'DEF' 'GHI'

I want to break this line into 3 columns before and after each >

I've managed these 2 case statements that capture before the first delimiter and after the last delimiter, but I'm stuck capturing between the two delimiters.

CASE 
   WHEN Indicator LIKE '%>%' 
     THEN LEFT (column1, Charindex('>' , column1) - 1) 
     ELSE col1 
END as col1

CASE 
   WHEN Indicator LIKE '%>%' 
      THEN RIGHT (column1, Charindex('>' , Reverse(column1)) - 1) 
END as col3

Any help would be much appreciated

Thanks

  • This seems like a poor schema design. You should really build an additional table with columns for the primary key from your original table, a parent field, and a value field – Joel Coehoorn Jan 2 '15 at 17:33
3

Use Parsename function trick to do this.

SELECT Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 1)) col1,
       Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 2)) col2,
       Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 3)) col3
FROM   tablename

Demo

create table #test(   column1 varchar(500))
insert #test values
('ABC > DEF > GHI'),
('ABC > DEF > GHI'),
('ABC > DEF      '),
('ABC > DEF      '),
('ABC > DEF > GHI')

SELECT Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 1)) col1,
       Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 2)) col2,
       Reverse(Parsename(Reverse(Replace(column1, ' > ', '.')), 3)) col3
FROM   #test 

Result:

col1    col2    col3
----    ----    ----
ABC     DEF     GHI
ABC     DEF     GHI
ABC     DEF     NULL
ABC     DEF     NULL
ABC     DEF     GHI
  • Your alternative (2nd) query doesn't work properly, partly because OP's delimiter isn't wrapped in spaces, but accounting for that it will return DEF in col3 and a blank col2 for rows with only 2 delimiters. Good use of PARSENAME() though. – Hart CO Jan 2 '15 at 17:54
  • See how Col2 is empty for rows 3 and 4?, it should be populated with DEF and Col3 should be empty for those. – Hart CO Jan 2 '15 at 18:01
  • @GoatCO - sorry didn't check properly. – Pரதீப் Jan 2 '15 at 18:05
  • Thanks @NoDisplayName this did the trick. I had to make a small adjustment in eliminating the spaces. I appreciate it. – Mike V. Jan 5 '15 at 16:24
1

You should not store delimited strings in a single field so much as it depends on you. Assuming you have no alternative but to parse the delimited string, here's a parsing function I often use:

/********************************************************************************************
        Create Parse Function
********************************************************************************************/
CREATE FUNCTION dbo.FN_PARSE(@chunk VARCHAR(4000), @delimiter CHAR(1), @index INT )
RETURNS VARCHAR(1000)
AS
BEGIN
    DECLARE
        @curIndex INT = 0,
        @pos INT = 1,
        @prevPos INT = 0,
        @result VARCHAR(1000)
    WHILE @pos > 0
    BEGIN
        SET @pos =  CHARINDEX(@delimiter, @chunk, @prevPos);
        IF(@pos > 0)
        BEGIN -- Characters between position and previous position
            SET @result = SUBSTRING(@chunk, @prevPos, @pos-@prevPos)
        END
        ELSE
        BEGIN -- Last Delim
            SET @result = SUBSTRING(@chunk, @prevPos, LEN(@chunk))
        END
        IF(@index = @curIndex)
        BEGIN
            RETURN @result
        END
        SET @prevPos = @pos + 1
        SET @curIndex = @curIndex + 1;
    END
    RETURN '' -- Else Empty
END

Usage is simple, call the function with three parameters, the field, the delimiter, and an index for which portion you wish to return.

SELECT dbo.FN_PARSE(column1,'>', 0) AS Col1
      ,dbo.FN_PARSE(column1,'>', 1) AS Col2
      ,dbo.FN_PARSE(column1,'>', 2) AS Col3
FROM YourTable

Note the index values begin at 0. Unlike PARSENAME() this will handle more than 4 sections, but this is also likely less efficient.

  • Thanks for all your input @goatco! I appreciate your time. – Mike V. Jan 5 '15 at 16:26

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