20

I got a very weird compile-time error:

class Super {
    Super(int[] array) {

    }
}

class Sub extends Super {
    private final int number = 1;

    Sub() {
        super(new int[] { number }); //error
    }
}

The error I get is

Cannot access field from static context

My question

Where is the static context? It doesn't seem as if static would even play a role here.

I stumbled across this attempting to answer someone else's question; found the error I got baffling. Can someone explain where the static context is?

2
  • 1
    Which compiler are you using? I get cannot reference number before supertype constructor has been called. See also the JLS 8.8.7.1. Explicit Constructor Invocations which states: "An explicit constructor invocation statement in a constructor body may not refer to any instance variables or instance methods or inner classes declared in this class or any superclass, or use this or super in any expression; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs."
    – Alexis C.
    Jan 2, 2015 at 19:26
  • @ZouZou I first encountered it on my phone's ide AIDE, which I'm pretty sure uses the Dalvik compiler. Then I hopped on my computer to try it on Eclipse Luna, using their JDK 8u25 compiler and got the same error message. I'm not sure why it's giving me the static context error, so I think I should reinstall Eclipse. As for AIDE, I'm not too surprised it gave me a funky error
    – Vince
    Jan 3, 2015 at 19:45

5 Answers 5

7

Your field number should be static, so that you can use it in constructor call. Otherwise you'll get cannot reference number before supertype constructor has been called because the field is not accessible before you call the constructor of the parent class.

So your code should look like:

class Super {
    Super(int[] array) {

    }
}

class Sub extends Super {
    private static final int number = 1;
    Sub() {
        super(new int[] { number }); //error
    }
}
1
  • This was not the error I received, however it is the proper error that should have been displayed. This was the problem. It was a few years ago, but looking back, this seems to be the best answer. Thank you for the contribution, sorry it took so long to accept. Although the other answers mentions a JLS query, it doesn't suggest a fault of notification, nor specify what the proper notification would be.
    – Vince
    Jun 29, 2020 at 20:55
5

From JLS 8.8.7

An explicit constructor invocation statement in a constructor body may not refer to any instance variables or instance methods or inner classes declared in this class or any superclass, or use this or super in any expression; otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.

At the time of the super call an instance of Sub will not yet exist

1
  • + 1. I think your last sentence is the key point. Since there is no instance available there, it actually makes sense for the compiler to consider this a "static context", just like inside a static method, or static initialization block, or the initializing expression of a static field. (Personally, I think the compiler would do better to use a separate error-message for this context, just for clarity and to avoid confusion. But the constraints are the same as in normal static contexts, so the compiler-writers were probably too tempted to Not Repeat Themselves.)
    – ruakh
    Jan 3, 2015 at 6:26
4

The thing is, super must be called before anything else is done in the subclass. It means, that number is not initialized at the time of the call, so you can't pass it to super. As to what it has to do with the "static context", I am not sure.

0

Try running the following program.

public class Main {

    public static class Super
    {
        Super(int number) {
            System.out.println("A");
        }
    }

    public static class Sub extends Super {

        private final Thing thing = new Thing();

        Sub() {
            super(3);
            System.out.println("B");
        }
    }

    public static final class Thing {
        Thing() {
            System.out.println("C");
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new Sub();
    }
}

The output is A, C, B. First the constructor of Super runs, then the instance field thing of Sub is initialised. Finally the lines of the Sub constructor following super are executed.

When you try to reference number, the field number has not been initialised yet and there is no Sub instance. The error message could be more helpful. On IntelliJ I'm getting "Cannot reference Sub.number before supertype constructor has been called".

0

Loading of classes is done from child class(if its having main method or caused by other class to load) to base class but initialization is happening in reverse order(Base class will initialized first). base class initialization is done before, at that time your number field will not be in existence as it is instance variable.

You can make it static(class variable) to load earlier and if its final then compiler will make an entry in constant pool at compile time only.so that JVM will able to get its value.

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