66

i have the following enum

enum EditMode {
    View = 0,
    Edit = 1,
    Delete = 2
}

Let's assume i have a variable of the enum type

var editMode = EditMode.Edit;

Why does the following code not work (goes straight to default)?

switch (editMode) {
    case EditMode.Delete:
        ...
        break;
    case EditMode.Edit:
        ...
        break;
    default:
        ...
        break;
    }
5
  • 1
    This code works in the TypeScript Playground. Are you sure your scripts are loading in the correct order? – Ryan Cavanaugh Jan 2 '15 at 19:25
  • I can also confirm it works in the Playground. – Faris Zacina Jan 2 '15 at 19:44
  • 3
    yes it does, it seems the issue is not the code itself. for some reason my code assigns not a number behind the enum but the string associated with the number eg istead of 1 (Edit) "1". why i can't understand. – Mantzas Jan 2 '15 at 19:49
  • 2
    Replace it with if/else and it should work. There are a bunch of typing issues/features in TypeScript. Eg. that one - github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript/issues/8618 – Alex Klaus Jan 29 '17 at 0:49
  • 1
    Actually this code is NOT working in the Typescript playground... editmode DELETE is not comparable to editmode EDIT – Kokodoko Jun 6 '17 at 13:50

12 Answers 12

91

I also had this problem. Easy way to get around it: add a + sign before your variable in the switch, i.e.

switch (+editMode) {
    case EditMode.Delete:
        ...
        break;
    case EditMode.Edit:
        ...
        break;
    default:
        ...
        break;
    }
3
  • 2
    This seems the only way to fix the typescript glitch / bug. – Kokodoko Jun 6 '17 at 13:50
  • 17
    So the + will change it to a number, and that seems to work. I think this does not seem like a great solution. I also tried assigning the first item to 0 in my enum and it did not help. Seems like a bug. – nycynik Jul 15 '17 at 21:20
  • + is a hack that coerces it to a number. My answer below is correct based on modern Typescript version. – java-addict301 Jul 1 '20 at 17:45
23

i have found why i does happen. somewhere in the code there is a activation function (i am using durandal) which passes this enum as a string (the function has the parameter marked as a enum but still it is a string). this is why my switch statement fails. i simply converted the value to a number and now everything works as expected. thanks anyways

1
  • 3
    This was the problem for me as well. My constructor had a parameter of type Enum, but an outside caller was passing a string. I changed the constructor parameter to be of type string, and used EnumType[parameter] to convert it to the enum. – mfanto May 9 '15 at 23:53
9

The issue here has to do with typescript's (numeric) literal types. When you do this assignment:

var editMode = EditMode.Edit

TypeScript evaluates the type as:

var editMode: 1 = EditMode.Edit

Now, when you compare a value that typescript knows must be 1 (EditMode.Edit) to a value that it knows must be 0 (EditMode.View), it sees all this as a type-safety violation. If the variable editMode weren't an enum, typescript would merely complain, but since it's an enum, which doesn't really exist in javascript, typescript gets to control the transpilation in such a way that it actually throws an error.
So you have 2 options. So you can either coerce editMode to be a number or to be an EditMode (i.e. any of the values EditMode is permitted to be, not just the one assigned to editMode the variable).
Personally, I prefer to coerce it to be an EditMode, because it feels more type-safe.

To go the number route, you can do the following, which was previously mentioned:

switch(+editMode)

To go the EditMode route (which I recommend), you can pass it to a function as was mentioned, but sometimes it's a little cleaner to not write a function. If that's the case here, then you can again coerce the type in the switch statement:

switch(editMode as EditMode)

Do whichever you prefer, but I just like the clarity of explicitly saying "this variable is being treated as an EditMode" as opposed to "this variable is supposed to actually be a number, not an Enum".

7

TypeScript version 3.7.5

this code worked for me

enum Seasons {
    Winter,
    Spring,
    Summer,
    Autum
  }

switch (+Seasons.Winter) {
    case Seasons.Winter:
        console.log('weather is cold');
        break;
    case Seasons.Spring:
        console.log('weather is spring');
        break;
    case Seasons.Summer:
        console.log('weather is summer');
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

visual studio code: seasons

or you can declare a constant and use as param for switch statement

const season: Seasons = Seasons.Winter
switch (+season) {
    case Seasons.Winter:
        console.log('weather is cold');
        break;
    case Seasons.Spring:
        console.log('weather is spring');
        break;
    case Seasons.Summer:
        console.log('weather is summer');
        break;
    default:
        break;
}

enter image description here

1
  • 1
    it doesn't work without the plus ('+'). how come it solves the problem? – Mustafa Chelik Oct 5 '20 at 2:15
3

In case somebody else ends up here and the above options don't seem to be the issue, double-check that all of your switch statements are breaking/returning! The Typescript compiler is smart enough to see that if your case cascades through to another one, the value you're comparing on may never hit the case you expect.

let handlerName;

switch(method){
  case 'create':
    handlerName = 'createHandler';
    break;
  case 'update';
    handlerName = 'updateHandler';
    // Here is where the forgotten break would go
  default:
    throw new Error('Unrecognized Method');
}

switch(handlerName){
  case 'createHandler':
    ...
    break;
  case 'updateHandler':
    // You will see an error on this case because
    // the compiler knows that execution will never
    // arrive here with handler === 'updateHandler'
  default:
    throw new Error('Unrecognized Handler');
}
3

Change your EditMode enum definition to:

enum EditMode {
    View = "View",
    Edit = "Edit",
    Delete = "Delete"
}

Typescript 3.6.3

1

With //@ts-ignore suppress you can do:

//@ts-ignore
switch (EditMode[editMode] as EditMode) {
    case EditMode.Delete:
        ...
        break;
    case EditMode.Edit:
        ...
        break;
    default:
        ...
        break;
    }
}
0

If the enum is defined in a separate typescript file, ensure it's marked with "export" and that you import it correctly at the top of the typescript file you're referencing it in.

0

Use it like this.

const enum OperationsType{
    CREATE="CREATE",
    DELETE="DELETE",
    UPDATE="UPDATE"
}
0
-1

If you use the switch expression in a function with typed parameter, this works as expected.

Example:

enum EditMode {
    View,
    Edit,
    Delete,
}

function testSwitch(editMode: EditMode) {
    switch(editMode) {
        case EditMode.Delete:
            console.log("delete");
            break;
        case EditMode.Edit:
            console.log("edit");
            break;
        default:
            console.log("default");
            break;
    }
}

testSwitch(EditMode.Edit)

will compile 🥳 and output edit 👍

-1

In my case I had the switch inside a condition, which was coercing the enum into a value:

enum A {
    VAL_A,
    VAL_B,
    VAL_C
}
interface ia {
    maybe?: A
}
const o: ia = {maybe: 0}
if(o.maybe){ //<-- o.maybe is not falsey (thus, is not 0)
    switch(o.maybe) {
        case A.VAL_A: //<-- Error! we know that o.maybe is not 0. Its VAL_B | VAL_C
        break;
    }

}

-3

Declare your enum using const:

const enum EditMode {
    View = 0,
    Edit = 1,
    Delete = 2
}
1
  • This does not fix it for me. – rotgers Jul 17 '19 at 10:25

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