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I have encountered strange behavior of Java 8 CompletableFuture thenCompose method. I have two tests that differ only in order of execution. Both tests simulate failure in the CompletableFuture generated in thenCompose.

@Test
public void completedAfter() {
    CompletableFuture<String> future1 = new CompletableFuture<>();
    CompletableFuture<String> future2 = new CompletableFuture<>();

    future1.thenCompose(x -> future2).whenComplete((r, e) -> System.out.println("After: " + e));

    future1.complete("value");
    future2.completeExceptionally(new RuntimeException());
}

@Test
public void completedBefore() {
    CompletableFuture<String> future1 = new CompletableFuture<>();
    CompletableFuture<String> future2 = new CompletableFuture<>();

    future1.complete("value");
    future2.completeExceptionally(new RuntimeException());

    future1.thenCompose(x -> future2).whenComplete((r, e) -> System.out.println("Before: " +e));
}

The output is:

After: java.util.concurrent.CompletionException: java.lang.RuntimeException
Before: java.lang.RuntimeException

The question is, why is the exception wrapped in CompletionException in one case but not in the other?

Update: Here is related bug report. It has been marked and resolved as a bug in JDK.

  • 1
    Have you looked at Guava's ListenableFuture? If you are not locked into the framework, I suggest using Guava's implementation. In my totally opinionated view, it is feature complete and much easier to use. Disclamer, I am in no way affiliated with Google. – Alexander Pogrebnyak Jan 2 '15 at 20:25
  • 1
    There has been a lot of traffic on Completablefuture on the concurrency interest list. The November lists might be of interest to you: cs.oswego.edu/pipermail/concurrency-interest/2014-November/… – edharned Jan 2 '15 at 23:28
2

Seems like a bug in the jdk library.

In the "After" case, .thenCompose adds a ThenCopy completion node to the target future, whose execution is later triggered by .completeExceptionally. The completion node's run method finds the exception on the future, and calls .internalComplete on the destination, that wraps all exceptions into CompletionException. See here how the node is created, and here for where the wrapping happens.

Now, in the Before case, the code path is completely different. Because the future is already completed, .thenCompose does not create additional nodes, but invokes the callback right away, and simply returns an (already completed second future), on which you then call .whenComplete, which, again, does not bother to create a new completion node, but simply invokes the callback right away, giving it the original exception from the second future.

Boy, looking at this code, there are so many examples I want to show to my students of what they should never do ...

  • Why a bug? Does the behavior violate any contracts? – Marko Topolnik Jan 2 '15 at 22:27
  • @MarkoTopolnik It's quite unclear. This has to do with dependent CompletionStages. Dependencies on a single stage are arranged using methods with prefix then. and if a stage's computation terminates abruptly with an (unchecked) exception or error, then all dependent stages requiring its completion complete exceptionally as well, with a CompletionException holding the exception as its cause. – Sotirios Delimanolis Jan 2 '15 at 22:33
  • @MarkoTopolnik I did not see it mentioned explicitly anywhere that all exceptions, thrown by the future will be wrapped into a CompletableException, but I doubt the intent is that they are sometimes wrapped, and sometimes are not, depending on the ... what? cpu speed? I mean, this behavior is non-deterministic. Perhaps, a "bug" was too strong of a word. Let's call it "undesired feature"? – Dima Jan 2 '15 at 22:53
  • Thanks, I will file a bug and we will see how Oracle reacts. – Lukas Jan 3 '15 at 9:54

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