32

I have a problem regarding changing the Execution Policy in my Windows Server 2008+ OS. It is the first time I try to run a script for which I need resource full access and I try the following after starting Powershell in elevated mode:

Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted

But I get this:

Set-ExecutionPolicy : Windows PowerShell updated your execution policy
successfully, but the setting is overridden by a policy defined at a more
specific scope.  Due to the override, your shell will retain its current
effective execution policy of RemoteSigned. Type "Get-ExecutionPolicy -List"
to view your execution policy settings. For more information please see
"Get-Help Set-ExecutionPolicy".
At line:1 char:1
+ Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted
+ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : PermissionDenied: (:) [Set-ExecutionPolicy], SecurityException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : ExecutionPolicyOverride,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.SetExecutionPolicyCommand

Though I am Administrator, I cannot change the Execution Policy. What to do?

32

The error message indicates that the setting you're trying to define via Set-ExecutionPolicy is overridden by a setting in another scope. Use Get-ExecutionPolicy -List to see which scope has which setting.

PS C:\> Get-ExecutionPolicy -List

        Scope    ExecutionPolicy
        -----    ---------------
MachinePolicy          Undefined
   UserPolicy          Undefined
      Process          Undefined
  CurrentUser          Undefined
 LocalMachine       RemoteSigned

PS C:\> Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted -Scope Process -Force
PS C:\> Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted -Scope CurrentUser -Force
Set-ExecutionPolicy : Windows PowerShell updated your execution policy
successfully, but the setting is overridden by a policy defined at a more
specific scope.  Due to the override, your shell will retain its current
effective execution policy of Restricted. Type "Get-ExecutionPolicy -List"
to view your execution policy settings. ...
PS C:\> Get-ExecutionPolicy -List

        Scope    ExecutionPolicy
        -----    ---------------
MachinePolicy          Undefined
   UserPolicy          Undefined
      Process         Restricted
  CurrentUser       Unrestricted
 LocalMachine       RemoteSigned

PS C:\> .\test.ps1
.\test.ps1 : File C:\test.ps1 cannot be loaded because running scripts is
disabled on this system. ...
PS C:\> Set-ExecutionPolicy Unestricted -Scope Process -Force
PS C:\> Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted -Scope CurrentUser -Force
Set-ExecutionPolicy : Windows PowerShell updated your execution policy
successfully, but the setting is overridden by a policy defined at a more
specific scope.  Due to the override, your shell will retain its current
effective execution policy of Restricted. Type "Get-ExecutionPolicy -List"
to view your execution policy settings. ...
PS C:\> Get-ExecutionPolicy -List

        Scope    ExecutionPolicy
        -----    ---------------
MachinePolicy          Undefined
   UserPolicy          Undefined
      Process       Unrestricted
  CurrentUser         Restricted
 LocalMachine       RemoteSigned

PS C:\> .\test.ps1
Hello World!

As you can see, both settings were defined despite the error, but the setting in the more specific scope (Process) still takes precedence, either preventing or allowing script execution.

Since the default scope is LocalMachine the error could be caused by a setting in the CurrentUser or Process scope. However, a more common reason is that script execution was configured via a group policy (either local or domain).

A local group policy can be modified by a local administrator via gpedit.msc (Local Group Policy Editor) as described in this answer.

A domain group policy cannot be superseded by local settings/policies and must be changed by a domain admin via gpmc.msc (Group Policy Management) on a domain controller.

For both local and domain policies the setting can be defined as a computer setting:

Computer Configuration
`-Administrative Templates
  `-Windows Components
    `-Windows PowerShell -> Turn on Script Execution

or as a user setting:

User Configuration
`-Administrative Templates
  `-Windows Components
    `-Windows PowerShell -> Turn on Script Execution

The former are applied to computer objects, whereas the latter are applied to user objects. For local polices there is no significant difference between user and computer policies, because user policies are automatically applied to all users on the computer.

A policy can have one of three states (or five states if you count the 3 settings available for the state Enabled separately):

  • Not Configured: policy does not control PowerShell script execution.
  • Enabled: allow PowerShell script execution.
    • Allow only signed scripts: allow execution of signed scripts only (same as Set-ExecutionPolicy AllSigned).
    • Allow local scripts and remote signed scripts: allow execution of all local scripts (signed or not) and of signed scripts from remote locations (same as Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned).
    • Allow all scripts: allow execution of local and remote scripts regardless of whether they're signed or not (same as Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted).
  • Disabled: disallow PowerShell script execution (same as Set-ExecutionPolicy Restricted).

Changes made via Set-ExecutionPolicy only become effective when local and domain policies are set to Not Configured (execution policy Undefined in the scopes MachinePolicy and UserPolicy).

31

The problem is that Windows does not allow all scripts to be executed in Unrestricted mode. Actually, no matter the execution policy for your user (even if administrator), the Local Group Policy will take priority.

And by default the local group script execution policy is such for which scripts are not allowed to be executed. We need to change it!

Changing the Local Group Execution Policy

We do this via the Local Group Policy Editor which you can reach by searching in the Windows Search bar for "group policy". Or do this:

  1. Open the Management Console by hitting Win + r and typing command mmc.
  2. Go to File -> Add Remove Snap In....
  3. In the left pane find Group Policy Object Editor and add it.
  4. Close the form.

Then on the left pane the group editor can be expanded. Expand it and navigate to Computer Configuration -> Administrative Templates -> Windows Components.

enter image description here

Then to Windows PowerShell.

enter image description here

So select Turn on Script Execution. Change configuration to Enabled and specify Allow all scripts in Execution Policy.

enter image description here

Confirm by hitting Ok and close the Management Console.

  • 1
    Another excellent answer with lots of detail, but in a different direction! – Mike Shepard Jan 3 '15 at 18:04
  • Thank you very much :) – Andry Jan 5 '15 at 10:07
  • 4
    What do you do if Windows Power Shell is not in the list? – Rob Sedgwick Sep 25 '15 at 11:36
  • 1
    I found the answer, you need to download version 4 on Windows Power Shell from here: microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=40855 – Rob Sedgwick Oct 6 '15 at 12:19
  • Additionally, I had to install the hotfix in the answer below by @diganta-kumar – RekindledPhoenix Mar 25 '16 at 16:09
11

A hotfix is now available to install:

2.8.7 for VS 2013: https://github.com/NuGet/Home/releases/download/2.8.7/NuGet.Tools.vsix

3.1.1 for VS 2015: https://github.com/NuGet/Home/releases/download/3.1.1/NuGet.Tools.vsix

https://github.com/NuGet/Home/issues/974

  • 1
    This was the solution that worked for me – RekindledPhoenix Mar 25 '16 at 16:08
  • This one WORKS!! – Guru Jul 27 '16 at 2:49
  • 1
    Beware that this answer is unrelated to the problem described in the question. It resolves a problem with a Visual Studio extension. – Ansgar Wiechers Jul 19 '17 at 16:33
8

If you are running into this with visual studio 2015 recently, check if there are any updates for nuget package manager in tools > extensions and updates>

  • Works - Nice for those of us who work somewhere that github is blocked. – edhubbell Apr 6 '16 at 15:47
5

If the PowerShell ExecutionPolicy is being set by a Domain Controller through a group policy, you'll have to reset the ExecutionPolicy to "Bypass" in the registry after every boot. I've created a pair of startup scripts to automate the process. Below, I describe my process.

Create a folder called %USERPROFILE%\Documents\StartupScripts and then place a PowerShell script called ExecutionPolicy.ps1 in it with following code:

Push-Location
Set-Location HKLM:\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\PowerShell
Set-ItemProperty . ExecutionPolicy "Bypass"
Pop-Location

Then create a file called %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\Startup\Startup.cmd and place the following code in it:

PowerShell -Version 3.0 -Command "Set-ExecutionPolicy Unrestricted" >> "%TEMP%\StartupLog.txt" 2>&1
PowerShell -Version 3.0 "%USERPROFILE%\Documents\StartupScripts\ExecutionPolicy.ps1" >> "%TEMP%\StartupLog.txt" 2>&1

This script will run at the start of every login.

  • Thanks, that was the only working solution for me! – Robert Aug 3 '16 at 9:47
  • I don't think this gets around the group policy. At least not for me. In my case the key did not exist under HKLM though it did under HKCU. However your script still did not avoid the security. – Marc Nov 14 '16 at 10:59
  • 1
    This is terrible advice. Not only does it at best temporarily mitigate the symptom (group policies are re-applied periodically, by default every 90-120 minutes), it also usually means you're violating corporate policies, which may result in legal action. – Ansgar Wiechers Jul 19 '17 at 15:02
2

Create the following ps.cmd and put it in your PATH:

POWERSHELL -Command "$enccmd=[Convert]::ToBase64String([System.Text.Encoding]::Unicode.GetBytes((Get-Content '%1' | Out-String)));POWERSHELL -EncodedCommand $enccmd"

Now you can run any powershell script as in:

psa mypowershell.ps1
  • Good solution. Visual Studio 2015 running the scripts natively sometimes works and sometimes hangs. This works every time. Thanks Marc – Charles Byrne Apr 25 at 12:51
0

Even if @Ansgar Wiechers's Answer doesn't work.. Then there can be issue with you MachinePolicy Scope. So there can be one workaround for that issue is.. Edit the Registry Value for the ExecutionPolicy Key at

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE -> SOFTWARE -> Policies -> Microsoft -> Windows -> Powershell

it worked for me to execute ps script after trying out so many solutions.

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