3

I'm trying to design an embedded language in Haskell, and, if possible, I'd like to give a custom meaning to juxtaposition, which normally denotes function application. Or, almost equivalently, I would like to define a whitespace operator, which has a normal definable operator precedence.

Something like

( ) x y = x * y

which would then allow to write multiplication 3 * 4 as 3 4.

Is there any way in GHC (using any extension necessary) to implement this?

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  • 2
    That would be nice but how would you apply normal functions? Jan 3, 2015 at 12:50
  • It should only be overloaded for certain types, like (in my example) two numbers.
    – chtenb
    Jan 3, 2015 at 13:19
  • 1
    It won't work together with type inference. Jan 3, 2015 at 13:28
  • Maybe it would. I could imagine a type family Argument with type instance Argument (a -> b) a, where the term (x::a) (y::b) would generate the constraint Argument a ~ b. Surely, more code will need type annotations, but it could work. Jan 3, 2015 at 13:37

1 Answer 1

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Actually, yes!

{-# LANGUAGE FlexibleInstances #-}
module Temp where

instance Num a => Num (a -> a) where
  fromInteger n = (fromInteger n *)
  n + m = \x -> n x + m x
  -- ...

Then in ghci:

λ :l Temp
...
λ 3 (4 :: Int) :: Int
12
λ let _4 = 4 :: Int
λ 3 _4 :: Int
12
λ (3 + 4) (2 :: Int) :: Int
14

The symbols 0, 1, etc in Haskell are overloaded - 0 :: Num a => a - they can represent anything that has a Num instance. So by defining a Num instance for functions Num a => a -> a, we now have the 3 :: Num a => a -> a

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  • 1
    3 (4 :: Int) :: Int is hardly a gain over 3 * 4. Jan 3, 2015 at 13:07
  • Would it be possible to make this work without explicitly casting the result to Int like is done in 3 _4 :: Int?
    – chtenb
    Jan 3, 2015 at 13:16
  • The type annotation is needed in ghci only. In source file you could have twelve :: Int twelve = 3 4
    – phadej
    Jan 3, 2015 at 15:20
  • 1
    Strictly speaking, this does not overload juxtaposition. Juxtaposition is still function application. It is quite clever though! Jan 4, 2015 at 3:49

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