8

Is there a way to leverage the functionality of .NET's XmlSerializer class in PowerShell?

More specifically, the ability to easily de/serialize .NET types into Xml e.g.

XmlSerializer s = new XmlSerializer(typeof(MyType));
TextReader r = new StreamReader("sample.xml");
MyType myType = (MyType)s.Deserialize(r);
r.Close();

I know I can call above from PowerShell, but is there a way to avoid defining MyType in a separate assembly? Thanks

[Edit] Since seems to be that .NET-like types cannot be added from PowerShell, allow me to re-target my question: is there an easy way, like XmlSerializer, to serialize types in PowerShell? I have to read/write some .xml's from PS, and would rather leverage such functionality before manually doing it.

  • And where would you take MyType from if not from an assembly? YOu can't define types in PowerShell directly; have have to use Add-Type for that. – Joey May 5 '10 at 19:04
  • That's exactly my question - is there a way to somehow define the type in PowerShell, and then pass use it for serialization? Based on your answer, seems not, therefore have to define types in an assembly... What a pain - I wanted to create an entire script-based solution for a problem without requiring assemblies et al. Thanks. – Ariel May 5 '10 at 19:09
  • 1
    "is there an easy way, like XmlSerializer, to serialize types in PowerShell" Import/Export-CliXml should work well. – stej May 6 '10 at 6:04
10

Sure, you can define a type within Powershell, and use it in serialization.

The first step is defining a new type. In Powershell 2.0, you can do that by calling Add-Type . Once you have the dynamically-compiled assembly containing the new type, you can use the type freely, as any other .NET type.

Step 2 is to just use the XmlSerializer class, as you would normally - just translate the C# code you provided in the question to Powershell.

The following example illustrates. It defines a simple type, then deserializes from an XML string to create a new instance of that type. It then prints out the property values on that de-serialized instance.

$source1 = @"
using System;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace MyDynamicTypes
{
    [XmlRoot]
    public class Foo
    {
    [XmlElement]
    public string Message { get; set; }

    [XmlAttribute]
    public int Flavor { get; set; }
    }
}
"@

Add-Type -TypeDefinition $source1 -Language "CSharpVersion3" -ReferencedAssemblies System.Xml.dll

$xml1 = @"
<Foo Flavor='19'>
  <Message>Ephesians 5:11</Message>
</Foo>
"@

$f1 = New-Object MyDynamicTypes.Foo
$sr = New-Object System.IO.StringReader($xml1)
$s1 = New-Object System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer( $f1.GetType() )
$xtr = New-Object System.Xml.XmlTextReader($sr)
$foo = $s1.Deserialize($xtr)

Write-Output ("foo.Flavor = " + $foo.Flavor)
Write-Output ("foo.Message = " + $foo.Message)

Thanks to Keith Hill for pointing Add-Type out.


In Powershell 1.0, you can do something similar with some custom code (see Powershell: compiling c# code stored in a string) .

function Compile-Code {
param (
    [string[]] $code       = $(throw "The parameter -code is required.")
  , [string[]] $references = @()
  , [switch]   $asString   = $false
  , [switch]   $showOutput = $false
  , [switch]   $csharp     = $true
  , [switch]   $vb         = $false
)

$options    = New-Object "System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary``2[System.String,System.String]";
$options.Add( "CompilerVersion", "v3.5")

if ( $vb ) {
    $provider = New-Object Microsoft.VisualBasic.VBCodeProvider $options
} else {
    $provider = New-Object Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider $options
}

$parameters = New-Object System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerParameters

@( "mscorlib.dll", "System.dll", "System.Core.dll", "System.Xml.dll", ([System.Reflection.Assembly]::GetAssembly( [PSObject] ).Location) ) + $references | Sort -unique |% { $parameters.ReferencedAssemblies.Add( $_ ) } | Out-Null

$parameters.GenerateExecutable = $false
$parameters.GenerateInMemory   = !$asString
$parameters.CompilerOptions    = "/optimize"

if ( $asString ) {
    $parameters.OutputAssembly = [System.IO.Path]::GetTempFileName()
}

$results = $provider.CompileAssemblyFromSource( $parameters, $code )

if ( $results.Errors.Count -gt 0 ) {
    if ( $output ) {
    $results.Output |% { Write-Output $_ }
    } else {
    $results.Errors |% { Write-Error $_.ToString() }
    }
} else {
    if ( $asString ) {
    $content = [System.IO.File]::ReadAllBytes( $parameters.OutputAssembly )
    $content = [Convert]::ToBase64String( $content )

    [System.IO.File]::Delete( $parameters.OutputAssembly );

    return $content
    } else {
    return $results.CompiledAssembly
    }
}
}

Using that function, the app becomes:

$source1 = @"
using System;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace MyDynamicTypes
{
    [XmlRoot]
    public class Foo
    {
    [XmlElement]
    public string Message { get; set; }

    [XmlAttribute]
    public int Flavor { get; set; }
    }
}
"@

Compile-Code -csharp -code $source1

$xml1 = @"
<Foo Flavor='19'>
  <Message>Ephesians 5:11</Message>
</Foo>
"@

$f1 = New-Object MyDynamicTypes.Foo
$sr = New-Object System.IO.StringReader($xml1)
$s1 = New-Object System.Xml.Serialization.XmlSerializer( $f1.GetType() )
$xtr = New-Object System.Xml.XmlTextReader($sr)
$foo = $s1.Deserialize($xtr)

Write-Output ("foo.Flavor = " + $foo.Flavor)
Write-Output ("foo.Message = " + $foo.Message)
  • Thanks for the answer! Haven't tried this yet but the sole idea of dynamically compiling the types fills the whole I was trying to fill in my question. Thanks! – Ariel May 6 '10 at 18:47
  • You should check out the Add-Type cmdlet in PowerShell 2.0, specifically the TypeDefinition parameter. It would greatly simplify your script above. :-) – Keith Hill May 7 '10 at 4:40
  • I didn't realize powershell 2.0 was out! thanks, I'll check it out. – Cheeso May 7 '10 at 10:21
  • Any update to this for PS 4 or even 5? – quintessential5 Jun 17 '14 at 16:16
  • Plus 1 for the working script, and for the scripture reference. – MDMoore313 Mar 2 '16 at 15:56

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