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"T-SQL Querying" book (http://www.amazon.com/Inside-Microsoft-Querying-Developer-Reference/dp/0735626030) has an interesting example, where, querying a table under default transaction isolation level during clustered index key column update, you may miss a row or read a row twice. It looks to be acceptable, since updating table/entity key is not a good idea anyway. However, I've updated this example so that the same happens, when you update non-clustered index key column value.

Following is the table structure:

SET NOCOUNT ON;
USE master;
IF DB_ID('TestIndexColUpdate') IS NULL CREATE DATABASE TestIndexColUpdate;
GO
USE TestIndexColUpdate;
GO

IF OBJECT_ID('dbo.Employees', 'U') IS NOT NULL DROP TABLE dbo.Employees;
CREATE TABLE dbo.Employees
(
empid CHAR(900) NOT NULL, -- this column should be big enough, so that 9 rows fit on 2 index pages
salary MONEY NOT NULL,
filler CHAR(1) NOT NULL DEFAULT('a')
);
CREATE INDEX idx_salary ON dbo.Employees(salary) include (empid); -- include empid into index, so that test query reads from it
ALTER TABLE dbo.Employees ADD CONSTRAINT PK_Employees PRIMARY KEY NONCLUSTERED(empid);

INSERT INTO dbo.Employees(empid, salary) VALUES
('A', 1500.00),('B', 2000.00),('C', 3000.00),('D', 4000.00),
('E', 5000.00),('F', 6000.00),('G', 7000.00),('H', 8000.00),
('I', 9000.00);

This is what needs to be done in the first connection (on each update, the row will jump between 2 index pages):

SET NOCOUNT ON;
USE TestIndexColUpdate;

WHILE 1=1
BEGIN
    UPDATE dbo.Employees SET salary = 10800.00 - salary WHERE empid = 'I'; -- on each update, "I" employee jumps between 2 pages
END

This is what needs to be done in the second connection:

SET NOCOUNT ON;
USE TestIndexColUpdate;

DECLARE @c INT
WHILE 1 = 1
BEGIN
    SELECT salary, empid FROM dbo.Employees
    if @@ROWCOUNT <> 9 BREAK;
END

Normally, this query should return 9 records we inserted in the first code sample. However, very soon, I see 8 records being returned. This query reads all it's data from the "idx_salary" index, which is being updated by previous sample code. This seems to be quite lax attitude towards data consistency from SQL Server. I would expect some locking coordination, when data is being read from index, while its key column is being updated.

Do I interpret this behavior correctly? Does this mean, that even non-clustered index keys should not be updated?

UPDATE: To solve this problem, you only need to enable "snapshots" on the db (READ_COMMITTED_SNAPSHOT ON). No more deadlocking or missing rows. I've tried summarize all of this here: http://blog.konstantins.net/2015/01/missing-rows-after-updating-sql-server.html

UPDATE 2: This seems to be the very same problem, as in this good old article: http://blog.codinghorror.com/deadlocked/

0

1 Answer 1

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Do I interpret this behavior correctly?

Yes.

Does this mean, that even non-clustered index keys should not be updated?

No. You should use a proper isolation level or make the application tolerate the inconsistencies that READ COMMITTED allows.

This issue of missing rows is not limited to clustered indexes. It is caused by moving a row in a b-tree. Clustered and nonclustered indexes are implemented as b-trees with only tiny physical differences between them.

So you are seeing the exact same physical phenomenon. It applies every time your query reads a range of rows from a b-tree. The contents of that range can move around.

Use an isolation level that provides you the guarantees that you need. For read-only transactions the snapshot isolation level is usually a very elegant and total solution to concurrency. It seems to apply to your case.

This seems to be quite lax attitude towards data consistency from SQL Server. I would expect some locking coordination, when data is being read from index, while its key column is being updated.

This is an understandable request. On the other hand you specifically requested a low level of isolation. You can dial all the way up to SERIALIZABLE of you want. SERIALIZABLE presents you as-if serial execution.

Missing rows are just one special case of the many effects that READ COMMITTED allows. It makes no sense to specifically prevent them while allowing all kinds of other inconsistencies.


SET NOCOUNT ON;
USE TestIndexColUpdate;
SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL READ COMMITTED

DECLARE @c INT
WHILE 1 = 1
BEGIN
    DECLARE @count INT
    SELECT @count = COUNT(*) FROM dbo.Employees WITH (INDEX (idx_salary))
    WHERE empid > '' AND CONVERT(NVARCHAR(MAX), empid) > '__'
        AND salary > 0
    if @count <> 9 BREAK;
END
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  • It's interesting to see that if you remove loop from "reading" transaction and put it into REPEATABLE READ isolation level (the level, which solves the problem), you get into into deadlock error after just few runs.
    – Konstantin
    Jan 4, 2015 at 13:52
  • I don't think REPEATABLE READ is enough anyway. A row can be moved from the range that has not been read to the range that has already been read. The row can still go missing.
    – usr
    Jan 4, 2015 at 14:16
  • But this is exactly what was happening in my case before REPEATABLE READ (if you replace "range" with "page").
    – Konstantin
    Jan 4, 2015 at 15:03
  • Maybe a misunderstanding. I'm saying that with RC and RR levels the missing rows problem can happen. RR does not prevent it.
    – usr
    Jan 4, 2015 at 15:24
  • What if we look at particular example and not just any case of "missing rows"? In my example, there are no ranges, it's just that the row is jumping between index pages. It looks like RR acquires the necessary locks, but it results in a deadlock very soon.
    – Konstantin
    Jan 4, 2015 at 17:31

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