360

I would like to truncate a string such that its length is not longer than a given value. I am writing to a database table and want to ensure that the values I write meet the constraint of the column's datatype.

For instance, it would be nice if I could write the following:

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    return value.Substring(0, maxLength);
}

Unfortunately, this raises an exception because maxLength generally exceeds the boundaries of the string value. Of course, I could write a function like the following, but I was hoping that something like this already exists.

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    return value.Length <= maxLength ? value : value.Substring(0, maxLength);
} 

Where is the elusive API that performs this task? Is there one?

  • 24
    For the record, strings are immutable you can't truncate them you can only return a truncated copy of them. Nitpicky, I know. – John Weldon May 5 '10 at 20:55
  • 2
    @John Weldon: That's probably why the member function doesn't exist -- it doesn't follow the semantics of the datatype. On a side note, StringBuilder lets you truncate by shorterning the length, but you still need to perform the length check to avoid widening the string. – Steve Guidi May 5 '10 at 20:59
  • 1
    Whichever solution you pick, be sure to add a check for a null string before calling Substring or accessing the Length property. – Ray May 5 '10 at 20:59
  • 3
    @SteveGuidi - If that were the case, then there wouldn't be functions like Trim or Replace, which face similar semantic problems – Chris Rogers Aug 3 '16 at 23:20
  • 1
    @JohnWeldon More nitpicky than Microsoft themselves consistently are, as it happens - they're happy to document, for instance, .Trim() in a manner that makes it misleadingly sound like it mutates the string: "Removes all leading and trailing white-space characters from the current String object." – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 21:41

30 Answers 30

548

There isn't a Truncate() method on string, unfortunately. You have to write this kind of logic yourself. What you can do, however, is wrap this in an extension method so you don't have to duplicate it everywhere:

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) return value;
        return value.Length <= maxLength ? value : value.Substring(0, maxLength); 
    }
}

Now we can write:

var someString = "...";
someString = someString.Truncate(2);
  • 5
    Great Solution, but remembered this only works in NET 3.5 and Up. Don't try it in NET2.0. – Jedi Master Spooky May 5 '10 at 20:57
  • 7
    As long as you're in VS 2008, and presumably VS 2010, you could still do this even if targeting .Net 2.0. danielmoth.com/Blog/… – Mark May 5 '10 at 21:08
  • 4
    This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. – Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:57
  • 36
    @Bernard, this is supposed to fail if maxLength is negative. Any other behavior would be unexpected. – bojingo Feb 14 '14 at 20:09
  • 11
    You can call extension methods on null values. – Joel Malone Aug 14 '15 at 1:26
113

Or instead of the ternary operator, you could use Math.min

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate( this string value, int maxLength )
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) { return value; }

        return value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength));
    }
}
  • 10
    Clever! And the following expression is optimized to return a reference to the original string: value.Substring(0, value.Length). – Steve Guidi May 5 '10 at 21:01
  • 4
    Unfortunately it's not optimized for cases where value.Length is less than MaxLength which may be a common case in some data. Also the Length property on string should be capitalized. – jpierson Dec 19 '12 at 20:34
  • 1
    This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. – Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:55
  • 7
    @Bernard, so will a lot of things in the framework...but if I check for it...I either have to default maxLength to 0 or value.Length; or I need to throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeException...which makes more sense in this case, and is already thrown by Substring anyhow. – CaffGeek Jul 3 '15 at 13:54
  • 1
    A bit shorter: return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value : value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength)); – user1127860 Sep 13 '16 at 9:49
37

I figured I would throw in my implementation since I believe it covers all of the cases that have been touched on by the others and does so in a concise way that is still readable.

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
{
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) && value.Length > maxLength)
    {
        return value.Substring(0, maxLength);
    }

    return value;
}

This solution mainly builds upon the Ray's solution and opens up the method for use as an extension method by using the this keyword just as LBushkin does in his solution.

  • This will fail when maxLength is a negative value. – Bernard Jun 27 '13 at 18:54
  • 14
    @Bernard - I would recommend not passing a negative value for the maxLength argument as it is an unexpected value. The Substring method takes the same approach so there is no reason to improve on the exception it throws. – jpierson Jun 28 '13 at 15:32
  • I don't think the IsNullOrEmpty check is necessary? (1) If value is null, there should be no way to call this extension method on it. (2) If value is the empty string, the value.Length > maxLength check will fail. – Jon Schneider Jun 10 '15 at 19:56
  • 6
    @JonSchneider, the IsNullOrEmpty is required because this is an extension method. If you have a variable of type string that has been assigned a null, the compiler does not insert a null check before calling this method. Technically, this is still a static method of the static class. So: stringVar.Truncate(2) Compiles as: StringExt.Truncate(stringVar, 2); – Jeff B Sep 22 '15 at 23:51
31

In .NET 4.0 you can use the Take method:

string.Concat(myString.Take(maxLength));

Not tested for efficiency!

27

You could use LINQ... it eliminates the need to check string length. Admittedly maybe not the most efficient, but it's fun.

string result = string.Join("", value.Take(maxLength)); // .NET 4 Join

or

string result = new string(value.Take(maxLength).ToArray());
  • 2
    why is this not the accepted answer? What's most straight forward, writing your own Extension method that you need to maintain/document, or using something BUILT IN like .Take – Don Cheadle Aug 15 '16 at 14:43
  • 8
    @mmcrae Linq might be more straight forward, but it's also a lot slower. My benchmark says ~400ms for Linq and only ~24ms for Substring for 1 million iterations. – Hein Andre Grønnestad Jan 16 '17 at 12:47
  • 5
    Not to mention the allocations... – ta.speot.is Sep 6 '17 at 6:02
  • This solution shouldn't be ever used. As said in two above comments, there always is memory allocation, even when existing string is not bigger than the max length. Also it's very slow. – Kamarey Feb 27 '18 at 7:05
24

Because performance testing is fun: (using linqpad extension methods)

var val = string.Concat(Enumerable.Range(0, 50).Select(i => i % 10));

foreach(var limit in new[] { 10, 25, 44, 64 })
    new Perf<string> {
        { "newstring" + limit, n => new string(val.Take(limit).ToArray()) },
        { "concat" + limit, n => string.Concat(val.Take(limit)) },
        { "truncate" + limit, n => val.Substring(0, Math.Min(val.Length, limit)) },
        { "smart-trunc" + limit, n => val.Length <= limit ? val : val.Substring(0, limit) },
        { "stringbuilder" + limit, n => new StringBuilder(val, 0, Math.Min(val.Length, limit), limit).ToString() },
    }.Vs();

The truncate method was "significantly" faster. #microoptimization

Early

  • truncate10 5788 ticks elapsed (0.5788 ms) [in 10K reps, 5.788E-05 ms per]
  • smart-trunc10 8206 ticks elapsed (0.8206 ms) [in 10K reps, 8.206E-05 ms per]
  • stringbuilder10 10557 ticks elapsed (1.0557 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00010557 ms per]
  • concat10 45495 ticks elapsed (4.5495 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00045495 ms per]
  • newstring10 72535 ticks elapsed (7.2535 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00072535 ms per]

Late

  • truncate44 8835 ticks elapsed (0.8835 ms) [in 10K reps, 8.835E-05 ms per]
  • stringbuilder44 13106 ticks elapsed (1.3106 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00013106 ms per]
  • smart-trunc44 14821 ticks elapsed (1.4821 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00014821 ms per]
  • newstring44 144324 ticks elapsed (14.4324 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00144324 ms per]
  • concat44 174610 ticks elapsed (17.461 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.0017461 ms per]

Too Long

  • smart-trunc64 6944 ticks elapsed (0.6944 ms) [in 10K reps, 6.944E-05 ms per]
  • truncate64 7686 ticks elapsed (0.7686 ms) [in 10K reps, 7.686E-05 ms per]
  • stringbuilder64 13314 ticks elapsed (1.3314 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00013314 ms per]
  • newstring64 177481 ticks elapsed (17.7481 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00177481 ms per]
  • concat64 241601 ticks elapsed (24.1601 ms) [in 10K reps, 0.00241601 ms per]
  • LinqPad! Love it! I voted you up just for that. – Michael Z. Apr 5 '17 at 23:59
13

I did mine in one line sort of like this

value = value.Length > 1000 ? value.Substring(0, 1000) : value;
  • 1
    -1; this doesn't add anything at all that wasn't already in the accepted answer. – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 22:53
  • 1
    @markamery it's a shorter alternative with less code to write and update when you need to use it. Don't like it? Don't use it – SeanMC Jan 30 '18 at 13:25
  • Quick, simple and fast. This is what I needed. Thanks! – Peter Jul 12 at 13:53
12

Seems no one has posted this yet:

public static class StringExt
{
    public static string Truncate(this string s, int maxLength)
    {
        return s != null && s.Length > maxLength ? s.Substring(0, maxLength) : s;
    }
}

Using the && operator makes it marginally better than the accepted answer.

11

The .NET Framework has an API to truncate a string like this:

Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings.Left(string, int);

But in a C# app you'll probably prefer to roll your own than taking a dependency on Microsoft.VisualBasic.dll, whose main raison d'etre is backwards compatibility.

  • "The .NET Framework has an API" you are contradicting yourself. That's a VB.NET API – Camilo Terevinto Dec 7 '16 at 17:35
  • 8
    @CamiloTerevinto - it's an API that is shipped with the .NET Framework, and can be called from any managed language. – Joe Dec 7 '16 at 18:42
  • The VB DLL has a lot of good stuff in it. Why are so many c# devs against it? – Michael Z. Apr 5 '17 at 23:55
  • No .NET Core support currently, unfortunately. Indeed, the entire Microsoft.VisualBasic.Strings modules in .NET Core is pretty empty. – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 22:06
  • 1
    While I agree with Joe comment, still I don't feel right calling something specific for VB from other languages. If there are so much good stuff in "VB DLL", why not put it in some shared place? Who knows what Microsoft will do with these stuff tomorrow? Stop support or something.. – Kamarey Feb 27 '18 at 7:10
5

I know this is an old question, but here is a nice solution:

public static string Truncate(this string text, int maxLength, string suffix = "...")
{
    string str = text;
    if (maxLength > 0)
    {
        int length = maxLength - suffix.Length;
        if (length <= 0)
        {
            return str;
        }
        if ((text != null) && (text.Length > maxLength))
        {
            return (text.Substring(0, length).TrimEnd(new char[0]) + suffix);
        }
    }
    return str;
}

var myString = "hello world"
var myTruncatedString = myString.Truncate(4);

Returns: hello...

5

A similar variant with C# 6's Null propagation operator

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
{
    return value?.Length <= maxLength ? value : value?.Substring(0, maxLength);
}

Please note, we are essentially checking if value is null twice here.

5

Still no Truncate method in 2016 for C# strings. But - Using C# 6.0 Syntax:

public static class StringExtension
{
  public static string Truncate(this string s, int max) 
  { 
    return s?.Length > max ? s.Substring(0, max) : s ?? throw new ArgumentNullException(s); 
  }
}

It works like a charm:

"Truncate me".Truncate(8);
Result: "Truncate"
5

Another solution:

return input.Substring(0, Math.Min(input.Length, maxLength));
4

Taking @CaffGeek and simplifying it:

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) ? value : value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength));
    }
4

Kndly note that truncating a string not merely means justing cutting a string at a specified length alone but have to take care not to split the word.

eg string : this is a test string.

I want to cut it at 11 . If we use any of the method given above the result will be

this is a te

This is not the thing we want

The method i am using may also not so perfect but it can handle most of the situation

public string CutString(string source, int length)
{
        if (source== null || source.Length < length)
        {
            return source;
        }
        int nextSpace = source.LastIndexOf(" ", length);
        return string.Format("{0}...", input.Substring(0, (nextSpace > 0) ? nextSpace : length).Trim());
} 
3

Just in case there's not enough answers here, here's mine :)

public static string Truncate(this string str, 
                              int totalLength, 
                              string truncationIndicator = "")
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) || str.Length < totalLength) 
        return str;

    return str.Substring(0, totalLength - truncationIndicator.Length) 
           + truncationIndicator;
}

to use:

"I use it like this".Truncate(5,"~")
3

Why not:

string NormalizeLength(string value, int maxLength)
{
    //check String.IsNullOrEmpty(value) and act on it. 
    return value.PadRight(maxLength).Substring(0, maxLength);
}

i.e. in the event value.Length < maxLength pad spaces to the end or truncate the excess.

  • You generate twice as many string objects and it could throw a NullReferenceException from the PadRight call if value is null which is inappropriate, it should be an ArgumentNullException. – Jeremy Apr 14 '16 at 19:59
  • 1
    @Jeremy I don't understand " it could throw a NullReferenceException from the PadRight call if value is null"; have I not mentioned "//check string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) and act on it." – Sri Apr 15 '16 at 20:20
2

For the sake of (over)complexity I'll add my overloaded version which replaces the last 3 characters with an ellipsis in respect with the maxLength parameter.

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength, bool replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis = false)
{
    if (replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis && maxLength <= 3)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("maxLength",
            "maxLength should be greater than three when replacing with an ellipsis.");

    if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(value)) 
        return String.Empty;

    if (replaceTruncatedCharWithEllipsis &&
        value.Length > maxLength)
    {
        return value.Substring(0, maxLength - 3) + "...";
    }

    return value.Substring(0, Math.Min(value.Length, maxLength)); 
}
1

I prefer jpierson's answer, but none of the examples here that I can see are handling an invalid maxLength parameter, such as when maxLength < 0.

Choices would be either handle the error in a try/catch, clamp the maxLength parameter min to 0, or if maxLength is less than 0 return an empty string.

Not optimized code:

public string Truncate(this string value, int maximumLength)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) == true) { return value; }
    if (maximumLen < 0) { return String.Empty; }
    if (value.Length > maximumLength) { return value.Substring(0, maximumLength); }
    return value;
}
  • 3
    Note, that in my implementation I chose not to handle the case where maximumLength is less than 0 because I figured the only thing I would do is throw an ArgumentOutOfRangeExcpetion which essentially what string.Substring() does for me. – jpierson Jun 26 '13 at 3:22
1

Here is a vb.net solution, mark that the if (although ugly) statement improves performance because we do not need the substring statement when string is already smaller than maxlength... By making it an extention to string it is easy to use...

 <System.Runtime.CompilerServices.Extension()> _
    Public Function Truncate(String__1 As String, maxlength As Integer) As String
        If Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(String__1) AndAlso String__1.Length > maxlength Then
            Return String__1.Substring(0, maxlength)
        Else
            Return String__1
        End If
    End Function
  • In VB.net you can replace "Not String.IsNullOrEmpty(String__1)" with "String__1 <> Nothing". It's a little bit shorter. The default value for strings is an empty string. Using "<> Nothing" checks both null and the empty string cases. Test it out with: Truncate("", 50) and Truncate(Nothing, 50) – jrjensen May 15 '16 at 2:52
  • In VB you can do Left(string, maxlength) – Michael Z. Apr 6 '17 at 0:06
1

I know there are a ton of answers already but my need was to keep the beginning and end of the string intact but shorten it to under the max length.

    public static string TruncateMiddle(string source)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(source) || source.Length < 260) 
            return source;

        return string.Format("{0}...{1}", 
            source.Substring(0, 235),
            source.Substring(source.Length - 20));
    }

This is for creating SharePoint URLs that have a max length of 260 characters.

I didn't make length a parameter since it is a constant 260. I also didn't make the first substring length a parameter because I want it to break at a specific point. Finally, the second substring is the length of the source - 20 since I know the folder structure.

This could easily be adapted to your specific needs.

1

I know there are a ton of answers here already, but this is the one I have gone with, which handles both null strings and the situation where the length passed in is negative:

public static string Truncate(this string s, int length)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(s) || s.Length <= length ? s 
        : length <= 0 ? string.Empty 
        : s.Substring(0, length);
}
0

TruncateString

public static string _TruncateString(string input, int charaterlimit)
{
    int characterLimit = charaterlimit;
    string output = input;

    // Check if the string is longer than the allowed amount
    // otherwise do nothing
    if (output.Length > characterLimit && characterLimit > 0)
    {
        // cut the string down to the maximum number of characters
        output = output.Substring(0, characterLimit);
        // Check if the character right after the truncate point was a space
        // if not, we are in the middle of a word and need to remove the rest of it
        if (input.Substring(output.Length, 1) != " ")
        {
            int LastSpace = output.LastIndexOf(" ");

            // if we found a space then, cut back to that space
            if (LastSpace != -1)
            {
                output = output.Substring(0, LastSpace);
            }
        }
        // Finally, add the "..."
        output += "...";
    }
    return output;
}
  • 2
    Why do you precede your public method name with an underscore? – Michael Z. Apr 6 '17 at 0:04
0

As an addition to the possibilities discussed above I'd like to share my solution. It's an extension method that allows null (returns string.Empty) also there is a second .Truncate() for using it with an ellipsis. Beware, it's not performance optimized.

public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength) =>
    (value ?? string.Empty).Substring(0, (value?.Length ?? 0) <= (maxLength < 0 ? 0 : maxLength) ? (value?.Length ?? 0) : (maxLength < 0 ? 0 : maxLength));
public static string Truncate(this string value, int maxLength, string ellipsis) =>
    string.Concat(value.Truncate(maxLength - (((value?.Length ?? 0) > maxLength ? ellipsis : null)?.Length ?? 0)), ((value?.Length ?? 0) > maxLength ? ellipsis : null)).Truncate(maxLength);
0

My two cents with example length of 30 :

  var truncatedInput = string.IsNullOrEmpty(input) ? 
      string.Empty : 
      input.Substring(0, Math.Min(input.Length, 30));
-1

There is nothing in .net for this that I am aware of - here is my version which adds "...":

public static string truncateString(string originalString, int length) {
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(originalString)) {
   return originalString;
  }
  if (originalString.Length > length) {
   return originalString.Substring(0, length) + "...";
  }
  else {
   return originalString;
  }
}
  • 2
    Your version will give strings that are 3 characters longer than the requested length, in case they are truncated. Besides, the triple dots are really just meaningful in representation, I would not store it in a database like that which is the use case that the OP gave. – MarioDS Jun 30 '14 at 14:27
-1
public static string Truncate( this string value, int maxLength )
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value)) { return value; }

        return new string(value.Take(maxLength).ToArray());// use LINQ and be happy
    }
  • The ToArray() call here is just needless overhead; using e.g. String.Concat you can construct a string from an enumerable of characters without having to go via an array. – Mark Amery Jan 13 '18 at 23:09
-1

I'd Recommend using the substring method for the same effective functionality.

    // Gets first n characters.
    string subString = inputString.Substring(0, n);

This has the benefit of letting you splice your string from either side or even somewhere in the middle without writing additional methods. Hope that helps :)

For additional reference: https://www.dotnetperls.com/substring

  • 4
    If your string is smaller than n it will fail. The point of truncate is to prevent that. – JSON Mar 12 '18 at 22:42
-3

Truncate String

public static string TruncateText(string strText, int intLength)
{
    if (!(string.IsNullOrEmpty(strText)))
    {                                
        // split the text.
        var words = strText.Split(' ');

        // calculate the number of words
        // based on the provided characters length 
        // use an average of 7.6 chars per word.
        int wordLength = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Ceiling(intLength / 7.6));

        // if the text is shorter than the length,
        // display the text without changing it.
        if (words.Length <= wordLength)
            return strText.Trim();                

        // put together a shorter text
        // based on the number of words
        return string.Join(" ", words.Take(wordLength)) + " ...".Trim();
    }
        else
        {
            return "";
        }            
    }
  • This does not answer the OP's question. First, it should be a member function (although you have written it as an extension method). Second, the OP does not specify that the text has to be split and words have be truncated to approx. 7.6 chars per word. – Wicher Visser May 27 '16 at 14:06
  • 7.6 is just a number. you can write any other number you wish. This happened to be an average English word length. I found it on google. Using split is just an easy way to break down the words by space. I don't think that you want to display a half word! So unless you loop through to find empty space which will require more code, this is an easy way to truncate a string and display full words. This will ensure you that a string is not longer then the given length and you won't have broken words. – V.T. May 27 '16 at 14:39
-4

This is the code I usually use:

string getSubString(string value, int index, int length)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) || value.Length <= length)
            {
                return value;
            }
            System.Text.StringBuilder sb = new System.Text.StringBuilder();
            for (int i = index; i < length; i++)
            {
                sb.AppendLine(value[i].ToString());
            }
            return sb.ToString();
        }
  • 5
    Please note that concatenating strings with += is an expensive operation, especially when rebuilding character by character. .NET strings are immutable, which means in this case, a new string is created each time in your loop. – Steve Guidi Sep 21 '14 at 16:11
  • @SteveGuidi strings are not immutable, they just masquerade as immutable. I wish strings were true immutable primitives so I could have string and string?, but alas they are not primitives. – Chris Marisic Jan 1 '15 at 0:29
  • You say expensive as if the performance cost is significant, I changed it to use stringBuilder but I find that with += is easier to see what's going on, I just wanted the OP to easily understand the code. – user3390116 Jul 13 '17 at 6:10

protected by Anthony Pegram Feb 16 '18 at 19:22

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