4

What I am trying to achieve is to create convenient syntax for calling a callback on an event only once.

public static class Extensions
{
    public static void Once<T>(this EventHandler<T> @event, EventHandler<T> callback)
    {
        EventHandler<T> cb = null;
        cb = (object that, T info) => {
            if (callback != null) {
                callback(that, info);
            }
            @event -= cb;
        };
        @event += cb;
    }
}

This should allow us to write something like this:

obj.OnSomething.Once((sender, obj) => Console.WriteLine(obj));

Note that OnSomething is an event EventHandler of some type.

The problem is that I get the error message:

Error CS0070: The event SharpTox.Core.Tox.OnFriendMessage' can only appear on the left hand side of += or -= when used outside of the type SharpTox.Core.Tox' (CS0070) (SharpTox.Tests)

Is there no way to achieve this that easily? Do I have to remove event from OnSomething and make it a simple delegate?

3 Answers 3

8

Unfortunately, you can't have a nice syntax here. Like the error message says, all you can do with an event field from outside of its defining class is referencing it at the left of += or -=.

Here's the method that Rx uses to bind an observable to an event:

var observable = Observable.FromEventPattern(
    handler => obj.OnSomething += handler,
    handler => obj.OnSomething -= handler);

Basically, FromEventPattern is a helper that takes two lambdas: one for subscription, and the other for unsubscription. You could use a similar pattern, or just use Rx to achieve the same effect:

Observable.FromEventPattern(h => obj.OnSomething += h, h => obj.OnSomething -= h)
          .Take(1)
          .Subscribe(e => ...);

On a side note, this will keep a reference to obj from the lambda used in Subscribe (there are intermediary glue objects but this is irrelevant). This means that if the event is never called, and if the lambda is long-lived, then obj won't be eligible for GC (a situation called event memory leak). This may or may not be a problem for your case.

1
  • "Unfortunately, you can't have a nice syntax here." This is due to C#'s language specification. Here is the petition to fix that NB. F# Can do this nicely.
    – Aron
    Jan 4, 2015 at 16:22
1

An alternative approach would be to return the callback. In the extension method the callback is deleted/removed. The drawback of this approach is still the fact that the event handler function needs to be defined separately and can not be a lambda.

The extension method:

public static class Extensions
{   
    public static EventHandler<T> Once<T>(this Action<Object, T> callback)
    {
        return (Object s, T e) => 
        {
            if (callback != null) {
                callback(s, e);
                callback = null;
            }
        };
    }
}

A demo class that has different events:

public class Demo
{
    public event EventHandler<String> StringEvent = null;
    public event EventHandler<Int32> IntEvent = null;

    public void NotifyOnWork()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(i);
            if (this.StringEvent != null) { this.StringEvent(this, i.ToString()); }
            if (this.IntEvent != null) { this.IntEvent(this, i); }
        }
    }
}

Usage of the Demo class:

var demo = new Demo();
Action<Object, String> handlerString = (s, e) =>  { Console.WriteLine("echo string {0}", e); };
Action<Object, Int32> handlerInt = (s, e) =>  { Console.WriteLine("echo int {0}", e); };

demo.StringEvent += handlerString.Once();
demo.IntEvent += handlerInt.Once();
demo.StringEvent += (s, e) => Console.WriteLine("i = {0}", e); 
demo.NotifyOnWork();

And the output is:

0
echo string 0
i = 0
echo int 0
1
i = 1
2
i = 2
3
i = 3
4
i = 4
2
  • 1
    The downside is that you never unsubscribe from the events, so the event handlers stay forever and degrade the performance over time. Jan 4, 2015 at 16:23
  • Yes, it degrades performance, but I need this only to write nice looking test cases, so the syntax is clearer and the performance impact is neglectible. Jan 5, 2015 at 12:27
0

You've posted an answer to a similar problem here.

The syntax would look somewhat like this:

obj.Event += (s, e) =>
{
    Detach(s, nameof(obj.Event));
    // ..do stuff..
};

The Detach method would look like this and can be put anywhere you like (most likely a static helper class):

public static void Detach(object obj, string eventName)
{
    var caller = new StackTrace().GetFrame(1).GetMethod();
    var type = obj.GetType();
    foreach (var field in type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic))
    {
        if (typeof(Delegate).IsAssignableFrom(field.FieldType))
        {
            var handler = (field.GetValue(obj) as Delegate)?.GetInvocationList().FirstOrDefault(m => m.Method.Equals(caller));
            if (handler != null)
            {
                type.GetEvent(eventName).RemoveEventHandler(obj, handler);
                return;
            }
        }
    }
}

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