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I'm currently working on a little project over winter break and have run into some issues.

Here is the struct that I'm working with:

struct student{
string last_name;
string first_name;
double exams[NUM_EXAMS];
double average;
char letter_grade;
bool passed;};

I am trying to alphabetize by last name from A to Z. Here is the alphabetize function as well as the swap function it calls:

void alphabetize(student class_list[], int count)
{
    for (int pass = 0; pass < count; pass++)
        for (int x = 0; x < count - pass; x++)
            if (class_list[x].last_name < class_list[x + 1].last_name)
                swap(class_list, x);
}

void swap(student class_list[], int x)
{
    student temp[MAX_STUDENTS];

    temp[x] = class_list[x];
    class_list[x] = class_list[x + 1];
    class_list[x + 1] = temp[x];
}

This runs perfectly fine and alphabetizes the array of structs in reverse order from Z to A.

Here is the original output unsorted:

   Jones        John  87  66  92  88 83.25  B  Pass
   Smith       Peter  55  66  63  58  60.5  D  Pass
   Quest      Nicole  79  89  99  98 91.25  A  Pass
      Wu          Li  98  99 100  91    97  A  Pass
    West     Vincent  80  80  88  89 84.25  B  Pass
McCartin       Susan  80  90 100  85 88.75  B  Pass
Ibrahima     Shuhuru  45  65  54  60    56  F  Fail
   Burns  Antoinette  90  90  90  90    90  A  Pass
      Ng    Lawrence 100 100  90  76  91.5  A  Pass
 Ziggler      Bertha  65  55  58  58    59  F  Fail
 Ionella        Jean 100 100 100 100   100  A  Pass
  Vogler      Samuel  40  50  60  70    55  F  Fail
   Perry         Jim  67  87  76  54    71  C  Pass

and here is the output using

if (class_list[x].last_name < class_list[x + 1].last_name)

in the alphabetize function.

 Ziggler      Bertha  65  55  58  58    59  F  Fail
      Wu          Li  98  99 100  91    97  A  Pass
    West     Vincent  80  80  88  89 84.25  B  Pass
  Vogler      Samuel  40  50  60  70    55  F  Fail
   Smith       Peter  55  66  63  58  60.5  D  Pass
   Quest      Nicole  79  89  99  98 91.25  A  Pass
   Perry         Jim  67  87  76  54    71  C  Pass
      Ng    Lawrence 100 100  90  76  91.5  A  Pass
McCartin       Susan  80  90 100  85 88.75  B  Pass
   Jones        John  87  66  92  88 83.25  B  Pass
 Ionella        Jean 100 100 100 100   100  A  Pass
Ibrahima     Shuhuru  45  65  54  60    56  F  Fail
   Burns  Antoinette  90  90  90  90    90  A  Pass

If I switch

if (class_list[x].last_name < class_list[x + 1].last_name)

in the alphabetize function to

if (class_list[x].last_name > class_list[x + 1].last_name)

I thought it would solve the problem and sort the array from A to Z rather than Z to A. This is what I get as an output:

                    -6.27744e+066-6.27744e+066-6.27744e+066-6.27744e+066-6.2
7744e+066  ═  Pass
   Burns  Antoinette  90  90  90  90    90  A  Pass
Ibrahima     Shuhuru  45  65  54  60    56  F  Fail
 Ionella        Jean 100 100 100 100   100  A  Pass
   Jones        John  87  66  92  88 83.25  B  Pass
McCartin       Susan  80  90 100  85 88.75  B  Pass
      Ng    Lawrence 100 100  90  76  91.5  A  Pass
   Perry         Jim  67  87  76  54    71  C  Pass
   Quest      Nicole  79  89  99  98 91.25  A  Pass
   Smith       Peter  55  66  63  58  60.5  D  Pass
  Vogler      Samuel  40  50  60  70    55  F  Fail
    West     Vincent  80  80  88  89 84.25  B  Pass
      Wu          Li  98  99 100  91    97  A  Pass

As you can see, I'm now missing what would be the last student in this list and instead the output is spitting out these numbers. I don't understand why it is working in reverse and I'm unsure of how to fix this. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

EDIT: Thanks to Jarod42 I worked out a solution to my issue. It was an out of bounds issue with x + 1. Here is the code I used to fix the problem. It works with the input file that I have, but I'm unsure if it would work with a different one. If someone sees a problem with it please let me know.

void alphabetize(student class_list[], int count)
{
    for (int pass = 0; pass < count; pass++)
        for (int x = 0; x < count - pass; x++)
            if (class_list[x].last_name > class_list[x + 1].last_name)
                if (count > x + 1)
                    swap(class_list, x);
}
2
  • Do these explanations in the reference help to explain your understandings of std::string comparison? Jan 4, 2015 at 22:46
  • 2
    You get index out of bounds in that nested for loop. It causes undefined behavior irrespective of how you try to sort the array, so on another try you may get that strange output even when sorting them from Z-A.
    – Călin
    Jan 4, 2015 at 22:49

2 Answers 2

2

With:

for (int x = 0; x < count - pass; x++)
    if (class_list[x].last_name < class_list[x + 1].last_name)

You may have out of bound access with x + 1 when pass == 0.

With STL, you may simply do:

std::sort(std::begin(students), std::end(students),
          [](const student& lhs, const student& rhs) {
              return lhs.last_name < rhs.last_name; // and > for the other order
          });
2
  • 1
    For fun: not even using std::vector :)
    – sehe
    Jan 4, 2015 at 23:03
  • Thanks for your quick answer! I agree that it's most likely an out of bounds issue with 'x + 1'. I'm just starting with C++ and I'm unfamiliar with STL. I would really like to work with this using what my teacher had gone over last semester. Is there some way I can use the swap function and some sort of fail-safe for the out of bounds problem? Jan 4, 2015 at 23:07
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If you really don't want to use C++ style (vectors and stl, e.g. std::sort), try modifying this line:

for (int x = 0; x < count - pass; x++)

into:

for (int x = 0; x < count - pass - 1; x++)

You have to understand invariants. Your sorting algorithm guarantees that at each step pass, you have the last pass positions in your array sorted. That's where -pass comes from. That -1 is due to the fact that at each step within this for loop, you compare the current position with the next one.

However, I strongly recommend you to use std::vector and std::sort, unless you're trying to teach yourself a sorting algorithm.

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  • Thanks for your response. I'm trying to complete this program using what I was taught in the class and not moving ahead too fast. We haven't gone over std::vector or std::sort yet and part of the assignment requires that we write our own alphabetize function. I edited my main post with the solution I came up with at the bottom. I would love to hear your thoughts. EDIT: I tried using the code you suggested with count - pass - 1 and that works as well. Is there any difference in stability between the code I edited into my main post and the code you suggested? Jan 4, 2015 at 23:39
  • In terms of functionality, no, there is not difference. That's because count > x + 1 <=> x < count - 1 which ensures that you will not hit any index out of array bounds. However, the solution I proposed is better firstly because it is less verbose and secondly it is faster since that if statement causes some delay if the number of iterations (i.e. the size of the array) is really large. Also, you do step unnecessary comparisons: you compare pass and pass + 1 positions at each step, even though your algorithm guarantees that your last pass positions are sorted.
    – Călin
    Jan 4, 2015 at 23:48

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