92

How can I format the time elapsed from seconds to hours, mins, seconds?

My code:

start = time.time()
... do something
elapsed = (time.time() - start)

Actual Output:

0.232999801636

Desired/Expected output:

00:00:00.23 
0

6 Answers 6

211

You could exploit timedelta:

>>> from datetime import timedelta
>>> str(timedelta(seconds=elapsed))
'0:00:00.233000'
5
  • 3
    @PadraicCunningham: it works: str(timedelta(seconds=86401)) -> '1 day, 0:00:01'
    – jfs
    Commented Jan 6, 2015 at 11:19
  • 15
    why is this not the right answer? everyone else is describing the impl of timedelta...
    – 43matthew
    Commented Oct 20, 2017 at 2:44
  • 2
    Can you control the format conveniently somehow? E.g. remove millis. Commented Sep 14, 2018 at 14:06
  • note that in Python2.7 this returns natural time, not hours:minutes:seconds. Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 9:51
  • @sunsetjunks the code in the answer produces the same result on both Python 2 and 3.
    – jfs
    Commented Jan 22, 2019 at 10:10
86

If you want to include times like 0.232999801636 as in your input:

import time
start = time.time()
end = time.time()
hours, rem = divmod(end-start, 3600)
minutes, seconds = divmod(rem, 60)
print("{:0>2}:{:0>2}:{:05.2f}".format(int(hours),int(minutes),seconds))

Example:

In [12]: def timer(start,end):
   ....:         hours, rem = divmod(end-start, 3600)
   ....:         minutes, seconds = divmod(rem, 60)
   ....:         print("{:0>2}:{:0>2}:{:05.2f}".format(int(hours),int(minutes),seconds))
   ....:     

In [13]: timer(12345.242,12356.434)
00:00:11.19
In [14]: timer(12300.242,12600.5452)
00:05:00.30
In [19]: timer(0.343,86500.8743)
24:01:40.53
In [16]: timer(0.343,865000.8743)
 240:16:40.53    
In [17]: timer(0,0.232999801636)
00:00:00.23
1
  • 1
    This is a great demonstration of the overall idea, maybe good for a customized formatting, but for simply showing a formatted version of the elapsed time, the solution from jfs is probably more clear with less technical overhead: str(datetime.timedelta(seconds=(stop-start))) stackoverflow.com/a/27793118/3585557 Commented Mar 16, 2021 at 18:08
11

The strftime function of time itself can be (ab)used with limitations (no millisec and <24 hr)

elapsed = 4*3600 + 13*60 + 6                        # 15186 s
time.strftime("%Hh%Mm%Ss", time.gmtime(elapsed))   # '04h13m06s'
3
import time
start = time.time()
#do something
end = time.time()
temp = end-start
print(temp)
hours = temp//3600
temp = temp - 3600*hours
minutes = temp//60
seconds = temp - 60*minutes
print('%d:%d:%d' %(hours,minutes,seconds))
1
  • I tested it by setting temp = 65432 so I couldn't see that the output for something that works just a few seconds will be missing the double zeros. @PadraicCunningham Commented Jan 5, 2015 at 13:35
3

If you want one line of code without import any other library, that worked for me (Python v3.7.11):

print("Elapsed time: " + time.strftime("%H:%M:%S.{}".format(str(elapsed % 1)[2:])[:15], time.gmtime(elapsed)))

Output:

Elapsed time: 00:38:01.357318

You can control the milliseconds to be displayed by modifying "[:15]" to "[:11]", then you will get the desired result:

Elapsed time: 00:45:18.65
0

Perhaps, It would be useful for someone. I have written the function below, which is deriving a string like '2w', '1y' and etc from a number of seconds:

def format_seconds_to_duration(seconds):

df = pd.DataFrame(
    [ 
    { 'Metric': 'y', 'Duration' : seconds / (365*24*60*60)},
    { 'Metric': 'mo', 'Duration' : seconds / (30*24*60*60)},
    { 'Metric': 'w', 'Duration' : seconds / (7*24*60*60)},
    { 'Metric': 'd', 'Duration' : seconds / (24*60*60)},
    { 'Metric': 'h', 'Duration' : seconds / (60*60)},
    { 'Metric': 'm', 'Duration' : seconds / (60)},
    { 'Metric': 's', 'Duration' : seconds}
    ],
    columns=['Metric', 'Duration']
)

res = df[ df['Duration'].round() > 0 ].head(1)

return str(round(res['Duration'].iloc[0])) + res['Metric'].iloc[0]

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